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Project Description

Config file parsing and option management.

Defining Configuration Options

# Example conf.py

from confpy.api import Configuration
from confpy.api import Namespace
from confpy.api import StringOption

cfg = Configuration(
    http_options=Namespace(
        description="Options related to HTTP functions.",
        endpoint=StringOption(
            description="The HTTP endpoint to fetch.",
            default="https://some-api.com",
            required=True,
        ),
    ),
)

The above models a configuration file with one section named “http_options” which contains on option named “endpoint”. Any number of options can be added to a namespace and any number of namespaces can be added to a configuration

All options have the same core keyword arguments. You may set a default value for the option using the ‘default’ keyword and mark the option as required with the ‘required’ keyword. Marking an option as required which already has a default value is redundant and will have no effect.

The description keyword arguments may be given as shown above. These do not directly impact the functionality of the object. Instead, descriptions are used when generating sample config files to help document what different options represent.

Configuration definitions like the one above can be defined anywhere within your code. However, it is strongly recommended that you have one module, or very few modules, in your project which contain only these definitions. They should be separate from all other code and logic in your project. This is suggested because these definitions must be loaded into a Python process before they are used by other code. Techniques for doing this are below in the ‘Loading Configuration Options’ section.

Using Options In Your Code

Any module which imports your configuration definition can access the options you have defined. Continuing the example from above:

# some other python file in your project
from myproject.conf import cfg

def get_api_data(endpoint=None):
    endpoint = endpoint or cfg.http_options.endpoint
    return requests.get(endpoint)

All confpy options are automatically converted to the appropriate Python type based on the option used. Accessing the option through its namespace will retrieve the currently set configuration value.

Loading Configuration Options

Once the options are defined and used in the code they must be set before they are useful. Setting values can be done with one, or more, configuration files, environment variables, and command line arguments. Here are all of the ways to define the “endpoint” option from our example:

Example INI:

[http_options]
endpoint = "https://some-other-api.com"

Example JSON:

{
    "http_options": {
        "endpoint": "https://some-other-api.com"
    }
}

Example Python:

from myproject.conf import cfg
cfg.http_options.endpoint = "https://some-other-api.com"

Example Env Var:

# Note: The CONFPY prefix is configurable.
export CONFPY_HTTP_OPTIONS_ENDPOINT="https://some-other-api.com"

Example CLI Flag:

some_executable --http_options_endpoint="https://some-other-api.com"

All of the above examples set the same option to the same value. Any combination of these may be used to set or overwrite options. The option parser will follow a simple pattern for setting and overwrite option values. Configuration files are parsed first with later files overwriting values from earlier files. Environment variables are parsed next and can overwrite any values set by configuration files. CLI flags are parsed last and can overwrite any value set.

In order to bring these values into your Python process you need to add a line in your “main” (or equivalent) method which imports your configuration definition and another line which parses and loads the option values. As stated above, the importing of configuration definitions must happen before all other code logic. After the definitions are loaded, but before any other project code, the option values must also be parsed and loaded. For example:

def main():

    from myproject.conf import cfg
    # import other configuration definitions if needed.

    from confpy.api import parse_options
    # Files are loaded in order. Later values can overwrite earlier values.
    # Pass an 'env_prefix' keyword argument to change the prefix used
    # in environment variables.
    parse_options(files=('example.ini', 'example.json', 'example.py'))

    # start your service or WSGI app or CLI call.
    from myproject.wsgi import app
    print(cfg.my_options.http_endpoint)
    app.run(8888)

Option Types

Values from configuration files are automatically converted to the appropriate Python type based on the option object used in the configuration definition. The currently available types are:

  • BoolOption(description=None, required=False, default=None)

    An option which represents a True or False value. The text values of ‘yes’, ‘true’, and ‘1’ are converted to True. The text values of ‘no’, ‘false’, and ‘0’ are converted to False. All values are case-insensitive.

  • ListOption(description=None, option=None, required=False, default=None)

    An option which represents a list of values. The ‘option’ parameter must be an option object which will be used to load/validate each item in the list.

  • IntegerOption(description=None, required=False, default=None)

    An option which represents an integer value.

  • FloatOption(description=None, required=False, default=None)

    An option which represents a floating point value.

  • StringOption(description=None, required=False, default=None)

    An option which represents any string value.

  • PatternOption(description=None, pattern=None, required=False, default=None)

    An option which represents a string constrained by a regex pattern. The ‘pattern’ attribute must be a string which represent the regexp to use.

Generating Sample Configuration Files

There is a programmatic API for generating sample configurations in the ‘confpy.example’ module. However, the easiest way to generate samples is by using the ‘confpy-generate’ script that is installed with this package.

$ confpy-generate --help
usage: confpy-generate [-h] [--module MODULE] [--file FILE]
                       [--format {JSON,INI}]

Confpy example generator.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help           show this help message and exit
  --module MODULE      A python module which should be imported.
  --file FILE          A python file which should be evaled.
  --format {JSON,INI}  The output format of the configuration file.

Multiple ‘–module’ and ‘–file’ flags may be added to load additional configuration definitions before generating the sample. Module should be importable on the Python path while files must be paths for which the current user has read permissions. By default the generator will create a JSON file. Use the ‘–format’ flag to override this behaviour. Our running example would generate the following:

confpy-generate --module="myproject.conf"
{
    "http_options": {
        "endpoint": "https://some-api.com"
    }
}

confpy-generate --module="myproject.conf" --format="INI"
# Options related to HTTP functions.
[http_options]
endpoint = "https://some-api.com" # The HTTP endpoint to fetch.

While developing, it may be easier to use the file path rather than the module path if your file is not installed on the Python path.

confpy-generate --file ./my_project/conf.py

Testing

All tests are organized in the ‘tests’ subdirectory. The layout of the test modules is paired one-to-one with the modules they test. For example, the tests for confpy.core.config are found in tests/core/test_config.py. Attempt to maintain this organization when adding new tests.

This repository comes with a tox.ini file which is configured to run a fairly exhaustive set of tests. All the current unit tests run, and pass, under Python 2.6, 2.7, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4 interpreters. Running the default tox command will attempt to run the tests in all these environments. In addition, tox is also configured to run PEP8, PyFlakes, and PyLint checks. The PyLint checks will make use of the .pylintrc file also included in this repository.

License

(MIT License)

Copyright (C) 2015 Kevin Conway

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to
deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the
rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or
sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING
FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS
IN THE SOFTWARE.

Contributing

All contributions to this project are protected under the agreement found in the CONTRIBUTING file. All contributors should read the agreement but, as a summary:

You give us the rights to maintain and distribute your code and we promise
to maintain an open source distribution of anything you contribute.
Release History

Release History

0.10.0

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