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Graph-based provisioning framework.

Project description

Tests Passing Build Passing Documentation Status Latest PyPI version PyPI License

Introduction

Statey is an infrastructure-as-code framework written in Python. The API is designed to be as expressive and Pythonic as possible, and the simplicity of the design makes it just as easy to embed in a Python application as it is to use the command line interface like any infra-as-code application.

Statey supports pulumi resource providers through pylumi, which actually in turn supports Terraform resource providers. This means an entire package index of potential resources is available*.

_NOTE_: Terraform resource providers communicate their type information via JSONSchema, which supports higher-level type operations such as oneOf. At the moment statey does not support anything except basic JSONSchema types (objects, strings, numbers, arrays, booleans, etc.)

The core engine is lightweight and has just a few pure-python dependencies, and it is built from the ground up for extensibility. One of the core data strucrues in statey is the Registry, which is built on top of the excellent plugin engine pluggy. Nearly all of the core functions of statey are hook-based and can be extended or overridden very easily.

Installation

statey and all of its core extension modules can be installed using the following terminal command:

$ pip install statey[all]

_NOTE_: If you are using Zshell you will have to put statey[all] in quotes i.e. "statey[all]".

For most users, installing statey[all] will be the proper entry point.

For more details about optional dependencies and available extras please see INSTALL.rst for details.

Usage Example

NOTE: to run this example you must have the pulumi aws provider installed. This can be done by running the following if it is not already installed:

$ statey install pulumi/aws==2.13.1

A typical statey module might look something like the following (in a file called statey_module.py):

import statey as st
from statey.ext.pulumi.providers import aws

@st.declarative
def module(session):
    bucket = aws.s3.Bucket(
        bucket='my-bucket-name'
    )
    object_1 = aws.s3.BucketObject(
        bucket=bucket.bucket,
        key='file-1.json',
        source='./static/file1.json',
        contentType='application/json'
    )
    object_2 = aws.s3.BucketObject(
        bucket=bucket.bucket,
        key='file-2.txt',
        content=st.f('This is in a bucket named {bucket.bucket}')
    )

Next, simply run the following in the same directory as your statey_module.py file:

$ export AWS_DEFAULT_REGION=<my_default_region>
$ statey up

The export AWS_DEFAULT_REGION command is essential because setting the region is required for the Pulumi AWS provider. As an alternative and more general solution to statey configuration one could create a statey_conf.py file in the same directory with the following content:

import statey as st

st.helpers.set_provider_defaults("pulumi/aws", {"region": "<my_default_region>"})

The conf file will always be run before the statey_module.py module is loaded, and it is intended to register hooks to change statey’s behavior.

After running statey up, the application will display a confirmation message, and if confirmed will subsequently execute the operations displayed in the plan. At this point the statey application is fully aware of and managing the infrastructure defined in statey_module.py. You can edit, remove, add to or delete this infrastructure fluently and incrementally without interrupting your existing resources. For example, perhaps we want to change the naming scheme for our s3 objects:

import statey as st
from statey.ext.pulumi.providers import aws

@st.declarative
def module(session):
    bucket = aws.s3.Bucket(
        bucket='my-bucket-name'
    )
    object_1 = aws.s3.BucketObject(
        bucket=bucket.bucket,
        key='statey-test-file-1.json',
        source='./static/file1.json',
        contentType='application/json'
    )
    object_2 = aws.s3.BucketObject(
        bucket=bucket.bucket,
        key='statey-test-file-2.txt',
        content=st.f('This is in a bucket named {bucket.bucket}')
    )

You should get an output something like the following:

* object_2:current:task:delete
| * object_1:current:task:delete
* | object_2:config:task:create
 /
* object_1:config:task:create

Since you are changing the key of each object, statey detects that each one needs to be deleted and recreated, and understands the order those things need to be done in. The same goes for any update you make to your configuration, or tearing down all of your infrastructure altogether.

Compatibility

Tests are passing on Mac OS X and Ubuntu with Python 3.7 and 3.8. See recent test runs in Actions for details. There are known incompatabilities with Python 3.6 at the moment.

Contact

If you have issues using this repository please open a issue or reach out to me at cameron.l.feenstra@gmail.com.

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