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A library to parse arguments of numbers and number sequences, usable directly or with argparse. Allows concise representation of contiguous or non-contiguous sequences. Example: 1,5-10,40-50/5,200+100/25

Project description

Summary

This library provides two classes for parsing simple integer or floating piont numbers and numeric sequences, optionally enforcing value limits. These can be used as explicit objects or as the type parameter of an argument within an argparse.ArgumentParser.

  • NumberSequence parses an input string and yields a sequence of numbers, optionally ensuring they are within the given limits. It will also convert a sequence of numbers into the string form [as of version 1.2].
  • Number parses an input string and returns a single number; ensuring they are within the given limits.
  • Both classes take a numtype parameter (int or float), and a limits parameter which can be None or a 2-tuple; the 2-tuple imposes limits on the parsed values.

Installation

Install the package using pip, eg:

sudo pip install pynumparser

Or for a specific version:

sudo python3 -m pip install pynumparser

NumberSequence Syntax

Allowed inputs are comprised of one (1) or more subsequences separated by a comma (“,”). Subsequences can be simple numbers or number ranges with or without a stride value.

  • Simple number values yield a single value.

  • A range is expressed as two (2) number values separated by either a dash/hyphen (“-“) or a plus sign (“+”) [as of version 1.3], optionally followed by a slash (“/”) and a stride value.

    • A range will usually yield multiple values including both bounds. This is in contrast to the builtin Python range() behaviour.
      • A lower bound and upper bound may be separated by a single dash/hyphen (“-“). Note that it is legal for the upper bound be negative (eg: “-5–3”).
      • A lower bound and range size may be separated by a single plus sign (“+”). Note that it is legal for the range size be start with a plus sign (eg: “8++5” is equivalent to “8+5”). [As of version 1.3]
    • Only monotonically increasing ranges are allowed:
      • An upper range value must not be less than the lower range value (eg: “5-4” is illegal).
      • The stride must be positive (eg: “5-8/0” and “8-1/-2” are illegal).
      • A range size must not be negative (eg: “8+-4” is illegal) [as of version 1.3].
  • By default numbers are of int type. But if numtype=float is passed to the constructor, the inputs are parsed as floating point numbers with a dot/peroid for a decimial mark. In other words, the representation of 5/4 must be “1.2” and not “1,2” since the comma is used as the subsequence separator.

  • If the difference between the limits is not an even mulitiple of the stride value, then the second range will not be included in the result.

  • The parser has a contains method, which can be used to check if a number is in the range. [as of version 1.1].

  • The Number class has a contains method, which can be check if a number is in the range. [as of version 1.4.1].

  • NumberSequence has a classmethod encode that will convert a sequence into a simplified text representation. [as of version 1.2].

    >>> import pynumparser
    >>> pynumparser.NumberSequence.encode([1, 2, 3, 7, 13, 19, 25])
    '1-3,7-25/6'
    >>> pynumparser.NumberSequence.encode([1.00, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, 2, 2.25])
    '1.0-2.25/0.25'
    >>> pynumparser.NumberSequence.encode(range(10, 100, 5))
    '10-95/5'
    

Exceptions

These apply to both the NumberSequence and Number classes:

  • If the optional constructor limits parameter is provided, then a ValueError will be raised in the constructor if any of the following are violated.
    • The limits parameter must be either None or else a tuple with two (2) values, a lower limit then an upper limit.
    • Both of the limit values may be either None or a valid value of the numtype.
    • If lower limit and upper limit are numbers, then the lower limit must be less than the upper limit.
  • If limits parameter was provided to the constructor, then a ValueError will be raised during parsing if any of the following are violated.
    • If the lower limit is a number, then parsed values must not be less than the lower limit.
    • If the upper limit is a number, then parsed values must not be greater than the upper limit.
  • If any input cannot be parsed as a valid number of given the numtype a ValueError is raised.
  • If any floating point number equates to positive or negative infinity (eg: “1e9999”) a ValueError is raised.

These apply only to the NumberSequence class, during parsing:

  • If the upper bound is less than the lower bound (eg: “8-5”) or [as of version 1.3] if the range size is negative (eg: “8+-3”), then a ValueError is raised.
  • If the stride value is zero or negative, ValueError is raised, even if the upper and lower limit values are equal (eg: “8-8/0”).

If used within an argparse.ArgumentParser, invalid input will raise a ValueError and result in an error message indicating the specific problem, such as:

$ demo.py --fnum 1e20
usage: demo.py [-h] [-i ISEQ] [-f FSEQ] [-I INUM] [-F FNUM]
demo.py: error: argument -F/--fnum: invalid Float (from -100 to 1000), ERROR: "Too High" value: '1e20'

$ demo.py -i 200-100
usage: demo.py [-h] [-i ISEQ] [-f FSEQ] [-I INUM] [-F FNUM]
demo.py: error: argument -i/--iseq: invalid IntSequence (at least -1000), ERROR: "UPPER<LOWER" value: '200-100'

Note that a deficiency in the argparse.ArgumentParser package can cause problems with legal values that start with a dash, even for flags with mandatory arguments. Although not always true, for some values (eg: “-1e5”) the argparser package will incorrectly abort with an error message of “expected on argument”.

To demonstrate (using code from Example section saved as “demo.py”) for a short flag with a valid argument and a long flag with an invalid one:

$ demo.py -f -1e2+2
usage: demo.py [-h] [-i ISEQ] [-f FSEQ] [-I INUM] [-F FNUM]
demo.py: error: argument -f/--fseq: expected one argument

$ demo.py -f-1e2+2
Namespace(fnum=[], fseq=(-100.0, -99.0, -98.0), inum=[], iseq=[])
$ demo.py --fnum -1..5
usage: demo.py [-h] [-i ISEQ] [-f FSEQ] [-I INUM] [-F FNUM]
demo.py: error: argument -F/--fnum: expected one argument

$ demo.py --fnum=-1..5
usage: demo.py [-h] [-i ISEQ] [-f FSEQ] [-I INUM] [-F FNUM]
demo.py: error: argument -F/--fnum: invalid Float (from -100 to 1000), ERROR: "Parse Error" value: '-1..5'

Example with argparse.ArgumentParser

import argparse
import pynumparser

# Note:  Typical values would likely include 'help' and  'default' parameters.
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description="Number printer")

# Add a simple int parameter, requiring it be between -40 and 130, inclusive:
parser.add_argument('-a', '--age', type=pynumparser.Number(limits=(-40, 130)))

# Add int sequence, requiring values to be non-negative:
parser.add_argument('-i', '--ints', type=pynumparser.NumberSequence(limits=(0, None)))

# Add a simple float parameter, requiring it be a positive value less than 1000:
parser.add_argument('-s', '--seconds', type=pynumparser.Number(numtype=float, limits=(1e-230, 1000)))

# Add a float sequence, requiring the numbers be between 0 and 365.25 inclusive:
parser.add_argument('-d', '--days', type=pynumparser.NumberSequence(numtype=float, limits=(0, 365.25)))

print(parser.parse_args())

Examples NumberSequence Results

With the default parameters (numtype=int, limits=None):

  • “5” yields a result of (5).
  • “5-8” is equivalent to “5-8/1” and both yield a result of (5, 6, 7, 8).
  • “3-9/3” would give a result of (3, 6, 9).
  • “-3-2” would yield a result of (-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2).
  • “-3–2” would yield a result of (-3, -2).
  • “-5-5/5” would yield a result of (-5, 0, 5).
  • “-8,-9-9/6,12-30/12,5,2,3” would yield (-8, -9, -3, 3, 9, 12, 24, 5, 2, 3).

With parameters (numtype=float, limits=None) the results are floating point numbers:

  • “5.125” yields a result of (5.125).
  • “5,125” yields a result of (5.0, 125.0) since the comma is a subsequence separator.
  • “5-7” is equivalent to “5-7/1” and both yield a result of (5.0, 6.0, 7.0).
  • “0-1/.25” would give a result of (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0).

Releases

Version Description
1.0.1 Initial release
1.1 Added the NumberSequence.contains() method.
1.2 Added the NumberSequence.encode() method, fixed documentation on PyPi.
1.3 Added the NumberSequence format “+” to specify a range size.
1.4 Added the Number.contains() method and Travis CI test integration.
1.4.1 Moved project to host at Gitlab.

Build Status

Build Status

Known Issues

  • Under some circumstances, floating point representation errors cause the upper range to be (unexpectedly) omitted. This happens due to the internal representation of floating point numbers, and is not limited to this package, or even to Python. For more information, see: Floating Point Arithmetic: Issues and Limitations.

    • In the first example (“0-13/1.3”), the value of 13 is not included since the previous value was larger than 11.7.
    • In the second example (“1.2-2.0/0.2”) the final value is slightly less than 2.0 due to representation error.
    >>> import pynumparser
    >>> parser = pynumparser.NumberSequence(float)
    >>> parser.parse("0-13/1.3")
    (0.0, 1.3, 2.6, 3.9000000000000004, 5.2, 6.5, 7.8, 9.1, 10.4, 11.700000000000001)
    >>> parser.parse("1.2-2.0/0.2")
    (1.2, 1.4, 1.5999999999999999, 1.7999999999999998, 1.9999999999999998)
    

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