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YAML Templating Language

Project description

License: MIT Tests Codecov PyPI

Summary

YATL is a templating language in which both the input and output are YAML. This solves the common problem of wanting to have a template that produces YAML files, but are usually solved by using an templating framework (Go templates, Jinja2, etc.), thus making the input not YAML. This means you can no longer lint your input, or load it in an IDE without confusing it. It also means that your template is probably tied to the specific language in which your toolchain is written.

YATL aims to be both a standard YAML-in, YAML-out templating language, and a library to load files. This codebase is a Python implementation, but the plan is to make a core library with bindings for many languages.

This is a work in progress. See the status section below for details.

Installation

$ pip install PyYATL

Usage

>>> import yatl
>>> yatl.load("""
... hosts:
...     - .for (host in west_hosts):
...         .(host)
...     - .for (host in east_hosts):
...         .(host)
... """, {"west_hosts": ["west-1", "west-2"], "east_hosts": ["east-1", "east-2"]})
{'hosts': ['west-1', 'west-2', 'east-1', 'east-2']}

The YATL Language

This section gives an overview of the YATL syntax. For more details, see the complete documentation (coming soon).

All YATL directives start with a ..

Interpolation

When .(p) is seen in a value, it is replaced with the parameter value of p.

Example:

environment: .(env)
deployment_name: .(service_name)-.(env)

If env = production and service_name = foo, then the output would be:

environment: production
deployment_name: foo-production

Conditionals

Example:

deployment_type: canary
.if (is_production):
    alert-email: page_me@example.com

If is_production = true, then the output is:

deployment_type: canary
alert-email: page_me@example.com

You can also have .elif and .else:

.if (is_production):
    slack-channel: "#production"
.elif (is_staging):
    slack-channel: "#staging"
.else:
    slack-channel: "#development"

You can also use .if in lists. This is a special case where the value within the .if will extend the outer list:

hosts:
    - west-1
    - west-2
    - .if (multi_data_center):
        - east-1
        - east-2

Assuming multi_data_center = true, this would output:

hosts:
    - west-1
    - west-2
    - east-1
    - east-2

If you actually want a list within a list when using .if, you need to add an extra list wrapping the .if.

For Loops

For loops allow you to loop over values:

hosts:
    .for (host in hosts):
        .(host)

If hosts = ["west-1", "west-2"], then the output would be:

hosts:
    - west-1
    - west-2

For loops always return lists, so the syntax is a bit loose. The following are both equivalent:

hosts:
    .for (host in hosts):
        .(host)
hosts:
    - .for (host in hosts):
        .(host)

Like .if, they extend the outer list, so you can combine for loops into a single list:

hosts:
    - .for (host in west_hosts):
        .(host)
    - .for (host in east_hosts):
        .(host)

Assuming the obvious assignments, this outputs:

hosts:
    - west-1
    - west-2
    - east-1
    - east-2

Loading Files

YATL allows including files, to make it easier to organize otherwise large YAML files.

The basic idea is that if you load a YATL file like this:

foo: bar
.load: some-file.yaml

And if some-file.yaml looks like this:

baz: quux

Then you'll get this:

foo: bar
baz: quux

If you want to load more than one file in the same object, you can also load lists of files:

.load:
  - defs.yaml
  - resource_types.yaml
  - resources.yaml

Loaded files can also load other files recursively.

If files contain the same fields as the object they're loaded into, then whatever field is seen last will be the one used in the output. There is no deep merging of nested objects done with .load. You can however load deeply nested objects and merge specific nested fields with .load_defaults_from.

Files loaded with .load_defaults_from are always considered defaults. Hence, if a file has fields in common with loaded defaults, then the file doing the loading always wins out. Otherwise objects are merged. For example, say we have this in a file called config.yaml:

outer:
    .load_defaults_from: some-file.yaml
    inner:
        foo: bar

If some-file.yaml looks like this:

inner:
    foo: baz

Then the result will be this (fields in both config.yaml and some-file.yaml are taken from config.yaml, because loads are always defaults):

outer:
    inner:
        foo: bar

If some-file.yaml looks like this instead:

inner:
    baz: quux

Then the result would be this (fields in objects are merged):

outer:
    inner:
        foo: bar
        baz: quux

If inner was not an object (e.g., it's a list) in either file, then no merging will happen, and whatever is in config.yaml will be the result.

Lastly, if a file loads two or more files which both have defaults for the same field, then whichever is loaded at the highest nesting level will win. For example, if we have:

outer:
    .load_defaults_from: file1.yaml
    inner:
        load_defaults_from: file2.yaml

If both file1.yaml and file2.yaml have defaults for the same field (which would have to be inside inner), then the defaults from file2.yaml will take precendence.

Definitions

Definitions in YATL are an improvement over anchors in YAML. They're a bit like a function:

.def email_on_failure(email):
    .if (is_production):
        on-failure:
            alert-email: .(email)
tasks:
    - test:
        command: run_tests.sh
        .use email_on_failure: tests@example.com
    - deploy:
        command: do_deploy.sh
        .use email_on_failure: deploys@example.com

If is_production = true, then the output will be:

tasks:
    - test:
        command: run_tests.sh
        on-failure:
            alert-email: tests@example.com
    - deploy:
        command: do_deploy.sh
        on-failure:
            alert-email: deploys@example.com

If is_production = false then the on-failure parts will be left out.

Definitions are more powerful than anchors because you can parameterize them. They're also cleaner because, unlike anchors, the definition doesn't remain in the output. Only the usages are in the output.

Definitions can have zero to any number of arguments. If they have zero arguments, then pass an empty string, list, or object as the argument when using it (this is just so the syntax is valid YAML):

.def replicas:
    .if (is_production): 3
    .else: 1

services:
    .for (s in services):
        name: .(s)
        replicas:
            .use replicas: {}

If is_production = true and services = ["foo", "bar"], then the output will be:

services:
    - name: foo
      replicas: 3
    - name: bar
      replicas: 3

If there are multiple arguments, they can be passed as an object or list:

.def task(name, command):
    name: .(name)
    command: .(command)
    container: ubuntu
    .if (is_production):
        on-failure:
            alert-email: errors@example.com

tasks:
    - .use task:  # Pass args as an object
        name: build
        command: build.sh
    - .use task:  # Pass args as a list
        - test
        - test.sh
    - .use task: [deploy, deploy.sh]  # Shorthand list

If is_production = false, the output will be:

tasks:
    - name: build
      command: build.sh
      container: ubuntu
    - name: test
      command: test.sh
      container: ubuntu
    - name: deploy
      command: deploy.sh
      container: ubuntu

Status

⚠️ The language spec is likely to change at least slightly.

  • Proof of concept
  • Support safe expressions
  • Polish (allow escaping, etc.)
  • Complete documentation
  • Include line number with error messages and don't stop at the first error
  • Support Python versions other than CPython 3.6 and Python 3.7+ (because of dict ordering)
  • Support other programming languages

This software should be considered beta.

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