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Project Description
# elasticsearch-eslib

2015.11.14 -- Hans Terje Bakke

Python library for document processing for Elasticsearch.

While Elasticsearch is what we originally created it for, it is fully usable for anything else as well.
The only limitation is that a lot of the processing stages are using an Elasticsearch-like document format.
But this can easily be converted to something else. For example, a SolrWriter could take an "esdoc" as input
and write it to Solr. The "esdoc" in this case is simply a JSON compatible Python dict type with the following
meta fields, that may even be omitted in many cases, and that you can make whatever you want of:

```json
{
"_index" : "(some kind of document cluster, like DB table, search index, etc.)",
"_type" : "(document type in some data store)",
"_id" : "(document id)",
"_source" : {
(document fields and data go here...)
}
}
```

## Introduction

A 'processor' processes incoming data and generates output.

It can also generate its own data or fetch from external data sources and services.
Instead, or in addition to, writing output to its own 'sockets', it can also write data
to external data sources and services. In these cases it is commonly referred to as a 'generator',
and has its own execution thread.

A processor has one or more input 'connectors' that can connect to one more output 'sockets'.
Connectors and sockets (commonly called 'terminals') are registered with an optional 'protocol' tag.
If it exists, an attempted connection will check if the data protocol is the same in both connector
and socket.

A processor B is said to 'subscribe' to output from processor A if it has a connector connected a
socket on A. In this case, A has the role of 'producer' (to B) and B has the role of 'subscriber' (to A).

## Installation

### Prerequisites

This library requires python 2.7.

BeautifulSoup, used in some of the document processing stages, requires libxml2 and libxslt.
On Fedora (Amazon Linux), this can be installed using:

```
yum install libxml2-devel libxslt-devel
```

### Install eslib with pip
```
pip install eslib
```

## Usage

From a Python script, we can create a processing graph as in this example:

```python
a = ElasticsearchReader()
b = ElasticsearchWriter()
a.config.index = "employees"
b.config.index = "employees_copy"
b.subscribe(a)
```

and execute it with

```python
a.start()
```

In this simple example, the first processor is a generator, and the entire pipeline will finish when 'a'
completes. The simple "b.subscribe(a)" is possible because there is only one connector in 'b' and only
one socket in 'a'. Otherwise, we would have to specify the connector and socket names.

By default, a processor that is stopped either explicitly from outside, or completes generating data (as
in this example), will send a stop signal to its subscribers. This is not always a desirable behaviour.
Say we had 20 readers sending data to 1 writer. We would not like the writer to stop when the first reader
completes. To avoid this, we can use

```python
...
b.keepalive = True
a.start()
time.sleep(10) # The reader is still working in its own thread
b.put(mydoc) # Writes to the only connector ("input", of protocol "esdoc")
a.wait() # Wait for a to complete/stop
b.stop() # ... then explicitly stop b
```

One processor/connector can subscribe to data from many processors/sockets. One processor can have many
different named connectors, expecting data in various formats (hinted by its 'protocol' tag.) And a processor/socket
can have many processors/connectors subscribing to data it outputs.

### Behind the scene

Technically, a processor sends document data to its sockets. The sockets send documents to its connected connectors.
A connector has a queue of incoming items, and a thread that pulls documents off the queue and sends it to
a processing method in the processor class. This method processes the data and sends the result to one or
more of its sockets, which again send to connected connectors...

A generator style processor has another thread that generates documents somehow, and sends it to its socket(s).

### Listen to output

Analogous with the processor.put(doc) command, you might also want to listen to output from a processor in your
program. You can do this by adding a 'callback' for the socket. For example like this

```python
output = []
processor.add_callback(lambda processor, doc: output.append(doc), socket_name)
...
processor.start()
processor.wait()
print output
```

or instead of the lambda function, use a method that takes a processor and document as an argument, e.g.:

```python
def do_stuff(processor, document):
print "I spy with my little eye, a document containing:", document

...
processor.add_callback(do_stuff)
...
```

### Events

You can register methods to listen to events. The following events can be subscribed to:

```python
event_started
event_stopped
event_aborted
```

You register a method that takes no a processor as arguments like so

```python
def myfunc(processor)
print "Processor '%s' started" % processor.name

myproc.event_started.append(myfunc)
```

### Protocol compliance

When sockets and connector are joined ("connected"), there is a check for protocol compliance. These are string
tags using a dot-notation for specializations. A terminal is registered with 'any' if it doesn't care about the
protocol. Explanation by some examples:

```text
SOCKET PROTOCOL CONNECTOR PROTOCOL WILL MATCH?
--------------- ------------------ -----------
seating.chair seating.chair yes (of course)
seating.chair.armchair seating yes, connector accepts any seating
seating seating.chair.armchair no, connector expects armchairs, specifically
any string yes (but, consumer: beware! it might be anything!)
string any yes, we accept anything
```

### Members for using the Processor (and derivates)

```text
Read/write:
keepalive
Read only:
accepting
stopping
running
suspended
aborted
Event lists:
event_started
event_stopped
event_aborted
Methods:
__init__(name) # Constructor/init
subscribe(producer=None, socket_name=None, connector_name=None)
unsubscribe(producer=None, socket_name=None, connector_name=None)
attach(subscriber, socket_name=None, connector_name=None)
detach(subscriber, socket_name=None, connector_name=None)
connector_info(*args) # returns list
socket_info(*args) # returns list
start()
stop()
abort()
suspend()
resume()
wait()
put(document, connector_name=None)
add_callback(method, socket_name=None)
Methods for debugging:
DUMP
DUMP_connectors
DUMP_sockets
```

## Writing your own Processor

The simple processor (not Generator type) typically has one or more connectors. A connector receives data from
a socket, or from a "processor.put(document, connector_name)" statement (which in turn puts the data on the
connector queue). Internally, a connector has a queue and is running a its own thread that pulls items off the
queue and executes whatever method is registered with the connector.

Any object passed to such a method is considered to be read-only. You *may* alter it, preferably only add to it.
But it is generally a bad idea, since many processors could potentially receive the same object. If you want to
pass it on to a socket as-is, that's fine. And it is the best performance wise. But if you need to alter it,
you should consider creating a deep or shallow clone. Shallow clones are fine if you just want to change one
part of the object and refer to the rest as it is.

As a general rule of thumb you should never alter the state members yourself directly. If you want to have
the processor stop or abort itself, you should call "self.stop()" or "self.abort()".

### A simple processor

Let's start with a simple processor that receives input on a connector and writes its processed output to a socket.
Let's make a processor that reverses and optionally swaps the casing of a string.

```python
from eslib import Processor

class StringReverser(Processor):

def __init__(self, **kwargs):
super(StringReverser, self).__init__(**kwargs)

self.config.set_default(swapcase = False)
```

Notice **kwargs, the "swapcase" config variable and the already instantiated config class. It is meant for
containing config variables. The incoming keyword arguments are put into the config as attributes. We *must* set
default values for all the config variables we want to use inside the processor, as this is also a way to define
their existence, should they not come in as keyword arguments. Otherwise, we risk getting exceptions when try to
use them.

In this case we will set "swapcase" if we want to swap the casing of the string we are reversing.

We also create a connector for the input and two sockets for the output. One is a pure pass-through while the
other provides the modified output:

```python
self.create_connector(self._incoming, "input", "str")
self.create_socket("original", "str")
self.create_socket("modified", "str")
```

We use "str" as a protocol tag. This is not the same as a Python type; it is simply a hint. When connecting
sockets and connectors there is check for protocol compliance. If you want to expect or spew out anything, simply
specify None or omit the protocol specification.

The following member methods are called when the processor starts or stops (including getting aborted),
respectively:

```python
def on_open(self): pass # Before threads are spun up.
def on_abort(self): pass # After call to abort(), but before closing with on_close()
def on_close(self): pass # Final call after stopping/aborting processor; always called
```

This is typically used for opening and closing files, establishing remote connections, resetting counters, etc.

For this example, there is nothing special we want to do when starting and stopping. (Really, starting the
processor in this case simply spins up the connector, that will deliver documents to our "_incoming(document)"
method as soon as it can. So now on to this method:

```python
def _incoming(self, document):
# TODO: You might want to check if the document is indeed a 'str' or 'unicode' here...

s = document[::-1] # Reverse the string of characters
if self.config.swapcase:
s = s.swapcase()

# Write to the sockets:
self.sockets["original"].send(document) # Incoming document, unmodified
self.sockets["modified"].send(s)
```

Often, processing can be quite heavy stuff, and quite unnecessary to do a lot of work with producing output if
there are no consumers. Therefore, you might want to first check if there is actually any consumers expecting
output either for the entire processor or per socket, with

```python
if not self.has_output:
return

# or

if self.sockets["modified"].has_output:
# calculate and send the stuff...
```

### Useful members for implementing simple Processors

```text
Methods for you to implement:
__init__(name=None) # constructor; remember to call super(your_class, self).__init__(name)
on_open() # called before starting execution threads
on_abort() # called after a processor receives a call to abort(), but before on_close()
on_close() # called when the processor has stopped or aborted
Read-only properties and variables:
name # name of the processor
config # object containing all configuration data for the processor
connectors # dict
sockets # dict
has_output # bool; indicating whether there are sockets with connections
log # logger; log processor events here
doclog # logger; log problems with documents here
Methods to call:
create_connector(method, name=None, protocol=None, description=None, is_default=False)
create_socket(name=None, description=None, is_default=False, mimic=None)
stop() # call this if you want to explicitly stop prematurely
abort() # call this if you want to explicitly abort prematurely
Properties and methods on sockets:
socket.has_output # bool; indicating whether the socket has connections (subscribers)
socket.send(document) # sends document to connected subscribers for asynchronous processing
```


### Default terminal

A connector can be set as default using the 'is_default' parameter or setting the 'default_connector' and
'default_socket'. There can only be one default connector and one default socket. This makes it possible
to address a terminal without name, which will then be routed to the default terminal. If only one socket
or connector exists, then that one also becomes the defacto default within its collection.

### Protocol "mimicing"

A processor can have a socket "mimic" protocol of connected connector. This is useful in a processing chain
A-B-C, where B massages the output from A and passes it on to C. A and C needs to have the same protocols on
their terminals, while B can be more general. Example:

```text
TwitterMonitor socket=tweet(esdoc.tweet)
=> HtmlRemover connector=input(esdoc) | socket=output(esdoc) mimic=input
=> TweetExtractor connector=tweet(esdoc.tweet)
```

Normal protocol compliance would dictate that TweetExtractor connector would require the more specific
'esdoc.tweet' protocol, while the HtmlRemover only outputs 'esdoc'. However, HtmlRemover has its output
socket set to 'mimic' its input connector. When we then attach the TwitterMonitor socket with protocol
'esdoc.tweet', the HtmlRemover's socket will mimic that protocol, and the TweetExtractor will accept it.

### Processor lifespan

A simple processor typically sits in between other processors in a pipeline or graph. They are started by
another processor earlier in the chain, and they are instructed to stop when a processor they are subscribing to
stops. So a processor C subscribing to A or B will stop if one of the other stops. Unless it is flagged with
"keepalive = True".

When stopping, the processor closes all its connectors for further input (by setting "connector.accept = False").
The connectors will then continue to work off their queues until empty, and then the processor are finally
stopped. For immediate termination without processing whatever is still queued up, an "abort()" must be called.

### Generators and Monitors

A 'Generator' is a Processor that is expected to produce its output mainly from other sources than what is coming
in through connectors. It has its own execution thread. For example, a FileWriter is a simple processor that
writes whatever it gets on its connector to a file. A FileReader has its own worker thread that reads lines from
files and generates documents as its output, and therefor implements Generator. An ElasticsearchWriter is a
Generator because it needs its own worker thread to gather up incoming documents and send them in batches to the
server for higher performance. So although they have the file and Elasticsearch writers have similar purposes,
they have different implementation schemes.

### Generator and Monitor lifespan

The Generator typically lives until it has consumed everything it was supposed to, such as reading parts of an
index, reading files, etc. Then it calls "stop()" on itself and its worker loop finishes.

A 'Monitor' implements Generator. The semantic difference is that the Monitor does not finish unless explicitly
stopped. It typically monitors an eternal stream of incoming data, for example tweets from Twitter or anything
from a message queueing system such as RabbitMQ.

### Additional useful members for implementing Generators and Monitors

```text
Read-only properties and variables:
accepting
stopping
running
suspended
aborted
end_tick_reason # True if there is a reason to exit on_tick; either 'aborted', 'stopping' or
# not 'running'; but (obs!!) it does not consider 'suspended'
Variables for you to update (if you like..):
total # typically total number of docs to generate (total DB entries, for example)
count # typically number of docs generated so far (e.g. to see progress towards total)
Methods for you to implement:
on_startup() # called at beginning of worker thread; on_open has already been called
on_shutdown() # called when stopping, but before stopped; your chance to finish up
on_tick() # called by worker thread; do all or parts of your stuff in here
on_suspend()
on_resume()
on_abort() # see comment, below
```

I'll go through the typical of these event handlers one by one, including the on_open() and on_close() methods,
in order of lifecycle chronological order.

#### on_open()

This is called when the processor starts, but before the worker thread starts.
Config verification, existence of external resources, etc, could be verified here.
Be aware that the processor should be able to start and stop and start again multiple times,
so lingering TCP connections, locked files, your own performance counters and state variables,
etc, must be accounted for.

#### on_startup()

This is called after the worker thread has started, but before we enter the run loop. This is
another place for initialization logic. What you do here might as well have been placed in on_open(),
but not vice versa. This is typically not the place to verify config variables or raise exceptions.
Do that in on_open(). But this is a logical place to host the code that is the reverse of the
"shutdown" code.

This method is called at the beginning of the worker thread. No on_tick or other generator events
will be called before it has completed. It is NOT GUARANTEED to have finished before
connectors start delivering documents. on_open, however, is always called before connectors are started."

#### on_tick()

This is the tricky one...

The simplest way is to have setup and shutdown done outside the tick, and handle small pieces each time
you get a call to this method. Pretty much all the time, unless suspended. This way you will not have to handle
the 'suspended' status, either.

If you want to handle everything yourself, you need to check the 'suspended' status, and whether it is time to
stop handling the tick, summarized in the boolean property 'end_tick_reason'. Here are three different examples
of how this is handled:

ElasticsearchReader: This does both setup and cleanup from inside on_tick(). It checks for 'end_tick_reason'
and sleeps while suspended.

RabbitmqMonitor: Starts listening from on_startup(). It processes as much as it can get from the queue in on_tick()
and also handles reconnect attempts there if necessary. Then it returns to the run loop in the generator.
Stop and abort events call the pika API and tells it to cancel further consumption so the on_tick loop does
not need to handle this. Suspension is also handled between the "ticks", but we need to cancel and restart
consumption between suspend/resume events.

FileReader: The file reader can read from one or more files, one entire file or one line per file generating
a document (configurable behaviour). It relies on a revisit to the on_tick() method for each new file that
needs to be processed, and opens the new file and starts reading. It burns through files a line at a time if
so configured, but it also checks whether there is an 'end_tick_reason' or a 'suspend'. In which case it
returns to the main run loop, only to be revisited later to pick up reading from where it was. Any potentially
open file (due to a premature stop() or abort()) is closed in on_close().

#### on_suspend() / on_resume()

In case you want to do something special when suspend or resume has happened. Most often you would probably
just watch the 'suspended' status in the on_tick() method instead.

#### on_shutdown()

When the generator receives a stop() command, it enters 'stopping' mode before it actually stops. This method
is called when the generator is stopping. (If you handle the stopping status yourself inside the on_tick()
method, then you do not have to handle it here.)

After this method exits, the generator registeres that production has stopped from this worker thread.
Is still 'stopping', however, until all connector queues finished processing and are empty. Only then is the
processor truly considered to be finished, and the worker thread exits.

The next and final event call will now be to on_close().

__NOTE:__
If your on_tick() method calls another blocking method to retrieve its data, e.g. from a Python generator
loop, you might have to go in the back door and switch off the lights for that generator. You can do this by
overriding the stop() method like in this (awful) example from TwitterMonitor:

```python
def stop(self):
if self.stopping or not self.running:
return
if self._twitter_response:
self.log.info("Closing connection to Twitter stream.")
self._twitter_response.response.raw._fp.close() # *sigh*...

super(TwitterMonitor, self).stop()
```

#### on_abort()

This is called after all processing is supposed to have stopped, after leaving the on_tick() method. But the
thread is still running, but will be terminated right after this method is called. Whether you clean up in
on_abort() or on_close() doesn't matter much most of the time. But it can be used to separate normal shutdown
logic from abortion logic and keep the common code in on_close().

#### on_close()

This is called after the worker thread and all process requests from connectors have stopped.
Consider this the final operation, but be aware that the processor can be restarted, so all must be
cleaned up and ready to go again.

### Ad-hoc Processor

Say you have a processor "p1" and "p2" that pass a string (here tagged with protocol "str") from one to the other,
and you want to reverse that string with a processor in the middle, but you don't want to bother with making
another class. This is how you do it:

```python
p1 = ...
p2 = ...

def reverse(document):
socket = send(document[::-1]

middle = Processor(name="ad-hoc")
middle.create_connector(reverse, "input", protocol="str")
socket = middle.create_socket("output", protocol="str")

p1.attach(middle.attach(p2))
p1.start()
p2.wait()
```

# SERVICE DOCUMENTATION

## The idea

The idea behind "services" is to easily administer a number of document processing process ("services").
These services can exchange data between them through messaging queues or other means.

The eslib service framework offers service configuration through a config file, logging and log
configuration, metadata handling and command line commands for managing the services.

## TODO: Usage

### TODO: Configuration and directory structure

```
service
├── bin/
│   ├── init.sh
│   ├── launcher
│   └── manager
├── config/
│   ├── credentials.yaml
│   ├── logging-console.yaml
│   ├── logging.yaml
│   └── services.yaml
└── log/
└── source/
```

### TODO: Running services

* es-service
* es-run
* es-meta

## TODO: The manager

* storage

## Metadata

Metadata is the data that the services need for runtime (re)configuration. It is not the static
service configuration that describes how the service should be set up and ran, but rather the
data that is expected to change while the services are running. Multiple services will share the
same metadata.

Metadata exists in committed "change sets". The manager keeps one change set active, and another
for editing. Once a change set is committed it becomes active, and all dependent services are
updated with the new set. A new change set then becomes the current one for editing.

It is possible to roll back to a previous change set. It will then become the active set, and all
dependent services will be updated.

### Subscription and Exchange

Services that subscribe to metadata do so by enlisting the metadata keys as a list of strings with
dot notation that addresses the metadata sections. These are registered with the manager when the
service communicates the initial 'hello' message, as 'meta_keys'. The metadata requested is
initially returned as part of the 'hello' message response, under 'metadata'. After that it is updated
by a call from the manager (or other..) via the service's 'metadata' interface.

Example subscription registration in 'hello' message:

```json
"meta_keys": ["twitter.terms"]
```

Example payload in 'hello':

```json
"metadata": {
"version": "12345",
"data": {
"twitter": {
"terms": ["watch", "these", "terms"]
}
}
}
```

A service that is dependent on metadata cannot start until it receives the data. If it is missing for
some reason, then the service should be in the 'pending' state.

### Metadata addressing

Metadata is addressed using dot notation to find the node. When the node contains lists of data we
can select a subset of it by listing constraints after the path. The constraint separator is the
pipe (|) character. E.g.

```
mytuff.users|domain:twitter
```


## TODO: Manager REST API


### TODO: Service operations


## TODO: Service/manager communication (REST interface)

### Metadata exchange

You should not normally have to bother with any of this yourself, but for the record...

When a (HTTP) service is started, it sends a `/hello` message to the manager, containing (among other things)
the list of `meta_keys` to subscribe to. The server responds with a section (among other things)
called `metadata`, where the requested metadata lie.

When the manager has an update that the service subscribes to, it will send that via an HTTP POST
message to the service's `/metadata` endpoint.

You can check what metadata a service holds by querying the same endpoint with a GET request, e.g.

```
curl -XGET http://10.0.0.4:4027/metadata | jq .
```


## TODO: Writing services

* big section...

### Metadata integration

When you inherit from `Service`, there is a class level attribute `metadata_keys`. This is a
list where you can specify the keys (paths with constraints) that you want your service to
subscribe to updates on. E.g.

```
meadata_keys = ["twitter.keywords", "users|domain:twitter"]
```

Then when you override the method

```
on_metadata(self, metadata)
```

you will receive a message from the server when there is changes to your data.
You can then easily pick te parts you want with `dicthelp.get`, like this:

```
from eslib.service import dicthelp

def on_metadata(self, metadata):
kwds = dicthelp.get(metadata, "twitter.keywords")
...
```

## Integrating with the service manager (from external applications)

### Metadata management

The following HTTP commands are available

```
HTTP verb Path URL query params
---------- ------------------------------ ----------------
GET /meta/list
PUT|POST /meta/commit
PUT|POST /meta/rollback/{version:int}
DELETE /meta/drop{version:int}
PUT|POST /meta/import ?commit:bool, ?message:str
GET /meta/{?version} ?path:str
PUT|POST /meta/put ?path:str, ?merge:bool
DELETE /meta/remove
DELETE /meta/delete
```

In the list above, a question mark means 'optional' and a type is specified with ':type'.

### HTTP command body format

#### commit

``json
{
"description": message
}
```

#### commit

```json
{
"description": message
}
```

#### remove

```json
{
"path" : message,
"list" : list_of_terms
}
```

#### delete

```json
{
"paths" : list_of_paths,
"collapse": true|false
}
```

### Examples

#### Import

Import overwrites the entire edit set. It must be committed afterwards
to become active, unless the commit flag is set in the query options.

If you want to add or update parts of the edit set, use the 'put' command instead.

```sh
url -XGET http://localhost:4000/meta/import?commit=false&message=
```

```json
{
"hello":
{
"target": "world"
},
"groups":
[
{
"id": "group_a",
"terms": [1, 2, 3]
},
{
"id": "group_b",
"terms": [4, 5]
}
],
"users":
[
{
"domain": "twitter",
"username": "user_a",
"user_id": "a",
},
{
"domain": "twitter",
"username": "user_b",
"user_id": "b",
},
{
"domain": "facebook",
"username": "user_c",
"user_id": "c",
}
]
}
```

### Commit

```bs
curl -XPOST http://localhost:4000/meta/commit
```

Optional body:

```json
{
"description": "Commiting edit to active set once again."
}
```

#### Add or replace entire section

```bs
curl -XPOST http://localhost:4000/meta/put
```

Body:

```json
{
"groups":
[
{
"id": "group_a",
"terms": ["a", "b"]
},
{
"id": "group_b",
"terms": ["c", "d", "e"]
}
]
}
```

#### Add or replace specific objects

```bs
curl -XPOST http://localhost:4000/meta/put
```

Body:

```json
{
"groups|id:group_a":
{
"id": "group_a",
"terms": ["a", "b"]
},
"groups|id:group_b":
{
"id": "group_b",
"terms": ["c", "d", "e"]
}
}
```

#### Add or replace (unique) elements in array

```bs
curl -XPOST http://localhost:4000/meta/put?merge=true
```

Body:

```json
{
"groups|id:group_a",
"terms": ["e", "f"]
}
```

#### Delete sections

```bs
curl -XDELETE http://localhost:4000/meta/delete
```

Body:

```json
{
"paths" : ["groups", "users"]
}
```

#### Delete objects by filter

```bs
curl -XDELETE http://localhost:4000/meta/delete
```

Body:

```json
{
"paths" : ["groups|id:group_a", "users|domain:twitter"]
}
```

#### Remove terms from array

This command is less useful than the others, in that it cannot address a field
within filtered objects, e.g. you cannot first address "groups|id:group_a" and
then remove items from that object's "terms" array.

```bs
curl -XDELETE http://localhost:4000/meta/remove
```

Body:

```json
{
"path": "myarray",
"list": ["b", "c"]
}
```
Release History

Release History

0.0.14

This version

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.13

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.12

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.11

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.10

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.9

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.8

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.7

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.6

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.5

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

Show More

0.0.4

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.0.2

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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Download Files

Download Files

TODO: Brief introduction on what you do with files - including link to relevant help section.

File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
eslib-0.0.14.tar.gz (139.1 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Aug 3, 2016

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