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Project Description

REST service framework for discoverable services.

Writing RESTful services can be repetitive. Every new resource in an API requires that you pick a URL route, write code to validation data, write a request handler endpoint, convert your data to something which can be JSON encoded, JSON encode your data view, add pagination, set all the right headers, and return the proper response codes. Then you have write a new HTTP client, create object representation of your REST resources, and handle all your chosen HTTP response codes. Finally, you get a change to integrate your new service into the code where you actually wanted it by using your Python client or hacking it up on the CLI.

This project takes all of that boilerplate work and automates it. You focus on the important parts of managing your resource data and integrating the service into your other code. We handle the REST.

Quick Example

from discoverpy.application import Application
from discoverpy.service import Service
from discoverpy.resources.readonly import ReadOnlyResource

class HelloWorldResource(ReadOnlyResource):

    hellos = [{"name": "world"}, {"name": "hello"}]

    identifier = "name"

    def get(self, query, identifier):
        return {
            "name": identifier,
        }

    def load(self, query):
        return self.hellos

service = Service(
    name="greeting",
    description="A service for greeting people and machines.",
    version="1",
)
service.add(
    HelloWorldResource(
        name="hello",
        description="Greet a person or machine with hello.",

    )
)

app = Application(services=[service])

Now run the service under any WSGI server and request away.

# Get a paginated list of resources.
curl "localhost:8888/greeting/v1/hello"
# Get an instance of a resource.
curl "localhost:8888/greeting/v1/hello/you"

# See your new service in the API discovery service.
curl "localhost:8888/discover/v1/service?name=greeting"
curl "localhost:8888/discover/v1/resource?service=greeting&version=1"

The example is degenerate, but the principle should visible: You don’t have to deal with boilerplate. Implementing a resource class which can manage your data is sufficient and the framework will handle the HTTP bits.

Service Discovery API

The namesake of the project is rooted in the automatic service discovery API which is generated with each WSGI application. It uses the metadata given when you create Service or Resource objects to construct an API which allows consumers to see what services your endpoint provides, what resources are exposed by those services, and the JSON schema used to validate input.

The service discovery API works as follows:

  • GET /discover/v1/service

    Get a paginated list of all services registered with the WSGI application.

  • GET /discover/v1/service/{service name}?version={service version}

    Get an instance of a service.

  • GET /discover/v1/resource?service={service name}&version={service version}

    Get a paginated list of resources registered with the service.

  • GET /discover/v1/resource/{resource name}?service={service name}&version={service version}

    Get an instance of a resource.

This API is used to power the automatic client.

Automatic Client

The project ships with a Python client which leverages the service discovery API to automatically provide an interface to new services and resources.

from discoverpy.client.api import Client

client = Client(endpoint='http://localhost:8888')

# Iterate over all services and resources.
for service in client.services:

    print('name: {0}, version: {1}, description: {2}'.format(
        service.name,
        service.version,
        service.description,
    ))

    for resource in service.resources:

        print('name: {0}, description: {1}'.format(
            resource.name,
            resource.description,
        ))

# Get a specific resource and iterate over its paginated output.
resource = client.service('greeting', version='1').resource('hello')
for hello in resource.load():

    print('name: {0}'.format(hello.name))

Resource Classes

There is a base Resource class which can be extended, but resources can be any Python object which expose the following signatures:

  • identifier

    The field name of the resource identifier in a payload.

  • name

    The name of the resource.

  • description

    The description of the resource.

  • validator

    The JSON schema validator to use with the resource.

  • load(query)

    Return a two-tuple where the first element is the paginated content and the second is the total number of items which match the query.

  • get(query, identifier)

    Return a single resource matching the query.

  • create(query, data)

    Create a new resource and return it.

  • update(query, identifier, data)

    Update an instance and return the new data.

  • delete(query, identifier)

    Delete the given resource

The get, load, create, update, and delete methods should return Python dictionaries which can be JSON encoded. In each method the query parameter will be a special Query object which wraps a URL query string for easier management, the identifier will the the last portion of a URL, and data will be a Python dictionary which was decoded from JSON input.

Any complete implementation of the Resource interface may be passed to the Service object. There are built in versions of Resource which provide some handy features.

The resources.readonly.ReadOnlyResource allows subclasses to only implement get and load. It will handle the other methods appropriately. The resources.sqlalchemy.SqlalchemyResource allows you to pass in a SQLAlchemy ORM model and generate an API around it. Look at the SqlalchemyResource as an example for how complex resources may be implemented.

License

(MIT License)

Copyright (C) 2015 Kevin Conway

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to
deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the
rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or
sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING
FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS
IN THE SOFTWARE.

Contributing

All contributions to this project are protected under the agreement found in the CONTRIBUTING file. All contributors should read the agreement but, as a summary:

You give us the rights to maintain and distribute your code and we promise
to maintain an open source distribution of anything you contribute.
Release History

Release History

0.3.1

This version

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0.3.0

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Download Files

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File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
discoverpy-0.3.1.tar.gz (22.0 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Feb 18, 2015

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