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A python robotic framework and tools

Project description

:lizard: pyGecko

My robot software.

  • Doesn't use ROS, ROS is a pain to install and maintain on macOS and various linux systems
    • Uses some of the same ideas, constructs, architecture ideas, APIs but not strictly adhering to them
  • Uses Zero MQ as the inter-process communication (uses both TCP and UDS) instead of RPC-XML
    • looked at Google's protobuf, but was more complex than I needed
    • looked at msgpack to serialize data but it was slower for namedtuples
    • right now using pickle to serialize data
    • instead of roscore use geckocore.py as the message hub
      • produces performance data (see below)
    • instead of roslaunch use geckolaunch.py
  • simplejson/pyyaml - config and launch files
  • All of this runs on Raspberry Pi 3
    • Also runs on macOS (UNIX) and Windows

Architecture

  • GeckoCore is a main message hub and calculates statistics for data through put and node cpu/memory usage
    • Actually, when gecko processes start up, they tell geckocore their pid numbers so it can track usage using psutil library
    • Obviously this only works on processes located on the same machine as geckocore
  • Any number of pubs can talk to any number of sub ... it is not a one-to-one relationship.
  • Subscriber can subscribe to multiple topics
  • Publishers are not bound to any one topic, but can also publish to multiple topics

geckocore.py

This is the main message hub and keeps track of messages statistics that pass through it along with connections.

+------------------------------------------------------------
| GeckoCore[32871].............. cpu:   6.7%    mem:   0.06%
| Total messages seen: 1058
+------------------------------
| LISTEN 192.168.86.213:9998 connected to None:None
| LISTEN 192.168.86.213:9999 connected to None:None
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9998 connected to 192.168.86.213:49793
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9998 connected to 192.168.86.213:49792
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9999 connected to 192.168.86.213:49794
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9999 connected to 192.168.86.213:49795
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9999 connected to 192.168.86.213:49796
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9999 connected to 192.168.86.213:49797
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9999 connected to 192.168.86.213:49798
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9999 connected to 192.168.86.213:49799
| ESTABLISHED 192.168.86.213:9998 connected to 192.168.86.213:49800
+------------------------------
 hello.........................   39.3 msgs/s      1.8 kB/s
 hey there.....................   39.3 msgs/s      1.8 kB/s
 cv............................   14.3 msgs/s   4298.6 kB/s

geckocore also is passed the PIDs for processes on the local machine and prints performance data on each process:

+------------------------------
| Alive processes: 9
+------------------------------
| subscribe2[32880]............. cpu:   3.5%    mem:   0.07%
| subscribe2[32882]............. cpu:   3.5%    mem:   0.07%
| subscribe2[32885]............. cpu:   2.2%    mem:   0.08%
| subscribe2[32884]............. cpu:   2.2%    mem:   0.08%
| pcv[32886].................... cpu:   5.7%    mem:   0.18%
| subscribe2[32881]............. cpu:   3.5%    mem:   0.07%
| subscribe2[32883]............. cpu:   3.4%    mem:   0.07%
| publish[32879]................ cpu:   0.9%    mem:   0.07%
| publish[32878]................ cpu:   0.9%    mem:   0.07%

Note that the topics above are: hello, hey there, and cv. They can be any string.

geckolaunch.py

                                geckocore
              spawn | pub --\  +---------+  /---> sub
geckolaunch ------->| pub ---->|in    out|------> sub
                    | pub --/  +---------+  \---> sub
                                             \--> sub

geckolaunch.py allows you to launch a bunch of processes quickly using a launch file. A launch file is just a simple json file where each line takes the form: [file, function, kwargs]. Here is an example:

{
  "processes":
  [
    ["process", "publish", {"topic": "hello"}],
    ["process", "publish", {"topic": "hey there"}],
    ["process", "subscribe2", {"topic": "hello"}],
    ["process", "subscribe2", {"topic": "hello"}],
    ["process", "subscribe2", {"topic": "hey there"}],
    ["process", "subscribe2", {"topic": "hey there"}],
    ["process", "subscribe2", {"topic": "cv"}],
    ["process", "subscribe2", {"topic": "cv"}],
    ["process", "pcv", {"topic": "cv"}]
  ],
  "geckocore": {
      "type": "tcp",
      "in": ["localhost", 9998],
      "out": ["localhost", 9999]
  }
}

OR you can use a hostname as a geckocore key to find it on the network. Here the machine bob.local has a core we want to talk to:

{
  "processes":
  [...],
  "geckocore": {
      "key": "bob"
  }
}

Here we have a bunch of functions (publish, subscribe2, and pcv) located in a python file called process.py (note, the .py file extension is assumed because pygecko uses import to load these functions. There is no reason eveything has to be located in one file, I was just lazy when I wrote this example and did a lot of copy/paste. :smile:

There are a bunch of kwargs (dictionaries) that are passed to the functions full of whatever args you want to pass. In this example, the args are mostly just topic names to pub/sub to.

geckopy

See the examples, but this acts like a rospy and helps make writing pub/sub processes easy. See the /examples folder to see it in action.

  • init_node: this sets up the the process for communications with geckocore
  • logxxx: prints log messages
    from pygecko import geckopy
    geckopy.loginfo('this is a info message')  # just send a string
    geckopy.logwarn('this is a warning message')
    geckopy.logerror('this is a error message')
    geckopy.logdebug('this is a debug message')
    
  • on_shutdown: pushes a function to a stack (FIFO) that will be called when geckopy shutsdown
  • Subscriber: creates a subscriber and appends the callback function to an array in geckopy
  • Publisher: creates a publisher and returns it
  • Rate: given a frequency of how often a loop should run (i.e., 10Hz), the returned object will dynamically set the sleep interval to achieve the rate. Ex:
    from pygecko import geckopy
    rate = geckopy.Rate(20)  # run loop at 20 Hz
    while True:
        rate.sleep()
    

Where is GeckoCore?

geckopy resolves the core address in the following order

  1. kwargs passed to geckopy contains the address. This allows you to over ride talking to a geckocore running on your machine and instead talk to one on another machine. These args can be set in your individual python file or in a launch file.
    kwargs = {
        "geckocore":
            {
                "key": "bob"
            }
    }
    
    # OR
    
    kwargs = {
        "geckocore":{
                "type": "tcp",
                "in": ["bob", 12345],
                "out": ["bob", 23456]
            }
    }
    
  2. if /tmp/gecko*.json exists, then use the address in there. geckocore creates this file.
  3. if all else fails, use the default addresses:
    • type: tcp
    • in: localhost: 9998
    • out: localhost: 9999

Ideally, when programming, you should never have to tell a sub/pub where to connect. geckopy has that info for you because it was set in a launch file, passed to geckopy in args, the data is found in a temp file in the tmp directory, or we fall back to the default values.

Maybe in the future: So I could have core use MDNS telling processes it in/out addresses. Process:

  • geckopy.init_node() sends an MDNS ping out to the local network
  • geckocore hears it and returns its address info
    • could house this in a thread attached to core?

Issues:

  • UDP messages get lost, maybe send 5 pings everytime?
  • not sure about core latency in responding
  • how long should geckopy wait for a response?
  • how do you handle multiple cores on a network?
    • maybe a key identifier or something so only one core responds?
    • how does that get set ... launch file or command line?

So what do you have to know to get geckocore's info?

Method Key IPv4/Zeroconfig Ports Scope Notes
kwargs No Yes Yes Network could get from launch file
MDNS Yes No No Network need key for multiple cores on the network
tempfile No No No Machine fallback solution
default No No No Machine no guarrentee this will work, all else has failed

Change Log

Date Version Notes
2018-Sep-16 1.0.2 dropping python 2.7 support, only 3.7+
2018-Sep-11 1.0.1 working, but still need to flush it out some more
2018-Jul-28 1.0.0 totally nuked everything from orbit and started over
2017-May-14 0.8.3 updates and refactor
2017-Apr-02 0.8.2 fix pypi doc and refactor
2017-Mar-19 0.7.0 refactored
2017-Mar-12 0.6.0 changed messages from dict to classes
2016-Dec-26 0.5.0 refactor
2016-Oct-09 0.4.1 published to PyPi
2010-Mar-10 0.0.1 init

MIT License

Copyright (c) 2010 Kevin J. Walchko

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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