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Project Description

withrestart: structured error recovery using named restart functions

This is a Pythonisation (Lispers might rightly say “bastardisation”) of the restart-based condition system of Common Lisp. It’s designed to make error recovery simpler and easier by removing the assumption that unhandled errors must be fatal.

A “restart” represents a named strategy for resuming execution of a function after the occurrence of an error. At any point during its execution a function can push a Restart object onto its call stack. If an exception occurs within the scope of that Restart, code higher-up in the call chain can invoke it to recover from the error and let the function continue execution. By providing several restarts, functions can offer several different strategies for recovering from errors.

A “handler” represents a higher-level strategy for dealing with the occurrence of an error. It is conceptually similar to an “except” clause, in that one establishes a suite of Handler objects to be invoked if an error occurs during the execution of some code. There is, however, a crucial difference: handlers are executed without unwinding the call stack. They thus have the opportunity to take corrective action and then resume execution of whatever function raised the error.

For example, consider a function that reads the contents of all files from a directory into a dict in memory:

def readall(dirname):
    data = {}
    for filename in os.listdir(dirname):
        filepath = os.path.join(dirname,filename)
        data[filename] = open(filepath).read()
    return data

If one of the files goes missing after the call to os.listdir() then the subsequent open() will raise an IOError. While we could catch and handle the error inside this function, what would be the appropriate action? Should files that go missing be silently ignored? Should they be re-created with some default contents? Should a special sentinel value be placed in the data dictionary? What value? The readall() function does not have enough information to decide on an appropriate recovery strategy.

Instead, readall() can provide the infrastructure for doing error recovery and leave the final decision up to the calling code. The following definition uses three pre-defined restarts to let the calling code (a) skip the missing file completely, (2) retry the call to open() after taking some corrective action, or (3) use some other value in place of the missing file:

def readall(dirname):
    data = {}
    for filename in os.listdir(dirname):
        filepath = os.path.join(dirname,filename)
        with restarts(skip,retry,use_value) as invoke:
            data[filename] = invoke(open,filepath).read()
    return data

Of note here is the use of the “with” statement to establish a new context in the scope of restarts, and use of the “invoke” wrapper when calling a function that might fail. The latter allows restarts to inject an alternate return value for the failed function.

Here’s how the calling code would look if it wanted to silently skip the missing file:

def concatenate(dirname):
    with Handler(IOError,"skip"):
        data = readall(dirname)
    return "".join(data.itervalues())

This pushes a Handler instance into the execution context, which will detect IOError instances and respond by invoking the “skip” restart point. If this handler is invoked in response to an IOError, execution of the readall() function will continue immediately following the “with restarts(…)” block.

Note that there is no way to achieve this skip-and-continue behaviour using an ordinary try-except block; by the time the IOError has propagated up to the concatenate() function for processing, all context from the execution of readall() will have been unwound and cannot be resumed.

Calling code that wanted to re-create the missing file would simply push a different error handler:

def concatenate(dirname):
    def handle_IOError(e):
        open(e.filename,"w").write("MISSING")
        raise InvokeRestart("retry")
    with Handler(IOError,handle_IOError):
        data = readall(dirname)
    return "".join(data.itervalues())

By raising InvokeRestart, this handler transfers control back to the restart that was established by the readall() function. This particular restart will re-execute the failing function call and let readall() continue with its operation.

Calling code that wanted to use a special sentinel value would use a handler to pass the required value to the “use_value” restart:

def concatenate(dirname):
    class MissingFile:
        def read():
            return "MISSING"
    def handle_IOError(e):
        raise InvokeRestart("use_value",MissingFile())
    with Handler(IOError,handle_IOError):
        data = readall(dirname)
    return "".join(data.itervalues())

By separating the low-level details of recovering from an error from the high-level strategy of what action to take, it’s possible to create quite powerful recovery mechanisms.

While this module provides a handful of pre-built restarts, functions will usually want to create their own. This can be done by passing a callback into the Restart object constructor:

def readall(dirname):
    data = {}
    for filename in os.listdir(dirname):
        filepath = os.path.join(dirname,filename)
        def log_error():
            print "an error occurred"
        with Restart(log_error):
            data[filename] = open(filepath).read()
    return data

Or by using a decorator to define restarts inline:

def readall(dirname):
    data = {}
    for filename in os.listdir(dirname):
        filepath = os.path.join(dirname,filename)
        with restarts() as invoke:
            @invoke.add_restart
            def log_error():
                print "an error occurred"
            data[filename] = open(filepath).read()
    return data

Handlers can also be defined inline using a similar syntax:

def concatenate(dirname):
    with handlers() as h:
        @h.add_handler
        def IOError(e):
            open(e.filename,"w").write("MISSING")
            raise InvokeRestart("retry")
        data = readall(dirname)
    return "".join(data.itervalues())

Now finally, a disclaimer. I’ve never written any Common Lisp. I’ve only read about the Common Lisp condition system and how awesome it is. I’m sure there are many things that it can do that this module simply cannot. For example:

  • Since this is built on top of a standard exception-throwing system, the handlers can only be executed after the stack has been unwound to the most recent restart context; in Common Lisp they’re executed without unwinding the stack at all.
  • Since this is built on top of a standard exception-throwing system, it’s probably too heavyweight to use for generic condition signalling system.

Nevertheless, there’s no shame in pinching a good idea when you see one…

Release History

Release History

0.2.7

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0.2.1

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0.2.0

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0.1.0

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File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
withrestart-0.2.7.tar.gz (13.5 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Oct 19, 2010

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