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A library for constructing a Verilog HDL source code in Python

Project Description

Veriloggen

A library for constructing a Verilog HDL source code in Python

Copyright (C) 2015, Shinya Takamaeda-Yamazaki

E-mail: takamaeda_at_ist.hokudai.ac.jp

License

Apache License 2.0 (http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0)

Publication

If you use Veriloggen in your research, please cite my paper about Pyverilog. (Veriloggen is constructed on Pyverilog.)

  • Shinya Takamaeda-Yamazaki: Pyverilog: A Python-based Hardware Design Processing Toolkit for Verilog HDL, 11th International Symposium on Applied Reconfigurable Computing (ARC 2015) (Poster), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol.9040/2015, pp.451-460, April 2015. Paper
@inproceedings{Takamaeda:2015:ARC:Pyverilog,
title={Pyverilog: A Python-Based Hardware Design Processing Toolkit for Verilog HDL},
author={Takamaeda-Yamazaki, Shinya},
booktitle={Applied Reconfigurable Computing},
month={Apr},
year={2015},
pages={451-460},
volume={9040},
series={Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
publisher={Springer International Publishing},
doi={10.1007/978-3-319-16214-0_42},
url={http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16214-0_42},
}

What’s Veriloggen?

Veriloggen is an open-sourced library for constructing a Verilog HDL source code in Python.

Veriloggen is not a behavior synthesis (or high level synthesis). Veriloggen provides a lightweight abstraction of Verilog HDL AST. You can build up a hardware design written in Verilog HDL very easily by using the AST abstraction and the entire functionality of Python.

Veriloggen is not designed for designing a hardware by programmer directly, but is for providing an efficient abstraction to develop a more efficient domain specific language and tools.

Installation

Requirements

  • Python: 2.7, 3.5 or later

Python3 is recommended.

  • Icarus Verilog: 0.9.7 or later (but 10.0 is not recommended)

Install on your platform. For exmple, on Ubuntu:

sudo apt-get install iverilog
  • Jinja2: 2.8 or later

Install on your python environment by using pip:

pip install jinja2
  • Pyverilog: 1.1.1 or later

Install from pip (or download and install from GitHub):

pip install pyverilog
  • IPgen: 0.3.1 or later

Install from pip (or download and install from GitHub):

pip install ipgen

Options

  • pytest: 2.8.2 or later
  • pytest-pythonpath: 0.7 or later

These softwares are required for running the tests in tests and examples:

pip install pytest pytest-pythonpath
  • Graphviz: 2.38.0 or later
  • Pygraphviz: 1.3.1 or later

These softwares are required for graph visualization by veriloggen.dataflow:

sudo apt-get install graphviz
pip install pygraphviz

Install

Install Veriloggen:

python setup.py install

On Docker

Dockerfile is available, so that you can try Veriloggen on Docker without any installation on your host platform.

cd docker
sudo docker build -t user/veriloggen .
sudo docker run --name veriloggen -i -t user/veriloggen /bin/bash
cd veriloggen/examples/led/
make

Getting Started

You can find some examples in ‘veriloggen/examples/’ and ‘veriloggen/tests’.

Let’s begin veriloggen by an example. Create a example Python script in Python as below. A blinking LED hardware is modeled in Python. Open ‘hello_led.py’ in the root directory.

from __future__ import absolute_import
from __future__ import print_function
import sys
import os
from veriloggen import *


def mkLed():
    m = Module('blinkled')
    width = m.Parameter('WIDTH', 8)
    clk = m.Input('CLK')
    rst = m.Input('RST')
    led = m.OutputReg('LED', width, initval=0)
    count = m.Reg('count', 32, initval=0)

    seq = Seq(m, 'seq', clk, rst)

    seq.If(count == 1024 - 1)(
        count(0)
    ).Else(
        count.inc()
    )

    seq.If(count == 1024 - 1)(
        led.inc()
    )

    seq(
        Systask('display', "LED:%d count:%d", led, count)
    )

    return m


def mkTest():
    m = Module('test')

    # target instance
    led = mkLed()

    uut = Submodule(m, led, name='uut')
    clk = uut['CLK']
    rst = uut['RST']

    simulation.setup_waveform(m, uut, m.get_vars())
    simulation.setup_clock(m, clk, hperiod=5)
    init = simulation.setup_reset(m, rst, m.make_reset(), period=100)

    init.add(
        Delay(1000 * 100),
        Systask('finish'),
    )

    return m

if __name__ == '__main__':
    test = mkTest()
    verilog = test.to_verilog(filename='tmp.v')
    #verilog = test.to_verilog()
    print(verilog)

    sim = simulation.Simulator(test)
    rslt = sim.run()
    print(rslt)

    # sim.view_waveform()

Run the script.

python hello_led.py

You will have a complete Verilog HDL source code named ‘tmp.v’ as below, which is generated by the source code generator.

module test
(

);

  localparam uut_WIDTH = 8;
  reg uut_CLK;
  reg uut_RST;
  wire [uut_WIDTH-1:0] uut_LED;

  blinkled
  uut
  (
    .CLK(uut_CLK),
    .RST(uut_RST),
    .LED(uut_LED)
  );


  initial begin
    $dumpfile("uut.vcd");
    $dumpvars(0, uut, uut_CLK, uut_RST, uut_LED);
  end


  initial begin
    uut_CLK = 0;
    forever begin
      #5 uut_CLK = !uut_CLK;
    end
  end


  initial begin
    uut_RST = 0;
    #100;
    uut_RST = 1;
    #100;
    uut_RST = 0;
    #100000;
    $finish;
  end


endmodule



module blinkled #
(
  parameter WIDTH = 8
)
(
  input CLK,
  input RST,
  output reg [WIDTH-1:0] LED
);

  reg [32-1:0] count;

  always @(posedge CLK) begin
    if(RST) begin
      count <= 0;
      LED <= 0;
    end else begin
      if(count == 1023) begin
        count <= 0;
      end else begin
        count <= count + 1;
      end
      if(count == 1023) begin
        LED <= LED + 1;
      end
      $display("LED:%d count:%d", LED, count);
    end
  end


endmodule

You will also see the simulation result of the generated Verilog code on Icarus Verilog.

VCD info: dumpfile uut.vcd opened for output.
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  x count:         x
LED:  0 count:         0
LED:  0 count:         1
LED:  0 count:         2
LED:  0 count:         3
LED:  0 count:         4
...
LED:  9 count:       777
LED:  9 count:       778
LED:  9 count:       779
LED:  9 count:       780
LED:  9 count:       781
LED:  9 count:       782
LED:  9 count:       783

If you installed GTKwave and enable ‘sim.view_waveform()’ in ‘hello_led.py’, you can see the waveform the simulation result.

waveform.png

Veriloggen Extension Libraries

  • veriloggen.verilog: Verilog HDL source code synthesis and import APIs
  • veriloggen.simulation: Simulation APIs via Verilog simulators
  • veriloggen.seq: Synchronous circuit builder (Seq)
  • veriloggen.fsm: Finite state machine builder (FSM)
  • veriloggen.types: Library of frequently-used structure, such as memory, fixed-point, AXI bus, etc.
  • veriloggen.dataflow: Dataflow-based stream processing hardware builder
  • veriloggen.thread: Tightly-coupled high-level synthesis compiler emedded within Veriloggen HDL
Release History

Release History

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0.1.1

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