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A Pig Latin Translation Microservice

Project Description

A flask-based microservice to translate english text to pig latin. Wikipedia Link.

Pig Latin is a language game in which words in English are altered. The objective is to conceal the words from others not familiar with the rules.

Pig Latin is simply a form of jargon with rules. The Rules are described later

Demo

You can try your own examples at a web form here.

Example Usage

The fastest way to get started is to request this service from the demo api

Curl

curl --request POST \
  --url https://piglatin.jaichaudhary.com/api/translate \
  --form 'text=How do you say ... in Pig Latin?'

Python

import requests
url = "https://piglatin.jaichaudhary.com/api/translate"
payload = {"text": "How do you say ... in Pig Latin?"}
response = requests.request("POST", url, data=payload)
print response.text

You should see a response like

{
  "text": "Owhay oday ouyay aysay ... inyay Igpay Atinlay?"
}

Installation

If you would like to run the service locally, there are multiple ways

Dockerfile

docker pull ja1chaudhary/pig-latin-translation-service
docker run --name pig-latin-service -p 5000:5000 -d ja1chaudhary/pig-latin-translation-service

Python Package

To install the python package, simply

pip install piglatintranslation
python -m piglatintranslation

Source

git clone https://github.com/Jai-Chaudhary/pig-latin-translation-microservice
cd pig-latin-translation-microservice
python setup.py install
python run.py

Rules

If word begins with consonant sound, all letters before the initial vowel are placed at the end of the word sequence. Then, “ay” is added.

  • pig => igpay
  • banana => ananabay
  • trash => ashtray
  • happy => appyhay
  • duck => uckday
  • glove => oveglay

If word begins with vowel sounds or a silent letter, one just adds “yay” to the end.

  • eat => eatyay
  • omelet => omeletyay
  • are => areyay

Silent Letters

In order to infer silent letters cmu pronunication corpus of 134K words was used(http://www.nltk.org/_modules/nltk/corpus/reader/cmudict.html). The words with silent first letter were filtered into silent_words.json. Among them the most common prefixes were chosen as approximation of silent words. These include ( “pf”, “ph”, “ps”, “pn”, “pt”, “wr”, “ts”, “gn”, “kn”, “jo”, “he”)

Documentation

API documentation is available at http://pig-latin-translation-microservice.readthedocs.io

Testing

To run test cases, simply do

python tests.py
Release History

Release History

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0.2.0

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0.1dev

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File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
PigLatinTranslation-0.2.0.tar.gz (5.8 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Aug 14, 2016

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