Skip to main content

Preserve the content of your files and directories during testing.

Project description

File Guard: Preserve The Content Of Files and Directories

Protect the content of your files and directories in a certain scope. In that scope, you can change the contents of the file/directory as you wish. After the scope has ended, the original contents of the file(s) and/or directory(ies) will be restored. The "scope" can either be a with block or a function/method.

Below is an example of guarding the contents of the allure.txt file. Inside the with guard('allure.txt') block, the content of the file is changed. However, after its scope ends, the previous content of the file is restored:

>>> from fileguard import guard
>>> with open('allure.txt', 'r') as f:
        print(f.read())

The allure of breaking the law
Was always too much for me to ever ignore
>>> with guard('allure.txt'):
        with open('allure.txt', 'w') as f:
           f.write('Still Dre Day')

        with open('allure.txt', 'r') as f:
            print(f.read())

Still Dre Day
>>> with open('allure.txt', 'r') as f:
        print(f.read())

The allure of breaking the law
Was always too much for me to ever ignore

Installation

To install fileguard, simply use pip:

pip install fileguard

Requirements

  • Python 3.6+. It should work on other Python 3.X versions too.

This library has no external dependencies.

Where and When Is FileGuard Useful?

This library is useful in various scenarios, specially in testing, as it allows you to save a lot of boilerplate and error-prone code.

For example, let's say that the program that you are developing reads an writes to a configuration file. In your tests, you manually create a configuration file and then want to test that your program interacts with it in the expected manner.

In one of your test functions you want to write tests for when the a function that updates the configuration file with invalid data and then your program reads it in. In another test function you want to test that the program does not crash if the configuration file is deleted. Another test function tests the case where a deleted configuration file is updated. In yet another test function you want to test that changing the contents of the configuration file works as expected. You are only interested in testing how your program reacts to changes of the configuration file in the scope of each one of those test functions. After those, you want the contents of the original configuration file to be restored.

If done manually you have two options:

  • write boilerplate code to back up and restore the contents of the file before and after each test function, respectively
  • have a lot of copies of configuration files (one for invalid data, one with empty data, one with non-existent data, etc). At the end, you would still be left with the task of restoring the contents of the edited/deleted files

Keep in mind, that the example described above is rather simple. What if:

  • you want to preserve the contents of multiple files
  • you want to preserve the contents, not just of a file, but of the whole directory
  • you're not dealing with UTF-8 encoded text files, but rather with binaries, music files, images, etc
  • you want to preserve the contents of the file in a scope inside a function (e.g. within an with block) and not the of the whole function

All of those add complexity to the error-prone boilerplate code and make it dirty, complex, hard to maintain and confusing.

The fileguard library allows you to tackle those problems in a clean, Pythonic way. All you have to do is decorate the test function with @guard

API Documentation and Examples

In the text that follows, "fileguarded" means that the contents of the file(s) and/or directory(ies) will be preserved. In other words, their content after the end of the scope will be the same as it was right before the beginning of the scope.

In order to use fileguard, all you have to do is import guard:

from fileguard import guard

guard can be used as a:

  • function/method decorator

    • the scope of the function will be file-guarded
    @guard('my_file.txt')
    def change_my_file():
      # Within this function, change the contents of the file as you wish.
      # You can even delete it.
      # After the function has executed, 'my_file.txt's contents will be
      #   the same as they were right before the execution of this function.
    
  • class decorator

    • all of the user-defined methods will be file-guarded. The following two code snippets are equivalent:
    @guard('my_file.txt')
    class MyClass(object):
    
      def __init__(self, my_arg_1, my_arg_2):
        self._my_arg_1 = my_arg_1
        self._my_arg_2 = my_arg_2
    
      def my_method_1(self):
        # code here
    
      def my_method_2(self):
        # code here
    
    class MyClass(object):
    
      def __init__(self, my_arg_1, my_arg_2):
        self._my_arg_1 = my_arg_1
        self._my_arg_2 = my_arg_2
    
      @guard('my_file.txt')
      def my_method_1(self):
        # code here
    
      @guard('my_file.txt')
      def my_method_2(self):
        # code here
    
  • context manager

    • all of the code within the with block is file-guarded, including calls to functions that change the contents of the fileguarded files and directories.
    with guard('my_file.txt'):
      # Within "with" block, change the contents of the file as you wish.
      # You can even delete it.
      # After the "with" scope has ended, 'my_file.txt's contents will be
      #   the same as they were right before the execution of this with block.
    

What If The File/Directory Is Deleted?

  • The files will be restored, even if you delete them.

  • The complete contents of the directory will be restored, even if you delete the whole directory or some files from within it.

Arguments

guard() accepts the list of files and directories to fileguard. It can take a single argument:

@guard('file.txt')
def my_function(arg1, arg2):
  # code here

or multiple ones:

@guard('file_1.txt', 'file_2.txt')
def my_function(arg1, arg2):
  # code here

the snippet above is equivalent to:

@guard('file_2.txt')
@guard('file_1.txt')
def my_function(arg1, arg2):
  # code here

In that case, the contents of all of the files passed as argument will be fileguarded.

You can pass a file, a directory or a mixture of them as an arguments:

@guard('file_1.txt', 'directory_1', '/home/iluxonchik/directory_2', '/home/iluxonchik/file_2.txt')
def my_function(arg1, arg2):
  # code here

In that case, the contents of the file ./file_1.txt, directory ./directory_1, directory /home/iluxonchik/directory_2 and file /home/iluxonchik/file_2.txt will be fileguarded.

The fileguarded files and directories do not need to exist at the moment of decoration. You can fileguard a file or directory in function, method and or a class (by decorating it with guard()), without that file or directory existing yet. You have to make sure that the file exists when the decorated function or method is executed. If, however, you are using guard() as a context manager, you have to make sure that the protected file or directory does exist at the moment when you use with guard():

Supported File Types

Any file type is supported. You can guard a text file, a binary, an music file, an image file, a video file, etc. Under the hood, the original file is backed up by its copy.

Directories

Just like files, directories can contain arbitrary files. The original directory and its contents will be restored. Under the hood, the original directory is backed up by a copy of all of its contents.

File-Guarded Functions Calling File-Guarded Functions (Nested Calls)

The backup order is preserved. Internally, a stack is used. The best way to illustrate this is with an example.

Let's consider that you have a file lets_ride.txt with the following content:

        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre

Also, fileguard_demo.py contents are as follows:

""" Contents of fileguard_demo.py"""

from fileguard import guard

def print_file_content():
    with open('lets_ride.txt', 'r') as f:
        print(f.read())

def append_text_to_file(text):
    with open('lets_ride.txt', 'a') as f:
            f.write(text)

@guard('lets_ride.txt')
def change_file_1():
    print('Content before change_file_1:')
    print_file_content()

    append_text_to_file('\tSame Chronic, just a different smoke\n')

    print('Content after change_file_1:')
    print_file_content()

@guard('lets_ride.txt')
def change_file_2():
    print('Content before change_file_2:')
    print_file_content()

    append_text_to_file('\tSame Impala, different spokes\n')

    change_file_1()

    print('Content after change_file_2:')
    print_file_content()

@guard('lets_ride.txt')
def change_file_3():
    print('Content before change_file_3:')
    print_file_content()

    append_text_to_file('\tYou would say I was The New Dre\n')

    change_file_2()

    print('Content after change_file_3:')
    print_file_content()

print('Intial file content:')
print_file_content()

with guard('lets_ride.txt'):
    print('Content before with:')
    print_file_content()

    change_file_3()

    print('Content after with:')
    print_file_content()

print('Final file content:')
print_file_content()

The output of running python fileguard_demo.py is the following:

Intial file content:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre

Content before with:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre

Content before change_file_3:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre

Content before change_file_2:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre
        You would say I was The New Dre

Content before change_file_1:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre
        You would say I was The New Dre
        Same Impala, different spokes

Content after change_file_1:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre
        You would say I was The New Dre
        Same Impala, different spokes
        Same Chronic, just a different smoke

Content after change_file_2:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre
        You would say I was The New Dre
        Same Impala, different spokes

Content after change_file_3:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre
        You would say I was The New Dre

Content after with:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre

Final file content:
        It’s a new day, and if you ever knew Dre

Project details


Release history Release notifications

Download files

Download the file for your platform. If you're not sure which to choose, learn more about installing packages.

Filename, size & hash SHA256 hash help File type Python version Upload date
fileguard-0.0.1-py3-none-any.whl (6.3 kB) Copy SHA256 hash SHA256 Wheel py3
fileguard-0.0.1.tar.gz (7.9 kB) Copy SHA256 hash SHA256 Source None

Supported by

Elastic Elastic Search Pingdom Pingdom Monitoring Google Google BigQuery Sentry Sentry Error logging AWS AWS Cloud computing DataDog DataDog Monitoring Fastly Fastly CDN SignalFx SignalFx Supporter DigiCert DigiCert EV certificate StatusPage StatusPage Status page