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A small library to work with numbers of any base

Project description

basemath

A small python library to work with numbers of any base

Install it using pip:

pip install basemath

If you need to work with hex, bin, oct, any-base numbers, you can use this simple python library. Any-base number - is the number with the base you need to use it. Using this library (version 1.0) you can carry out basic operations like:

  • plus
  • minus
  • mul

Also you can convert a-base number to any other b-base. You can find decimal number from any-base number anytime.

For example you need to find check sum for IP packet:

# this is ip packet:
packet = '''45000034d5274000380600005fa77a0aac106429'''.upper()
# convert it into bnum type
packet = bNUM(packet, 16)
# get 10 bnums with length 4 and same base 16
parts  = packet.get_k_bnums(10, 4)
# get sum of this 10 bnums
result = bnum_sum(parts)
# cut the head of result and sum it with the rest
# to make result with length 4
result = result.cutdown(4)
# find check sum as FFFF - result
result = bNUM('FFFF', 16, 4) - result

The result will be check sum:

'(F8F0).16'

Consistance:

bNUM

bNUM(value, base, length=None, cut=None)

Use this class to carry out operations with any-base number. You can create bnum (any-base number using bNUM class) using:

  1. Decimal number (integers only):
    number = 10 # or any integer you want
    base   = 2  # or any base you want starting from 2
    bnum   = bNUM(number, base)
    print(bnum)
    #
    >> '(1010).2'
  1. String representation of your any-base number:
    str_basenum = '1010'
    base        = 2
    bnum        = bNUM(str_basenum, base)
    print(bnum)

    >> '(1010).2'
  1. List representation of your any-base number:
    list_basenum = ['1', '0', '1', '0']
    base         = 2
    bnum         = bNUM(list_basenum, base)
    print(bnum)

    >> '(1010).2'

You can also pass list of bnums as a value:

    bnums = [bNUM('10', 2), bNUM('10', 2)]
    base  = 2
    bnum  = bNUM(bnums, base)
    print(bnum)

    >> '(1010).2'

As you can mention, the string output of bNUM object useing format (number).base: (10).10, (1010).2, (A).16 and etc bNUM uses local list ORDER to represent and operate with any element of any base. ORDER list consists of strings that are representations of any-base digits: ORDER = ['0', '1', '2', '3', '4', ..., 'A', 'B', 'C', ..., 'a', 'b', 'c', ..., !1A, !1B, !1C, ..........] THE ELEMENTS ARE CASE-SENSETIVE! SO YOU SHOULD PASS STINGS AND LISTS INTO bNUM KNOWING THAT, E.G. 'A' IS DIFFERENT THAN 'a': 'A' = 10, 'B' = 11, ..., 'Z' = 35, 'a' = 36, 'b' = 37, ..., 'z' = 61, '!1A' = 62, '!1B' = 63, ...*

As you can see, starting after 'z' it goes '!1A' - is the syntax to use next other any-base digits.It goes as ![period of repeating number]letter There are '!' signs to indicate the start of the new any-base digit that is out of standard range from 0 to 9, from A to Z and from a to z: | String representations | Decimals | | --- | --- | | 0 - 9 | 0 - 9 | | A - Z | 10 - 35 | | a - z | 36 - 61 | | !1A - !1Z | 62 - 87 | | !1a - !1z | 88 - 113 | | !2A - !2Z | 114 - 139 | | !2a - !2z | 140 - 165 | | ... | ... | | !1000A - !1000Z | 52010 - 52035 | | !1000a - !1000z | 52036 - 52061 |

So you can use up to 52061 base numbers.

The attributes of bNUM object:

  • string - string representation of number: bNUM(10, 2).string -> '1010'
  • array - array representation of number: bNUM(10, 2).array -> ['1', '0', '1', '0']
  • base - base of number: bNUM(10, 2).base -> 2
  • decimal - decimal number representation: bNUM(10, 2).decimal -> 10

length parameter

length=None (int)

Use length parameter to keep this length of bnum. For example, if you pass number with zeros at the highest rank (e.g. '0001010') without length parameter, then this zeros is erased:

  string = '0001010'
  base   = 2
  bnum   = bNUM(string, base)  print(bnum)

  >> '(1010).2'

Than, use length parameter to keep this length:

  bnum = bNUM(string, base, length=7)
  print(bnum)

  >> '(0001010).2'

Use length parameter to expand the length of your bnum, filling it with zeros:

  bnum = bNUM('1010', 2, length=10)
  print(bnum, len(bnum))

  >> '(0000001010).2', 10

If you pass length less than your any-base number, then nothing happens. Length parameter is only working to keep or expand by zeros original length of any-base number:

  bnum = bNUM('01010', 2, length=4)
  print(bnum)

  >> '(01010).2'

To remove zeros from bnum use cutzeros method.

to_len

to_len(length) -> bNUM

Use this method with your bnum to return new bnum with new or the same length. Again, the length can only be the same or expanded by filling with zeros:

  bnum1 = bNUM('1010', 2)
  bnum2 = bnum1.to_len(10)
  print(bnum2)

  >> '(0000001010).2'

cutdown

cutdown(length) -> bNUM

The operation of cutdown can be defined by this algorithm:

  1. Take number A as input with length equals input_len, and reqired length equals output_len
  2. Save elements with the index greater than output_len
  3. Make new number B from this elements by adding zeros to the highest rank of the resulting number
  4. Make new number C from elements that left in A (index less than output_length)
  5. Find sum: B + C
  6. If sum length = output_len, then end of algorithm. If not, then cutdown sum

For example: We have number 1010 of base 2. The cutdown to length = 3: A = 1010 B = 001 (the first 1 from A expanded to length = 3) C = 010 (the rest of A) result := 001 + 010 = 011

The cutdown to length = 2: A = 1010 B = 10 (the first to numbers from A) C = 10 (the rest elements from A) sum := 10 + 10 = 100 Continuing... A = 100 B = 01 C = 00 result := 01 + 00 = 01

  bnum1 = bNUM('420', 10)
  bnum2 = bnum1.cutdown(2) # 04 + 20 = 24
  bnum3 = bnum1.cutdown(1) # 42 + 0 = 42; 4 + 2 = 6
  bnum4 = bnum1.cutdown(3) # the same as bnum1
  print(bnum2, bnum3, bnum4)

  >> '(24).10', '(6).10', '(420).10'

You can pass int cut parameter creating new bNUM to use cutdown operation on created bnum.

math operations

You can find sum, multiplication, substraction of two bnums using standard python syntax:

 bnum1 = bNUM('1010', 2) # 10
 bnum2 = bNUM('10', 2)   # 2
 print(bnum1 + bnum2)    # output = (1100).2  = 12
 print(bnum1 * bnum2)    # output = (10100).2 = 20
 print(bnum1 - bnum2)    # output = (1000).2  = 8

Pay attention, if the minued is less then subtrahend (negative result of substraction), than the return will be decimal number of type int (not a bNUM):

 print(bnum2 - bnum1) # output = -8

You can carry out some bitwise operations like XOR, bitwise OR and bitwise AND (or just bitwise multiplication):

 bnum1 = bNUM('1010', 2) # 10
 bnum2 = bNUM('10', 2)   # 2
 print(bnum1 ^ bnum2)    # 1010 XOR 10 = 1000 = 8
 print(bnum1 | bnum2)    # 1010 OR  10 = 1010 = 10
 print(bnum1 & bnum2)    # 1010 AND 10 = 1000 = 2

other methods

Use to_base(base) to get new bNUM object with new base:

 bnum2  = bNUM('1010', 2)
 bnum16 = bnum2.to_base(16)
 bnum10 = bnum16.to_base(10)
 print(bnum2, bnum16, bnum10)

 >> (1010).2, (A).16, (10).10

Use your bnums as standard python lists. Use index syntax to get bnum elements of type bNUM. But, pay attention! The indices here are not simple: the rank in bnums is left oriented, so are indices. Using indices you passes the power of digit position: 1 0 1 0 - binary number 3 2 1 0 - indices/powers of base

A F F 3 C 1 - hex number 5 4 3 2 1 0 - indices/powers of base

 bnum = bNUM('123456789', 10)
 print(bnum.array, bnum.string)

 >> ['1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9'], '123456789'

 print(bnum[0], type(bnum[0]))

 >> (9).10, <class 'bNUM'>

 print(bnum[-1])

 >> (1).10

 for b in bnum:
  print(b, end=' ')

 >> (9).10, (8).10, (7).10, (6).10, (5).10, (4).10, (3).10, (2).10, (1).10

Just think of it like you get item by index using reverted bnum.array. Or you can use method from_end passing index as in standard array. Don't forget that you can change single element of your bnum using index syntax.

 bnum1 = bNUM('1010', 2)
 print(bnum1, bnum1.decimal)

 >> (1010).2, 10

 bnum1[0] = 1
 print(bnum1, bnum1.decimal)

 >> (1011).2, 11

Use method insert and append like you use it with python lists.

You can get copy of bNUM object using method copy:

 bnum1 = bNUM('1010', 2)
 bnum2 = bnum1.copy()
 print(bnum2) 
 >> (1010).2

 bnum1[0] = 1
 print(bnum1, bnum2)

 >> (1011).2, (1010).2

Or just copy parameters of another bnum to yours using method copy_here(bnum):

 bnum1 = bNUM('1010', 2)
 bnum2 = bNUM('FFFF', 16)
 bnum1.copy_here(bnum2)
 print(bnum1)

 >> (FFFF).16

Fill bnum with any value useing fill(value) method (you can pass str or int < 10):

 bnum = bNUM('AAA', 16)
 bnum.fill('F')
 print(bnum)

 >> (FFF).16

Add amount of zeros you want to the lowest ranks using method shift:

 bnum1 = bNUM('111', 2)
 bnum2 = bnum1.shift(3)
 print(bnum1, bnum2)

 >> (111).2, (111000).2

Use split(k, length) method to split bnum by k new bnums with the same length:

 bnum = bNUM('ABCDEF', 16)
 print(bnum.split(3, 2))

 >> [ (AB).16, (CD).16, (EF).16 ]

init functions

There are functions to create bnum objects: zeros(length, base) and ones(length, base). zeros creates bNUM object filled with zeros. ones creates bNUM object filled with ones:

 bnum0 = zeros(4, 135)
 print(bnum0)

 >> (0000).135

 bnum1 = ones(4, 666)
 print(bnum1)

 >> (1111).666

additional functions

There functions like de2array, de2str, bnum_sum:

  • de2array(decimal, base) - creates array of string representations of number of passed base
  • de2str(decimal, base) - the same as the de2array, but returns string
  • bnum_sum(bnums) - returns sum of bnums in passed list

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