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A place to store your useful one liners

Project description

Rucksack Logo

A place to store your useful one-liners

Overview

Rucksack is an interactive command runner that provides useful auto-completion capabilities for those hard to remember one-liners that we all have. It provides a way for you to run your one-liners againt remote systems, complete with any needed arguments (templated out via Jinja2), without having to remember them.

It was inspired by that useful_stuff.txt file that every SysAdmin has on their desktop. You know the one: you come up with a clever one-liner, and you throw it in there so that you can reuse it someday.

Rucksack allows you to store your one-liners (and their potential arguments) in a YAML file. You can then connect to a remote host (or localhost) and run those one-liners from one easy place. No more copying and pasting from a useful_stuff.txt file!

Want to learn more? Head on over to the tutorial for more examples and to get started!

Rucksack Demo

Warning: Rucksack is a very new project and is under heavy development. Things may change. I think I've got the config file syntax nailed down, but this is still an early project. Please file an issue if you come across a bug.

Installing

Rucksack is available on PyPi and can be installed via pip:

pip install --user rucksack

The installation will add the ruck command to your path.

Usage

Rucksack has a help page. Simply run ruck -h to see all options.

In general, you simply need to specify --host ${hostname} so that Rucksack can connect to a remote host. If you specify localhost or 127.0.0.1, Rucksack will not attempt to connect via SSH and will simply shell out local commands.

Once you launch Rucksack, you will be taken to a prompt. From there, you can run any commands you have defined in your configuration. To quit, simply enter the quit command.

Configuring

Rucksack uses a simple YAML configuration file (or multiple YAML files) for its configuration. The easiest way to become acquainted with the configuration file is to try out the tutorial.

Config File Location

Rucksack is configured via one or more YAML files. You can specify a configuration file or directory at the command line, or you can let Rucksack search for one in the following order

  • A rucksack.yml or rucksack.yaml in the local directory
  • Any .yml or .yaml files in your home directory at ~/.config/ (e.g., /home/tony/.config/rucksack/config.yml)
  • Any .yml or .yaml files in /etc/rucksack/ (e.g., /etc/rucksack/config.yml)
  • An /etc/rucksack.yml or /etc/rucksack.yaml file

Rucksack will process the above list in order and will stop once it has loaded one or more config files from those locations.

Config File Syntax

The best way to get up and running with Rucksack configuration is to follow the tutorial. If you're interested in the logistics of a Rucksack config, then feel free to read on. However, reading the tutorial is strongly encouraged, as it will take you through concrete examples.

For the purposes of Semantic Versioning, the config file format is the "public API."

The basic unit of configuration in Rucksack is a YAML dictionary with a command key:

get-uptime:
  command: uptime

These dictionaries can be nested, which aids in creating more sensible auto-completions:

system:
  basic-info:
    get-uptime:
      command: uptime

A command can have 0 or more args (arguments), and those arguments can optionally be mandatory. Arguments are rendered using Jinja templates.

tail-log:
  command: "tail {{ log_file }}"
  args:
    - log_file:
        mandatory: True

An argument can specify values to the user, and can even have a default value:

tail-log:
  command: "tail {{ log_file }}"
  args:
    - log_file:
        mandatory: True
        default: /var/log/syslog
        values:
          - /var/log/syslog
          - /var/log/kern.log
          - /var/log/auth.log

Sometimes, you only want to render an argument if the user specifies a value. For example: you don't want to render a command-line flag if the user didn't provide any value for it. This can be done with an arg_string key for the argument. In the example below, the num_lines argument only appends -n {{ num_lines }} to the command if the user specifies a value for num_lines.

  tail-log:
    command: "tail {{ log_file }}"
    args:
      - num_lines:
         arg_string: -n {{ num_lines }}
      - log_file:
          mandatory: True
          default: /var/log/syslog
          values:
            - /var/log/syslog
            - /var/log/kern.log
            - /var/log/auth.log

Finally, argument values can be dynamically interpolated as the result of other commands. The example below provides a list of log_files for the user to choose from by executing a find command in /var/log/nginx. Be aware that command output is cached, so this might not be appropriate for values that change often.

nginx:
  get-top-5-ips:
    command: "sudo cat {{ log_file }} 2>/dev/null | cut -f 1 -d ' ' | sort | uniq -c | sort -hr | head -n 5"
    args:
      - log_file:
          mandatory: True
          from_command: "sudo find /var/log/nginx -name '*access.log*' | grep -v '.gz'"

Caveats and Known Issues

There are currently a few caveats to using Rucksack (please file an issue if you find more):

  • Password entry via a sudo prompt isn't really supported. It will work, but it won't be pretty. It's expected that the remote user has permissions to execute any commands used by Rucksack (or that they can use passwordless sudo).
  • The from_command directive is naive, and it will ignore any errors. For example: imagine that the find command in the above config is broken. Rucksack will simply ignore this and won't present any values to the user for the auto-completion
  • Config file validation isn't currently implemented, so you may get unexpected results (such as exceptions thrown when exiting) if your config file is broken.
  • Config file parsing, auto-completion, and command rendering almost certainly are not as efficient as they could be (lots of looping over dictionary keys or arrays). Optimizations will come with time.
  • Tests and test logic could use a lot of cleanup and rework

Credits

Thanks to my very talented wife, Megan Critelli, who designed the Rucksack logo. She does commissions and sells prints.

Rucksack stands on the shoulders of some giant projects that made it easy to construct. Special thanks to the following projects for such great Python tools. If you enjoy Rucksack, please consider supporting these projects.

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