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A python library for programmatically creating and editing Minecraft data packs

Project description

mcpack

Build Status PyPI PyPI - Python Version

A python library for programmatically creating and editing Minecraft data packs. Requires python 3.7.

from mcpack import DataPack, Function

pack = DataPack('My cool pack', 'This is the description of my pack.')

pack['my_cool_pack:hello'] = Function(
    'say Hello, world!\n'
    'give @s minecraft:dead_bush\n'
)

pack.dump('.minecraft/saves/New World/datapacks')

Installation

Make sure that you're using python 3.7 or above. The package can be installed with pip.

$ pip install mcpack

Using mcpack

Check out the examples for a quick overview.

Creating a data pack

The DataPack class represents a minecraft data pack.

from mcpack import DataPack

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')

print(pack.name)  # 'Test'
print(pack.description)  # 'Test description.'
print(pack.pack_format)  # 1
print(pack.namespaces)  # defaultdict(<class 'mcpack.Namespace'>, {})

You can load already existing data packs using the load class method.

from mcpack import DataPack

pack = DataPack.load('.minecraft/save/New World/datapacks/Test')

The dump method allows you to generate the actual Minecraft data pack. The method will raise a ValueError if the data pack already exists. You can explicitly overwrite the existing data pack by setting the overwrite argument to True.

from mcpack import DataPack

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')

pack.dump('.minecraft/save/New World/datapacks')
pack.dump('.minecraft/save/New World/datapacks', overwrite=True)

Namespaces

Namespace objects hold references to data pack items using a separate dictionary for each type of item.

from mcpack import Namespace

namespace = Namespace()

print(namespace.advancements)  # {}
print(namespace.functions)  # {}
print(namespace.loot_tables)  # {}
print(namespace.recipes)  # {}
print(namespace.structures)  # {}
print(namespace.block_tags)  # {}
print(namespace.item_tags)  # {}
print(namespace.fluid_tags)  # {}
print(namespace.function_tags)  # {}
print(namespace.entity_type_tags)  # {}

You can add namespaces to DataPack objects using the namespaces attribute. Note that you won't usually need to create namespaces yourself. If you want to edit a namespace, you just need to retrieve it and the defaultdict will create an empty namespace for you if it doesn't already exist.

from mcpack import DataPack

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')

print(pack.namespaces['test'])  # Namespace(...)

To make things even more convenient, the __getitem__ and __setitem__ methods of DataPack objects are mapped to the namespaces attribute. It means that you can access namespaces directly from the DataPack object.

print(pack['test'])  # Namespace(...)

Adding items to namespaces is pretty straight-forward. Simply add them to their respective dictionaries.

from mcpack import (DataPack, Advancement, Function, LootTable, Recipe,
                    Structure, BlockTag, ItemTag, FluidTag, FunctionTag,
                    EntityTypeTag)

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')

pack['test'].advancements['foo'] = Advancement(...)
pack['test'].functions['foo/spam'] = Function(...)
pack['test'].loot_tables['foo/egg'] = LootTable(...)
pack['test'].recipes['bar'] = Recipe(...)
pack['test'].structures['bar/spam'] = Structure(...)
pack['test'].block_tags['bar/egg'] = BlockTag(...)
pack['test'].item_tags['baz'] = ItemTag(...)
pack['test'].fluid_tags['baz/spam'] = FluidTag(...)
pack['test'].function_tags['baz/egg'] = FunctionTag(...)
pack['test'].entity_type_tags['qux'] = EntityTypeTag(...)

You can also use the DataPack object directly. The __setitem__ method actually checks if the key looks like namespace:path and dispatches the item automatically. We can now simplify the previous piece of code quite a bit.

from mcpack import (DataPack, Advancement, Function, LootTable, Recipe,
                    Structure, BlockTag, ItemTag, FluidTag, FunctionTag,
                    EntityTypeTag)

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')

pack['test:foo'] = Advancement(...)
pack['test:foo/spam'] = Function(...)
pack['test:foo/egg'] = LootTable(...)
pack['test:bar'] = Recipe(...)
pack['test:bar/spam'] = Structure(...)
pack['test:bar/egg'] = BlockTag(...)
pack['test:baz'] = ItemTag(...)
pack['test:baz/spam'] = FluidTag(...)
pack['test:baz/egg'] = FunctionTag(...)
pack['test:qux'] = EntityTypeTag(...)

Advancements

Advancement objects represent Minecraft advancements.

from mcpack import DataPack, Advancement

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')
pack['test:foo'] = Advancement()

advancement = pack['test'].advancements['foo']

print(advancement.display)  # None
print(advancement.parent)  # None
print(advancement.criteria)  # {}
print(advancement.requirements)  # None
print(advancement.rewards)  # None

All the attributes can be set in the constructor. They mirror the root properties of the advancement JSON file format.

Check out the wiki for further details.

Functions

Function objects represent Minecraft functions.

from mcpack import DataPack, Function

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')
pack['test:foo'] = Function()

function = pack['test'].functions['foo']

print(function.body)  # ''

The body attribute can be set in the constructor. The body of the function corresponds to the content of the actual .mcfunction file.

Check out the wiki for further details.

Loot tables

LootTable objects represent Minecraft loot tables.

from mcpack import DataPack, LootTable

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')
pack['test:foo'] = LootTable()

loot_table = pack['test'].loot_tables['foo']

print(loot_table.pools)  # []

The pools attribute can be set in the constructor. It mirrors the pools property of the loot table JSON file format.

Check out the wiki for further details.

Recipes

Recipe objects represent Minecraft recipes.

from mcpack import DataPack, Recipe

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')
pack['test:foo'] = Recipe()

recipe = pack['test'].recipes['foo']

print(recipe.type)  # 'crafting_shaped'
print(recipe.group)  # None
print(recipe.pattern)  # []
print(recipe.key)  # {}
print(recipe.ingredient)  # None
print(recipe.ingredients)  # None
print(recipe.result)  # {}
print(recipe.experience)  # None
print(recipe.cookingtime)  # None

All the attributes can be set in the constructor. They mirror the root properties of the recipe JSON file format.

Check out the wiki for further details.

Structures

Structure objects represent Minecraft structures.

from mcpack import DataPack, Structure

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')
pack['test:foo'] = Structure()

structure = pack['test'].structures['foo']

print(structure.data_version)  # Int(1503)
print(structure.author)  # String('')
print(structure.size)  # List[Int]([0, 0, 0])
print(structure.palette)  # List[State]([])
print(structure.blocks)  # List[Block]([])
print(structure.entities)  # List[Entity]([])

All the attributes can be set in the constructor. They mirror the root properties of the structure NBT file format. mcpack uses nbtlib to manipulate nbt data. The Structure class inherits from an nbtlib schema that takes care of wrapping python values with the appropriate nbt tags.

Check out the wiki for further details.

Tags

BlockTag, ItemTag, FluidTag, FunctionTag and EntityTypeTag objects represent Minecraft block, item, fluid, function and entity type tags respectively. They are all identical in structure, the only difference between them is the namespace directory they get written to.

from mcpack import DataPack, BlockTag

pack = DataPack('Test', 'Test description.')
pack['test:foo'] = BlockTag()

block_tag = pack['test'].block_tags['foo']

print(block_tag.values)  # []
print(block_tag.replace)  # False

The values and replace attributes can be set in the constructor. They mirror the root properties of the tag JSON file format.

Check out the wiki for further details.

Contributing

Contributions are welcome. This project uses poetry so you'll need to install it first if you want to be able to work with the project locally.

$ curl -sSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/sdispater/poetry/master/get-poetry.py | python

You should now be able to install the required dependencies.

$ poetry install

You can run the tests with poetry run pytest.

$ poetry run pytest

License - MIT

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