Skip to main content

Implementation of Immutable Sorted Set collection

Project description

SortedSet

Implementation of Immutable Sorted Set collection.

You can get it by downloading it directly or by typing:

$ pip install SortedSet

After it is installed you can import it by typing:

>>> from SortedSet.sorted_set import SortedSet

As for the usage it is as simple as:

>>> SortedSet(['list_of_integer_data'])

For example

>>> SortedSet([1, 2, 5, 3, 3, 1])

Would return the following

SortedSet([1, 2, 3, 5])

SortedSet Operations

Union

You can add two SortedSets together either by using '+' operator, calling .union() method on one of the sets and providing the other, or by using union operator '|'.

Take for example these two SortedSets

>>> a = SortedSet([1, 2, 5, 3])
>>> b = SortedSet([2, 4, 6])

We could add them together by running any of these commands

>>> a + b
>>> a.union(b)
>>> a | b

In all three cases the result would be the SortedSet

SortedSet([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6])

Difference

You can subtract two SortedSets either calling .difference() method on one of the sets and providing the other, or by using difference operator '-'. Be aware that ordering of SortedSets matters.

Take for example the same two SortedSets we already used

>>> a = SortedSet([1, 2, 5, 3])
>>> b = SortedSet([2, 4, 6])

We can subtract them by running one of these two commands

>>> a - b
>>> a.difference(b)

In both cases the result would be the SortedSet

SortedSet([1, 3, 5])

If we were to switch the order of the operands

>>> b - a
>>> b.difference(a)

We would get entirely different result

SortedSet([4, 6])

Symmetric Difference

You can find unique members that are only contained in one of the two SortedSets either by calling .symmetric_difference() method on one of the sets and providing the other, or by using symmetric difference operator '^'.

>>> a = SortedSet([1, 2, 5, 3])
>>> b = SortedSet([2, 4, 6])
>>> a.symmetric_difference(b)
SortedSet([1, 3, 4, 5, 6])
>>> b ^ a
SortedSet([1, 3, 4, 5, 6])

Intersection

You can find unique members that are contained in both of the two SortedSets either by calling .intersection() method on one of the sets and providing the other, or by using intersection operator '&'.

>>> a = SortedSet([1, 2, 5, 3])
>>> b = SortedSet([2, 4, 6])
>>> a.intersection(b)
SortedSet([2])
>>> b & a
SortedSet([2])

Superset, Subset and Disjoint

It is also possible to check if one SortedSet is a superset or subset of another either by using .issuperset() and .issubset() methods or by using operators '>=' and '<='.

>>> a = SortedSet([1, 2])
>>> b = SortedSet([1, 2, 3])
>>> a.issuperset(b)
False
>>> a >= b
False
>>> a.issubset(b)
True
>>> a <= b
True

You can find out are two SortedSets disjoint, meaning that they have no common members by running .isdisjoint() method on one of the SortedSets.

>>> a = SortedSet([1, 3])
>>> b = SortedSet([6, 4, 8])
>>> a.isdisjoint(b)
True
>>> a = SortedSet([4, 3])
>>> b = SortedSet([6, 4, 8])
>>> b.isdisjoint(a)
False

Other operations

Other supported operations are:

len() contains() comparison of two SortedSets for equality or inequality access to SortedSet members by their index

>>> a = SortedSet([1, 3, 7, 5])
>>> len(a)
4
/>>> a.contains(1)
True
>>> a.contains(31)
False
>>> b = SortedSet([2, 3])
>>> a == b
False
>>> c = SortedSet([3, 1, 5, 7])
>>> a == c
True
>>> a != b
True
>>> a[0]
1
>>> b[1]
3

Project details


Download files

Download the file for your platform. If you're not sure which to choose, learn more about installing packages.

Source Distribution

SortedSet-1.0.tar.gz (3.3 kB view hashes)

Uploaded source

Supported by

AWS AWS Cloud computing Datadog Datadog Monitoring Facebook / Instagram Facebook / Instagram PSF Sponsor Fastly Fastly CDN Google Google Object Storage and Download Analytics Huawei Huawei PSF Sponsor Microsoft Microsoft PSF Sponsor NVIDIA NVIDIA PSF Sponsor Pingdom Pingdom Monitoring Salesforce Salesforce PSF Sponsor Sentry Sentry Error logging StatusPage StatusPage Status page