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A Python Data Generator for Minecraft Modding

Project description

Minecraft Resource Generator

This is a python module aimed to enable simple generation of the many json files that are required for Minecraft modding.

Pack Format

Updates of this tool will track the latest pack format (pack_format in a resource pack) as soon as possible. In order to generate resources compliant with a specific pack format, the latest version can be found below

Pack Format Minecraft Version Range Latest mcresources Version
6 1.16.2 - Latest Latest
5 1.15 - 1.16.1 1.3.3
4 1.13 - 1.14.4 0.0.2

Usage

mcresources can build many common files that are required for modding, and provide utilities to manage a larger project. The following is an outline of the various methods and how to use them in the most efficient manner.

All files generated by mcresources will have a comment ('__comment__') inserted to identify them. This also allows mcresources via the usage of clean_generated_resources() to delete all files that have been generated, allowing the user to see which ones are created manually, and/or manage updating older files to a newer configuration

A few elements are common to multiple methods:

  • name_parts: This represents the resource location for a specific block or item. It can be specified as a string, i.e. 'block_ruby_ore', or as a list or tuple if the block uses directories as separators. This means that ('ore_blocks', 'ruby') corresponds to the resource location modid:ore_blocks/ruby, and the resulting file ruby.json would be found in modid/blockstates/ore_blocks/. An optional domain can also be specified (minecraft:stone), which will override the ResourceManagers domain if present.

  • conditions: A single condition can either be specified as a fully specified dictionary (which will be inserted into the json verbatim), or as a string, which will be expanded to { 'type': string_condition }

  • item stacks: An item stack can be specified as a fully specified dictionary (which will be inserted into the json verbatim), or as a string. As a string, it must represent an item resource location, i.e. minecraft:golden_boots will create the json { 'item': 'minecraft:golden_boots' }. Additionally, you can prefix the string with tag! to specify that it represents a tag, i.e. tag!forge:rods/wooden will create the json { 'tag': 'forge:rods/wooden' }

Contexts

When calling various ResourceManager methods, they will often return a context object, one of BlockContext, ItemContext, or RecipeContext. This object can be used as a shortcut to add other files for a single block or item, for instance, adding a blockstate, model, item block model, and loot table with only specifying the name once:

rm.blockstate(...).with_item_block_model(...).with_block_model(...)

Contexts can also be obtained directly by calling block(name_parts), or item(name_parts).

In addition, this delegated behavior also applies to tags. Tags no longer create single files every time the relevant tag method is called. Instead, they accumulate tag entries in a buffer, allowing multiple tag calls to append entries to a single tag.

In order to finalize tag (and lang / translation) entries, a call to ResourceManager#flush is necessary, which will clear the current buffer for tags and translation entries and write all relevant files.

Factory Methods

For common minecraft block models (slabs, stairs, etc.), there are a number of factory methods which can be used to produce vanilla style blockstates and models for a single block. These make standard assumptions about the parent block's textures and state properties. Currently, there are the following:

All of these methods take the form of a make_[block type] method that can be invoked on a BlockContext. For instance,

rm.block('myblock').make_slab()

These create the required block state, block and item models, adhering to vanilla style naming conventions and using vanilla base models. Thus adding standard block assets for wood or stone variants can be done simply.

The following methods are available:

  • make_slab()
  • make_stairs()
  • make_fence()
  • make_fence_gate()
  • make_wall()
  • make_door()
  • make_trapdoor()
  • make_button()
  • make_pressure_plate()

Resource Generators

Blockstates
blockstate(name_parts, model = None, variants = None, use_default_model = True)
  • name_parts specifies the block resource location, as seen above
  • model specifies the model. If not present, it will default to modid:block/name/parts, meaning blockstate('pink_grass') will create the file modid/blockstates/pink_grass.json, which has a model of modid:block/pink_grass
  • variants specifies the variants as found in the json file. It should be a dictionary as per usual minecraft blockstate files. If it isn't present, it will default to an empty / single variant block: 'variants': { '': model }. If present, each variant that does not specify a model will take the default model, unless use_default_model is false.
blockstate_multipart(name_parts, parts)
  • name_parts specifies the block resource location, as seen above
  • parts specifies the parts. It must be a sequence of part elements. Each part element can be a dictionary (which will be expanded as {'apply': part}), or a pair of a when and apply data, which will be expanded as {'when': part[0], 'apply': part[1]}
Block Models
block_model(name_parts, textures = None, parent = 'block/cube_all', loader = None)
  • name_parts specifies the block resource location, as seen above
  • textures specifies the textures for this specific model. If it is a string, it will create the json: 'textures': { 'texture': textures }. If provided as a dictionary, it will insert 'textures': textures
  • parent specifies the parent model file
  • loader is an optional specification for forge provided custom loaders.
Item Models
item_model(name_parts, textures, parent = 'item/generated', no_textures = False, loader = None)
  • name_parts specifies the item resource location, as seen above
  • textures specifies the textures. If textures are supplied as strings, i.e. 'base_layer', 'middle_layer' ..., it will assign them sequentially to layers, i.e. { 'layer0': 'base_layer', 'layer1': 'middle_layer' ... }. If a dictionary is provided, it will insert those in the same way as the block model
  • parent specifies the parent model file
  • no_textures, if true, will cause the model to have no textures element
  • loader is an optional specification for forge provided custom loaders.
Loot Tables
block_loot(name_parts, loot_pools):
  • name_parts specifies the block resource location, as seen above.
  • loot_pools specifies the contents of the loot table.
  • If loot_pools is passed in as a list or tuple, it will attempt to create a pool for each entry in the tuple.
  • It can also be passed in as a string or dict, in which case it will create one pool from that input.
  • The simplest loot pool is a string, i.e. 'minecraft:dirt', which will create a pool with one entry of type item with the value of 'minecraft:dirt', with one roll, and the default condition ('minecraft:survives_explosion')
  • If a loot pool is a dict, it will look for each possible element of a pool entry, and try to populate them accordingly.
    • entries can be a dict or a string. A string will expand to 'type': 'minecraft:item'
    • conditions can be a list, tuple, dict, or string. A string will expand to {'condition': value}. A dict will be inserted as raw json.
    • functions can be a list, tuple, dict, or string. A string will expand to {'function': value} A dict will be inserted as raw json. rolls will be inserted as raw json. If not present, it will default to 'rolls': 1 children, name, bonus_rolls, weight, and quality will be inserted as raw json if present

In addition, the loot_tables module has several helper methods for common loot table related functions. For example:

  • loot_tables.set_count(min, max, distribution) generates an instance of the minecraft:set_count function.
  • loot_tables.fortune_bonus(multiplier) generates an instance of the minecraft:apply_bonus, with a standard fortune modifier.
Shapeless Crafting Recipes
crafting_shapeless(name_parts, ingredients, result, group = None, conditions = None)
  • name_parts specifies the recipe resource location. Note crafting recipes are automatically added to modid/data/recipes
  • inredients specifies the ingredients. It must be either a list / tuple of item stacks, or a string or dictionary representing an item stack. See above for valid item stack specifications.
  • result specifies the recipe result or output. It must be a single item stack
  • group specifies the group the recipe belongs to
  • conditions specifies any conditions on the recipe being enabled. It must be a list / tuple of valid condition identifiers, or a string or dictionary representing an item stack
Shaped Crafting Recipes
crafting_shaped(name_parts, pattern, ingredients, result, group = None, conditions = None)
  • name_parts specifies the recipe resource location. Note crafting recipes are automatically added to modid/data/recipes
  • pattern specifies the pattern. It must be a list of strings, i.e. ['XXX', ' S ', ' S '] for a pickaxe pattern. The keys must be the same as used in the ingredients field.
  • inredients specifies the ingredients. It can be a dictionary of single character keys to item stacks, or it can be a single item stack (which will default to the first key found, and as such should only be used if there is only one unique input)
  • result specifies the recipe result or output. It must be a single item stack
  • group is as above
  • conditions is as above
Other Recipes or Data
recipe(name_parts, type_in, data_in, group, conditions = None)
data(name_parts, data_in)

This is used to create modded recipes that are loaded via custom deserializers. As such, name_parts needs to include a subdirectory for the recipe type

  • name_parts specifies the recipe resource location.
  • type_in specifies the recipe type
  • data_in specifies the json data to be inserted into the recipe
  • group is as above
  • conditions is as above
Tags
item_tag(name_parts, *values, replace = False)
block_tag(name_parts, *values, replace = False)
fluid_tag(name_parts, *values, replace = False)
entity_tag(name_parts, *values, replace = False)

These are used to create item and block tags respectively

  • name_parts specifies the tag resource location, as seen above
  • values specifies the values. It can be a single string for one value, or a list / tuple of strings for multiple values
  • replace specifies the replace field in the json, i.e. if the tag should replace a previous identical entry

World Generation

New in Minecraft 1.16.2 is the ability to specify all manner of world generation objects. These follow very similar "type-and-config" patterns, and have quite nested structures meaning the data generation for them is a bit different.

In general, builders for the data inside world gen objects can be found in world_gen. These can be nested for any purpose, and the result can be fed to rm.carver, rm.feature, or rm.surface_builder to create configured carvers, configured features, or configured surface builders respectively.

Biomes are possible with rm.biome, which takes a lot of default arguments, and will populate any missing fields to the required ones for a biome. This also does no interpolation, so anything passed in must be specfied as it should appear in the final result json.

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