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Project Description

Schedaddle is a Python package for getting dates and times on scheduled intervals.

For more information, see http://www.davisd.com/projects/python-schedaddle

Typical Usage is as follows:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import schedaddle

schedaddle.next((2010, 1, 31), 'monthly')

API

The entire Schedaddle api consists of one dictionary, two date functions, and two generator functions.

Dictionary

A dictionary, KNOWN_INTERVALS is exposed by the Schedaddle API. This dictionary consists of string keys representing known interval names with values as tuples in (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond) format.

Date Functions

The Schedaddle API exposes two date functions

next_m

Get the next identifiable date/time tuple resulting from an iterable of schedules.

Keyword arguments:
schedules – an iterable of schedules
a single schedule is a three value tuple consisting of (identifier, start_date, interval)

latest – the most recent date that the schedule ran (optional, if not provided, start_date will be treated as the latest for each schedule)

Returns a two value tuple consisting of the identifier of the matching schedule, and the 7 value date/time tuple. (identifier, (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond))

Example:

>>> import schedaddle
>>> schedaddle.next_m([
... ('first', (2010, 1, 31), 'monthly'),
... ('second', (2010, 1, 31), 'weekly')])
('second', (2010, 2, 7, 0, 0, 0, 0))
>>> import schedaddle
>>> schedaddle.next_m([
... ('first', (2010, 1, 31), (0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)),
... ('second', (2010, 1, 31, 12, 30), 'weekly')],
... latest=(2010, 2, 21))
('first', (2010, 2, 28, 0, 0, 0, 0))

Generators

The Schedaddle API exposes two generator functions

upcoming

Get a generator that produces upcoming date/time tuples on a schedule.

Keyword arguments:

start_date – the date that the schedule begain/begins

interval – can be a string or a tuple.

If a string - valid values are defined in KNOWN_INTERVALS

If a tuple - (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond)

latest – the most recent date that the schedule ran (optional, if not provided, start_date will be treated as the latest)

end_date – the last possible date in the generator (optional)

max_dates – the maximum number of dates the generator should return (optional)

Returns a generator that yields 7 value date/time tuples (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond)

Notes:
If end_date or max_dates is not provided, there will be no end to the amount of dates generated, and so it should then not be used in scenarios requiring a finite number of results, such as list comprehention.

Example:

>>> import schedaddle
>>> g = schedaddle.upcoming((2010, 1, 31, 12, 15), 'weekly', max_dates=3)
>>> l = [s for s in g]
>>> l
[(2010, 2, 7, 12, 15, 0, 0), (2010, 2, 14, 12, 15, 0, 0), (2010, 2, 21, 12, 15, 0, 0)]

upcoming_m

Get a generator that produces upcoming, identifiable date/time tuples resulting from an iterable of schedules.

Generate upcoming dates from an iterable of schedules.

Keyword arguments:
schedules – an iterable of schedules
a single schedule is a tuple consisting of (identifier, start_date, interval)

latest – the most recent date that the schedule ran (optional, if not provided, start_date will be treated as the latest for each schedule)

end_date – the last possible date in the generator (optional)

max_dates – the maximum number of dates the generator should return (optional)

Returns a generator that yields two value date/time tuples consisting of the identifier of the matching schedule and the 7 value date/time tuple. (identifier, (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond))

Notes:
If end_date or max_dates is not provided, there will be no end to the amount of dates generated, and so it should then not be used in scenarios requiring a finite number of results, such as list comprehention.

Example:

>>> import schedaddle
>>> schedule1 = ('first',  (2010, 1, 5),  'weekly')
>>> schedule2 = ('second', (2007, 12, 31), 'monthly')
>>> g = schedaddle.upcoming_m(
... (schedule1, schedule2),
... latest=(2010, 1, 12))
>>> g.next()
('first', (2010, 1, 19, 0, 0, 0, 0))
>>> g.next()
('first', (2010, 1, 26, 0, 0, 0, 0))
>>> g.next()
('second', (2010, 1, 31, 0, 0, 0, 0))

Notes

Arguments

When a date is accepted as an argument in a function, you may use a date or datetime object, or a tuple consisting of one to seven number values (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond). If using tuple and values are not provided for each of the places (eg, no second or microsecond as in (2010, 1, 31, 12, 30)), Schedaddle will fill in the blanks either with zeros or with the maximum value to end the day, whichever makes sense for the argument’s context.

When an interval is accepted as an argument in a function, you may use a string representing a known interval defined in the KNOWN_INTERVALS dictionary, OR you may represent an interval as a seven value tuple (years, months, days, hours, minutes, seconds, microseconds).

Return Values

The functions next and upcoming return and yield a tuple consisting of seven values (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond).

The functions next_m and upcoming_m return and yield a tuple consisting of two values. The first value is the identifier that was passed as part of the schedule which was matched. The second is a tuple consisting of seven values (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, microsecond).

Release History

Release History

0.1.0

This version

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

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Download Files

Download Files

TODO: Brief introduction on what you do with files - including link to relevant help section.

File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
Schedaddle-0.1.0.tar.gz (5.9 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Nov 23, 2011

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