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Automatic app configuration of app objects.

Project description

tree-config

Configuration of objects that are nested in a tree-like fashion.

For more information: https://matham.github.io/tree-config/index.html

Supported Python versions Latest Version on PyPI Coverage status Github action status

Installation

tree-config can be installed with:

pip install tree-config

Configuration usage

tree-config can dump all the configurable properties of all your classes to a yaml file and then load the the file and restore/apply the values to the properties. E.g.:

class App:

    _config_props_ = ('name', )

    _config_children_ = {'app panel': 'panel'}

    def __init__(self):
        self.name = 'Desk'
        self.panel = AppPanel()

class AppPanel:

    _config_props_ = ('color', )

    color = 'A4FF67'

will automatically configure name and color.

Following is a guide by example of the multiples ways to control the configuration. See the configuration API, including the Configuration class for complete details.

See the examples directory in the repo for complete runnable code of the following examples.

Basic properties

This example has an app class that contains two panels that are configurable. _config_props_ lists the configurable properties for the class, while _config_children_ constructs the tree of objects that are configurable.

class App:

    _config_props_ = ('size', 'name')

    _config_children_ = {'app panel': 'panel1', 'home panel': 'panel2'}

    def __init__(self):
        self.size = 12
        self.name = 'Desk'

        self.panel1 = AppPanel()
        self.panel2 = HomePanel()


class AppPanel:

    _config_props_ = ('color', )

    color = 'A4FF67'


class HomePanel:

    _config_props_ = ('shape', )

    shape = 'circle'

Then, running:

from tree_config import dump_config, read_config_from_object
app = App()
dump_config('basic_example.yaml', read_config_from_object(app))
print(f'Shape is: {app.panel2.shape}')

creates a basic_example.yaml file with the following contents:

app panel: {color: A4FF67}
home panel: {shape: circle}
name: Desk
size: 12

and it prints Shape is: circle. If we want to load a previous yaml file, where say the shape was "square" and apply it to the instance, we do:

from tree_config import load_config, apply_config
app = App()
apply_config(app, load_config(app, 'basic_example.yaml'))
print(f'Shape is: {app.panel2.shape}')

This in turn prints Shape is: square.

Hooking property discovery

_config_props_ and _config_children_ are defined on a class, not on instances. When tree-config uses them, it will walk the whole class hierarchy and accumulate their values from all super classes because a sub-class does not overwrite them, but rather adds to them.

If _config_props and/or _config_children is defined on a class or instance, tree-config will use that value directly, instead of walking _config_props_ and/or _config_children_, respectively.

E.g. the following code:

from tree_config import dump_config, read_config_from_object


class App:

    _config_children_ = {'app panel': 'panel1', 'home panel': 'panel2'}

    def __init__(self):
        self.panel1 = AppPanel()
        self.panel2 = HomePanel()


class RootPanel:

    _config_props_ = ('size', 'name')

    size = 12

    name = 'Desk'


class AppPanel(RootPanel):

    _config_props_ = ('color', )

    color = 'A4FF67'


class HomePanel(AppPanel):

    _config_props_ = ('shape', )

    shape = 'circle'

    group = 'window'

    _config_props = ('group', 'size')

when run with:

app = App()
# now get and save config to yaml file
dump_config('hook_properties.yaml', read_config_from_object(app))

will generate this yaml file:

app panel:
  color: A4FF67
  name: Desk
  size: 12
home panel:
  group: window
  size: 12

Notice how app panel contains the properties of both RootPanel and AppPanel, while home panel only has the properties listed in _config_props. _config_children behaves similarly.

Custom values hooks

We may wish to hook the property getting/setting process to change the value before it is saved or before it is applied again.

E.g. consider that we have a property that stores a namedtuple that we need to dump as a list (because yaml doesn’t understand named tuple) and create a named tuple again when restoring. get_config_property and apply_config_property are the needed hook methods, that are automatically used if present in the class:

from collections import namedtuple
from tree_config import dump_config, load_config, apply_config, \
    read_config_from_object

Point = namedtuple('Point', ['x', 'y'])


class App:

    _config_props_ = ('point', 'name')

    point = Point(11, 34)

    name = ''

    def get_config_property(self, name):
        if name == 'point':
            return tuple(self.point)
        return getattr(self, name)

    def apply_config_property(self, name, value):
        if name == 'point':
            self.point = Point(*value)
        else:
            setattr(self, name, value)

Then, running:

from tree_config import dump_config, read_config_from_object
app = App()
dump_config('custom_value_example.yaml', read_config_from_object(app))
print(f'point is: {app.point}')

creates a custom_value_example.yaml file with the following contents:

name: ''
point: [11, 34]

and it prints point is: Point(x=11, y=34). If we want to load and apply the yaml file again, we do:

from tree_config import load_config, apply_config
app = App()
apply_config(app, load_config(app, 'custom_value_example.yaml'))
print(f'point is: {app.point}')

This in turn prints again point is: Point(x=11, y=34).

See also apply_config_child for similarly hooking into applying the children objects. The default, when not provided is to use apply_config, so if overriding, that should probably also be used for the base case.

Custom tags (pickling)

Yaml offers support for representing arbitrary objects using custom tags in the file. This enables global support for the objects, without having to use get_config_property / apply_config_property wherever they are used.

Using the point example above:

from collections import namedtuple
from tree_config import dump_config, load_config, apply_config, \
    read_config_from_object
from ruamel.yaml import BaseConstructor, BaseRepresenter

Point = namedtuple('Point', ['x', 'y'])

yaml_tag = '!tree_config_example_point'

# encoder
def _represent_point(representer: BaseRepresenter, val):
    return representer.represent_sequence(yaml_tag, tuple(val))

# decoder
def _construct_point(constructor: BaseConstructor, tag, node):
    return Point(*constructor.construct_sequence(node))

# tell yaml how to represent a Point
def register_point_yaml_support() -> None:
    BaseRepresenter.add_multi_representer(Point, _represent_point)
    BaseConstructor.add_multi_constructor(yaml_tag, _construct_point)


class App:

    _config_props_ = ('point', 'name')

    point = Point(11, 34)

    name = ''

Now, call:

register_point_yaml_support()

before running the tree-config dumping/loading code from the last section and it will generate a yaml file with contents:

name: ''
point: !tree_config_example_point [11, 34]

See also yaml_dumps and yaml_loads for additional customization. Most functions take a yaml_dump_str / yaml_load_str to allow further customizing the yaml objects. See also register_torch_yaml_support in tree_config.yaml for a more complete example as well as some built-in optional representers that can be registered directly.

Post-applying dispatch

After applying configuration to a object and its children objects, tree-config will call the post_config_applied method of the object, if the method exists. E.g.:

from tree_config import dump_config, load_config, apply_config, \
    read_config_from_object


class App:

    _config_props_ = ('size', 'name')

    _config_children_ = {'app panel': 'panel'}

    size = 12

    name = 'Desk'

    def __init__(self):
        self.panel = Panel()

    def apply_config_property(self, name, value):
        print('applying', name)
        setattr(self, name, value)

    def post_config_applied(self):
        print('done applying app')


class Panel:

    _config_props_ = ('color', )

    color = 'A4FF67'

    def apply_config_property(self, name, value):
        print('applying', name)
        setattr(self, name, value)

    def post_config_applied(self):
        print('done applying panel')

Then, saving and again applying the yaml using:

# create app and set properties
app = App()

# now get and save config to yaml file
dump_config('post_apply_dispatch.yaml', read_config_from_object(app))
# load config and apply it
apply_config(app, load_config(app, 'post_apply_dispatch.yaml'))

prints the following:

applying color
done applying panel
applying name
applying size
done applying app

Configurable class

The above examples used a duck typing approach to these special configuration/hook methods, and any/all of these methods were optional. tree-config also offers a Configurable superclass that defines all these methods with appropriate default values.

There’s no benefit to inheriting from Configurable, but it does provide a baseclass listing all the special configuration methods. Additionally, it does cache the list of properties/config children for each class, so once looked up, it does not need to walk the tree, unlike the duck typing approach that re-computes at every save/apply.

Auto docs

In addition to configuration, tree-config can also hook into the sphinx doc generating build steps and generate docs listing all the properties that can be configured by the application and show the doc string for each of them. This is helpful to users who want to configure these properties using the configuration yaml file.

The example directory has a complete doc example.

Given a root object (e.g. App in the examples), we can add callbacks in conf.py that is called by sphinx as it encounters properties listed in _config_props_. The callback then saves the doc strings of these properties into a yaml file.

Subsequently, when the build is done, tree-config can go through all the configurable properties and starting from the root object or class, extract the doc strings from the yaml file, and create a rst file of those docstrings.

E.g. starting with this code in :

class App:
    """The app."""

    _config_props_ = ('size', 'name')

    _config_children_ = {'app panel': 'panel1', 'home panel': 'panel2'}

    size = 55
    """Some filename."""

    name = ''
    """Some name."""

    panel1: 'AppPanel' = None
    """The app panel."""

    panel2: 'HomePanel' = None
    """The home panel."""

    def __init__(self, size, name, color, shape):
        self.size = size
        self.name = name

        self.panel1 = AppPanel()
        self.panel1.color = color
        self.panel2 = HomePanel()
        self.panel2.shape = shape


class AppPanel:
    """The app panel."""

    _config_props_ = ('color', )

    color = ''
    """Color of the app."""


class HomePanel:
    """The home panel."""

    _config_props_ = ('shape', )

    shape = ''
    """Shape of the home."""

then, we add the following to the top of the conf.py file:

import os
import sys
from functools import partial
sys.path.insert(0, os.path.abspath('../'))
from config_example import App
from tree_config.doc_gen import create_doc_listener, write_config_props_rst

the exact path added to sys.path depends on where the code is, or if it’s a python package that is not needed because it’s already installed.

We also need to add 'sphinx.ext.autodoc' to the list of extensions. Finally, at the end of conf.py add:

def setup(app):
    # dump all config_example package/subpackages config docstrings to config_prop_docs.yaml
    create_doc_listener(app, 'config_example', 'config_prop_docs.yaml')

    # then get docstrings from yaml file, walk all config properties from App and
    # dump formatted config docs to source/config.rst
    app.connect(
        'build-finished', partial(
            write_config_props_rst, App, 'config_example',
            filename='config_prop_docs.yaml', rst_filename='source/config.rst')
    )

Finally, to the sphinx generated index.rst we added config.rst (the filename of the file that will be automatically created under source). We also need to add somewhere in the index or files it references the auto-doc references for all the classes, otherwise we won’t get the relevant docstrings. We added it as:

.. toctree::
   :maxdepth: 2
   :caption: Contents:

   config.rst


API
===

.. automodule:: config_example
   :members:

in index.rst.

Finally, we run:

echo $'Config\n===========' > source/config.rst
make html
make html

First we created a mostly empty config.rst file. Otherwise sphinx doesn’t include it when it is generated. Next we ran make html twice, the first time it automatically generates the following config_prop_docs.yaml file:

config_example.App:
  name:
  - Some name.
  - ''
  size:
  - Some filename.
  - ''
config_example.AppPanel:
  color:
  - Color of the app.
  - ''
config_example.HomePanel:
  shape:
  - Shape of the home.
  - ''

The second make html extracts the docstrings from this yaml file and uses that create config.rst with the following contents:

CONFIG_EXAMPLE Config
=====================

The following are the configuration options provided by the app. It can be configured by changing appropriate values in the ``config.yaml`` settings file. The options default to the default value of the classes for each of the options.

`name`:
 Default value::

  ''

 Some name.

`size`:
 Default value::

  55

 Some filename.


home panel
----------

`shape`:
 Default value::

  ''

 Shape of the home.


app panel
---------

`color`:
 Default value::

  ''

 Color of the app.

This rst is automatically rendered by sphinx to nice html with the rest of the docs and it looks something like:


CONFIG_EXAMPLE Config

The following are the configuration options provided by the app. It can be configured by changing appropriate values in the config.yaml settings file. The options default to the default value of the classes for each of the options.

name:

Default value:

''

Some name.

size:

Default value:

55

Some filename.

home panel

shape:

Default value:

''

Shape of the home.

app panel

color:

Default value:

''

Color of the app.


Class vs instance

The configuration examples above save the config from the App instance. One can also use the App class to dump the yaml. The major difference is that the apply_config_child, get_config_property, apply_config_property, and post_config_applied methods, which are instance methods, are skipped and not used.

Also, unlike for instances, where it would fail if _config_children_ lists a child property whose value is None, for the class it will fallback on the type hint of the property, if one is defined.

Using the App class, rather than a App() instance is helpful during doc building when it may not be possible to instantiate the full App (see the docs example above that uses the class instance with type hints).

Reusing other project docs

Because we rely on autodoc to generate config_prop_docs.yaml, tree-config provides a mechanism to reuse the docstrings from other projects we depend on.

E.g. imagine we depend on remote1 and remote2 projects who defines classes that is configurable and our projects inherits and extends them with further configurable properties. Also assume these remote projects dumped their configurable docstrings to config_prop_docs.yaml like in the example and made it available in the root of their sphinx generated docs e.g. on github-pages.

Then, tree-config provides tools to merge those docstrings into ours to be able to create config.rst from them as follows:

echo $'Config\n===========' > source/config.rst
python -m tree_config.doc_gen download \
    -u "https://user.github.io/remote1/config_prop_docs.yaml" -o config_prop_docs.yaml
python -m tree_config.doc_gen download -f config_prop_docs.yaml \
    -u "https://matham.github.io/remote2/config_prop_docs.yaml" -o config_prop_docs.yaml
make html
make html

This downloads and merges the yaml files from our dependencies, adds to it our own docs, and generates the config.rst.

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