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Chipy is a single-file python module for generating digital hardware.

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Chipy – Constructing Hardware In PYthon

Chipy is a single-file python module for generating digital hardware. Chipy provides a simple and clean API for writing Verilog code generators. Structural and behavioral circuit modelling is supported.

A Simple Example

The following is a simple Chipy example design:

from Chipy import *

with AddModule(“ADD_OR_SUB_DEMO”):

clk = AddInput(“CLK”) sub = AddInput(“SUB”) a, b = AddInput(“A B”, 32) out = AddOutput(“OUT”, 32, posedge=clk)

with If(sub):
out.next = a - b
with Else:
out.next = a + b
with open(“demo.v”, “w”) as f:
WriteVerilog(f)

The AddModule function adds a new module to the design and return it. To add elements to a module, create a with <module>: … block and call the corresponding Add… functions from within that block.

Many functions and expressions in Chipy code return a signal. E.g. AddInput(..), AddOutput(..), or a + b in the above code. Some signals are registers, which just means that they can be assigned to, either by calling Assign(<assignee>, <value>) or by assigning to the .next attribute, as demonstrated in the code above.

Registers also need a synchronisation element, such as a FF, assigned to them. This can either be done by calling functions such as AddFF(..), or in simple cases using keyword arguments such as posedge=<clk_signal> when creating the register itself.

Registers that are not assigned a value and/or do not have a synchronization element will cause a runtime error in WriteVerilog.

Finally assignments can be conditional, enabling behavioral modelling. This is done by putting the assignments in blocks such as with If(..): … or with Else:.

Here is a different version of the design, demonstrating some of the variations mentioned so far:

from Chipy import *

with AddModule(“ADD_OR_SUB_DEMO”):

clk = AddInput(“CLK”) sub = AddInput(“SUB”) a, b = AddInput(“A B”, 32) out = AddOutput(“OUT”, 32)

with If(sub):
Assign(out, a - b)
with Else:
Assign(out, a + b)

AddFF(out, posedge=clk)

with open(“demo.v”, “w”) as f:
WriteVerilog(f)

Chipy Reference Manual

Chipy maintains a global design state that contains a set of (Verilog/RTL) modules and a stack of design contexts. The Chipy Add* functions are used to add elements to the design in memory. Chipy APIs that are used with the Python with statement are used to maintain the stack of design contexts. The current context determines for example to which module a new instance or wire should be added. So for example, the AddInput function does not have a parameter that tells it to which module to add a new input port. Instead the input port is added to the module referenced to by the current context.

Creating modules and generating Verilog

### AddModule(name)

This function adds a new module to the design. The module created by this function is returned. A Python with block using a Chipy module as argument is used to create a new Chipy context that can be used to add elements to the module. For example, the following will create a new module demo with an input port clk:

demo_mod = AddModule(“demo”)

with demo_mod:
AddInput(“clk”)

### Module(name=None)

This functions looks up the module with the specified name. If no such module is found, None is returned. If the name parameter is omitted then the module referenced by the current context is returned.

### WriteVerilog(f)

This function write the current design to the specified file handle. The file has to be opened first using for example the Python open function:

with open(“demo.v”, “w”) as f:
WriteVerilog(f)

### ResetDesign()

This function resets the global Chipy state, e.g. for when multiple designs are created from one Python script.

Adding inputs and outputs

### AddInput(name, type=1)

This function adds a new input port to the current module. The new signal is returned. If name contains more than one white-space separated token, then multiple ports are created at once and a list is returned. For example:

with AddModule(“demo”):
clk, a, b = AddInput(“clk a b”)

The type argument specifies the width of the new signal. A negative number denotes a signed signal, i.e. the value 5 would be used to create an unsigned 5 bit wide signal, and the value -5 would be used to create a signed 5 bit wide signal.

Instead of an integer, an interface (see below) can be passed as type for the new signal. In that case multiple input ports are generated, as specified by the interface, and a bundle (see blow) of those signals is returned.

### AddOutput(name, type=1, posedge=None, negedge=None, nodefault=False, async=False)

Like AddInput, but adds and output port. The signals returned by this functions are registers, i.e. they have a .next member that can be assigned to.

The keyword arguments posedge, negedge, and nodefault cause AddOuput to automatically call AddFF (see below) on the generated registers. Similarly, async=True causes AddOuput to call AddAsync (see below) on the generated registers.

Registers and synchronization elements

### AddReg(name, type=1, posedge=None, negedge=None, nodefault=False, async=None) ### AddFF(signal, posedge=None, negedge=None, nodefault=False) ### AddAsync(signal) ### Assign(lhs, rhs)

Signals and expessions

### Sig(arg, width=None) ### Sig Operators ### Cond(cond, if_val, else_val) ### Concat(args) ### Repeat(num, sig)

Bundles

### Bundle(arg=None, **kwargs) ### Bundle.add(self, name, member) ### Bundle.get(name) ### Bundle.regs() and Bundle.regs() ### Bundle.keys(), Bundle.values(), Bundle.items() ### Zip(bundles, recursive=False) ### Module.bundle(self, prefix=””)

Interfaces

### AddPort(name, type, role, posedge=None, negedge=None, nodefault=False, async=None) ### Module.intf(self, prefix=””) ### Stream(data_type, last=False, destbits=0)

Memories

### AddMemory(name, type, depth, posedge=None, negedge=None) ### Memory read and write ### Memory bundles

Hierarchical Designs

### AddInst(name, type) ### Connect(sigs)

Behavioral Modelling

### If, ElseIf, Else ### Switch, Case, Default

Todos

  • Complete documentation
  • More testcases / examples
  • Improved error reporting
  • Bundles: flat, unflat, Map, concat
  • Verilog Primitive Inst
  • Backbox modules
  • Label(name, sig)

License

Chipy – Constructing Hardware In PYthon

Copyright (C) 2016 Clifford Wolf <clifford@clifford.at>

Permission to use, copy, modify, and/or distribute this software for any purpose with or without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice and this permission notice appear in all copies.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS” AND THE AUTHOR DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, DIRECT, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.

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