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Git wrapper redacting author and committer dates.

Project description

Latest version on PyPI Supported Python versions Build Status

git-privacy: Keep your coding hours private

git-privacy redacts author and committer dates to keep your coding hours more private. You can choose the level of redaction: only remove minutes and seconds from your dates or even hide day or month. The original dates are encrypted and stored in the commit message in case you might need them.

Installation

git-privacy can be easily installed via pip:

$ pip3 install gitprivacy

Note: git-privacy requires Python version 3.6 or later and Git version 2.22.0 or later.

Getting Started

You can either setup git-privacy separately for selected Git repositories or globally so that each new Git repo automatically uses git-privacy from the beginning.

To setup git-privacy for a single Git repository do the following:

  1. Initialise git-privacy, which sets the necessary hooks.

    $ git-privacy init
    
  2. Set a redaction pattern from the following options:

    • M: Sets the month to January
    • d: Sets the day to the first day of the month
    • h: Sets the hour to midnight
    • m: Sets the minute to zero (full hour)
    • s: Sets the seconds to zero (full minute)
    $ git config privacy.pattern <pattern>
    

    For example:

    $ git config privacy.pattern hms
    
  3. Set an encryption key if you want to preserve the original timestamps in encrypted form in the commit message. If no key is set, only the reduced timestamp will remain.

    $ git-privacy keys --init
    

    For more information about managing encryption keys see git-privacy keys -h.

  4. Use Git as normal ;-)

To setup git-privacy globally for all new repositories do the following:

  1. Initialise git-privacy to set the necessary hooks globally (in a Git template directory).

    $ git-privacy init --global
    
  2. Set a global redaction pattern from the following options:

    • M: Sets the month to January
    • d: Sets the day to the first day of the month
    • h: Sets the hour to midnight
    • m: Sets the minute to zero (full hour)
    • s: Sets the seconds to zero (full minute)
    $ git config --global privacy.pattern <pattern>
    

    For example:

    $ git config --global privacy.pattern hms
    
  3. Use Git to init or clone repos as usual and git-privacy will redact timestamps for you :-)

  4. Per individual repo: Set an encryption key if you want to preserve the original timestamps in encrypted form in the commit message. If no key is set, only the reduced timestamp will remain.

    $ git-privacy keys --init
    

    For more information about managing encryption keys see git-privacy keys -h.

For an overview of further features and options read the following sections.

Usage

Redaction of New Commits

New commits are automatically redacted if git-privacy is initialised in a repo. This is achieved via a post-commit hook.

If you want to manually redact the last commit, run:

$ git-privacy redate --only-head

Bulk Re-dating of Commits

To redact and redate all commits of the currently active branch run:

$ git-privacy redate

Warning: This will likely rewrite the Git history and might lead to diverging commit histories. See A Warning about Git History Rewriting.

Note: git-privacy warns you if you attempt to redate commits that have already been pushed to a remote. However, you can force it to do so anyway.

Re-dating of Commits from a Startpoint

You can also limit the redate to all commits that succeed a given startpoint:

$ git-privacy redate <startpoint>

This will redate all commits in the range <startpoint>..HEAD (see git rev-list for syntax details).

For example, you can use this to redate all commits of a branch since it has been branched off from master by invoking:

$ git-privacy redate master

View Unredacted Dates

To view the unredacted commit dates, git-privacy offers a git-log-like listing:

$ git-privacy log

Note: Unredacted dates are only preserved if you set an encryption key which allows git-privacy to store the encrypted dates in the commit message.

Redate after Rebases and other Rewrites

Some Git operations like git rebase or git commit --amend rewrite existing commits. Consequently, a new commit date is set for those commit. git-privacy takes notice of such rewrites via a post-rewrite hook, logs them and alerts you that unredated commit dates have been introduced to the repository, as shown in the following example:

$ git rebase -i HEAD~2
Rebasing (1/2)
Rebasing (2/2)
A rewrite may have inserted unredacted committer dates.
To apply date redaction on these dates run

git-privacy redate-rewrites

Warning: This alters your Git history.
Successfully rebased and updated refs/heads/master.

To redate the rewritten commits run, as mentioned:

$ git-privacy redate-rewrites

Warning: This will rewrite the Git history again and can lead to diverging commit histories. See A Warning about Git History Rewriting.

Time Zone Change Warnings

Git commit dates include your current system time zone. These time zones might leak information about your travel activities. git-privacy warns you about any changes in your system time zone since your last commit. By default, this is just a warning. You can set git-privacy to prevent commits with changed time zone by running

$ git-privacy init --timezone-change=abort

or by setting the privacy.ignoreTimezone switch in the Git config to False.

Email Address Redaction

Imagine you want to publish a repository which contains some contributor's private email addresses. git-privacy makes it easy to redact such addresses:

$ git-privacy redact-email john@example.com paul@example.net

You can also specify individual substitutes:

$ git-privacy redact-email john@example.com:john@bigfirm.invalid

Or, you can use your GitHub username and GitHub's noreply addresses to still have your commit associated to your account and get credit:

$ git-privacy redact-email -g john@example.com:john

Configuration Options

git-privacy takes the following configuration options via git-config.

privacy.ignoreTimezone

If true, git-privacy will only warn you if your timezone has changed since your last commit. If false, it will abort the commit. Default is true.

Note: This requires that the pre-commit hook is set by git-privacy init.

privacy.limit

If set, redacted timestamps will be rounded towards the given interval. The format is hh-hh where hh is a value between 0 and 24.

Example: limit = 9-17 means that commits at 17:30 (5:30pm) are set to 17:00. By default limits are disabled.

privacy.mode

Currently, only the reduce mode is supported. Default is reduce.

privacy.password

Deprecated: Since version 2.0, git-privacy uses key files to encrypt dates and will automatically migrate from passwords to the new format.

This specifies the password used to encrypt the original timestamps. If no password is given, original timestamps will not be preserved.

privacy.pattern

This option specifies the extend of the timestamp reduction applied by git-privacy. The reduction pattern is a string that can comprise the following characters:

Character Meaning
M Sets the month to January
d Sets the day to the first day of the month
h Sets the hour to midnight
m Sets the minute to zero (full hour)
s Sets the seconds to zero (full minute)

If no pattern is specified, git-privacy will abort.

privacy.replacements

If true, git-privacy creates a replacement mapping (git-replace(1)) for each commit that is rewritten by a redate. Default is false.

privacy.salt

Deprecated: Since version 2.0, git-privacy uses key files to encrypt dates and will automatically migrate to the new format.

This is an auto-generated value created by git-privacy if password is set by the user. It should not be altered by the user.

A Warning about Git History Rewriting

Author and committer timestamps are part of the commit object and therefore part of the input that determines the commit hash (the commit's SHA1 value). Consequently, every modification to a timestamp changes the commit hash. And since Git uses hash chains, it also changes all commits that build an that commit, i.e., that have it as an ancestor.

Example: Consider the commit sequence a<-b<-c. If you now redate b, c will also be rewritten under a new commit hash resulting into: a<-b'<-c'. If b and c were just commits in your local repository, you're probably fine. But if b or c have been shared with other developers (e.g., by pushing to a remote), your histories have diverged and you can no longer easily merge changes from remote. Do not force-push unless you absolutely know what you are doing!

To avoid diverging histories git-privacy rejects redates of commits that are part of any known remote branch. But you can still run into locally diverging histories, e.g., if you redate after you have branched of a branch for a feature development. So keep this in mind when calling git-privacy redate manually. Using the automatic redating of new commits by the post-commit hook or by the --only-head option should be safe for standard setups.

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