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Project Description

This package provides a modular table rendering implementation for Zope3.

z3c Table

The goal of this package is to offer a modular table rendering library. We use the content provider pattern and the column are implemented as adapters which will give us a powerful base concept.

Some important concepts we use

  • separate implementation in update render parts, This allows to manipulate data after update call and before we render them.
  • allow to use page templates if needed. By default all is done in python.
  • allow to use the rendered batch outside the existing table HTML part.

No skins

This package does not provide any kind of template or skin support. Most the time if you need to render a table, you will use your own skin concept. This means you can render the table or batch within your own templates. This will ensure that we have as few dependencies as possible in this package and the package can get reused with any skin concept.

Note

As you probably know, batching is only possible after sorting columns. This is a nightmare if it comes to performance. The reason is, all data need to get sorted before the batch can start at the given position. And sorting can most of the time only be done by touching each object. This means you have to be careful if you are using a large set of data, even if you use batching.

Sample data setup

Let’s create a sample container which we can use as our iterable context:

>>> from zope.container import btree
>>> class Container(btree.BTreeContainer):
...     """Sample container."""
...     __name__ = u'container'
>>> container = Container()

and set a parent for the container:

>>> root['container'] = container

and create a sample content object which we use as container item:

>>> class Content(object):
...     """Sample content."""
...     def __init__(self, title, number):
...         self.title = title
...         self.number = number

Now setup some items:

>>> container[u'first'] = Content('First', 1)
>>> container[u'second'] = Content('Second', 2)
>>> container[u'third'] = Content('Third', 3)

Table

Create a test request and represent the table:

>>> from zope.publisher.browser import TestRequest
>>> from z3c.table import table
>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> plainTable = table.Table(container, request)
>>> plainTable.cssClassSortedOn = None

Now we can update and render the table. As you can see with an empty container we will not get anything that looks like a table. We just get an empty string:

>>> plainTable.update()
>>> plainTable.render()
u''

Column Adapter

We can create a column for our table:

>>> import zope.component
>>> from z3c.table import interfaces
>>> from z3c.table import column
>>> class TitleColumn(column.Column):
...
...     weight = 10
...     header = u'Title'
...
...     def renderCell(self, item):
...         return u'Title: %s' % item.title

Now we can register the column:

>>> zope.component.provideAdapter(TitleColumn,
...     (None, None, interfaces.ITable), provides=interfaces.IColumn,
...      name='firstColumn')

Now we can render the table again:

>>> plainTable.update()
>>> print plainTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Title</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

We can also use the predefined name column:

>>> zope.component.provideAdapter(column.NameColumn,
...     (None, None, interfaces.ITable), provides=interfaces.IColumn,
...      name='secondColumn')

Now we will get an additional column:

>>> plainTable.update()
>>> print plainTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Title</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>first</td>
      <td>Title: First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>second</td>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>third</td>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Colspan

Now let’s show how we can define a colspan condition of 2 for a column:

>>> class ColspanColumn(column.NameColumn):
...
...     weight = 999
...
...     def getColspan(self, item):
...         # colspan condition
...         if item.__name__ == 'first':
...             return 2
...         else:
...             return 0
...
...     def renderHeadCell(self):
...         return u'Colspan'
...
...     def renderCell(self, item):
...         return u'colspan: %s' % item.title

Now we register this column adapter as colspanColumn:

>>> zope.component.provideAdapter(ColspanColumn,
...     (None, None, interfaces.ITable), provides=interfaces.IColumn,
...      name='colspanColumn')

Now you can see that the colspan of the ColspanAdapter is larger than the table. This will raise a ValueError:

>>> plainTable.update()
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
ValueError: Colspan for column '<ColspanColumn u'colspanColumn'>' is larger than the table.

But if we set the column as first row, it will render the colspan correctly:

>>> class CorrectColspanColumn(ColspanColumn):
...     """Colspan with correct weight."""
...
...     weight = 0

Register and render the table again:

>>> zope.component.provideAdapter(CorrectColspanColumn,
...     (None, None, interfaces.ITable), provides=interfaces.IColumn,
...      name='colspanColumn')
>>> plainTable.update()
>>> print plainTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Colspan</th>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Title</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td colspan="2">colspan: First</td>
      <td>Title: First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>colspan: Second</td>
      <td>second</td>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>colspan: Third</td>
      <td>third</td>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Setup columns

The existing implementation allows us to define a table in a class without using the modular adapter pattern for columns.

First we need to define a column which can render a value for our items:

>>> class SimpleColumn(column.Column):
...
...     weight = 0
...
...     def renderCell(self, item):
...         return item.title

Let’s define our table which defines the columns explicitly. you can also see that we do not return the columns in the correct order:

>>> class PrivateTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         firstColumn = TitleColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         firstColumn.__name__ = u'title'
...         firstColumn.weight = 1
...         secondColumn = SimpleColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         secondColumn.__name__ = u'simple'
...         secondColumn.weight = 2
...         secondColumn.header = u'The second column'
...         return [secondColumn, firstColumn]

Now we can create, update and render the table and see that this renders a nice table too:

>>> privateTable = PrivateTable(container, request)
>>> privateTable.update()
>>> print privateTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Title</th>
      <th>The second column</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: First</td>
      <td>First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
      <td>Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
      <td>Third</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Cascading Style Sheet

Our table and column implementation supports css class assignment. Let’s define a table and columns with some css class values:

>>> class CSSTable(table.Table):
...
...     cssClasses = {'table': 'table',
...                   'thead': 'thead',
...                   'tbody': 'tbody',
...                   'th': 'th',
...                   'tr': 'tr',
...                   'td': 'td'}
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         firstColumn = TitleColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         firstColumn.__name__ = u'title'
...         firstColumn.__parent__ = self
...         firstColumn.weight = 1
...         firstColumn.cssClasses = {'th':'thCol', 'td':'tdCol'}
...         secondColumn = SimpleColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         secondColumn.__name__ = u'simple'
...         secondColumn.__parent__ = self
...         secondColumn.weight = 2
...         secondColumn.header = u'The second column'
...         return [secondColumn, firstColumn]

Now let’s see if we got the css class assigned which we defined in the table and column. Note that the th and td got CSS declarations from the table and from the column:

>>> cssTable = CSSTable(container, request)
>>> cssTable.update()
>>> print cssTable.render()
<table class="table">
  <thead class="thead">
    <tr class="tr">
      <th class="thCol th">Title</th>
      <th class="th">The second column</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody class="tbody">
    <tr class="tr">
      <td class="tdCol td">Title: First</td>
      <td class="td">First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="tr">
      <td class="tdCol td">Title: Second</td>
      <td class="td">Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="tr">
      <td class="tdCol td">Title: Third</td>
      <td class="td">Third</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Alternating table

We offer built in support for alternating table rows based on even and odd CSS classes. Let’s define a table including other CSS classes. For even/odd support, we only need to define the cssClassEven and cssClassOdd CSS classes:

>>> class AlternatingTable(table.Table):
...
...     cssClasses = {'table': 'table',
...                   'thead': 'thead',
...                   'tbody': 'tbody',
...                   'th': 'th',
...                   'tr': 'tr',
...                   'td': 'td'}
...
...     cssClassEven = u'even'
...     cssClassOdd = u'odd'
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         firstColumn = TitleColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         firstColumn.__name__ = u'title'
...         firstColumn.__parent__ = self
...         firstColumn.weight = 1
...         firstColumn.cssClasses = {'th':'thCol', 'td':'tdCol'}
...         secondColumn = SimpleColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         secondColumn.__name__ = u'simple'
...         secondColumn.__parent__ = self
...         secondColumn.weight = 2
...         secondColumn.header = u'The second column'
...         return [secondColumn, firstColumn]

Now update and render the new table. As you can see the given tr class is added to the even and odd classes:

>>> alternatingTable = AlternatingTable(container, request)
>>> alternatingTable.update()
>>> print alternatingTable.render()
<table class="table">
  <thead class="thead">
    <tr class="tr">
      <th class="thCol th">Title</th>
      <th class="th">The second column</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody class="tbody">
    <tr class="even tr">
      <td class="tdCol td">Title: First</td>
      <td class="td">First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="odd tr">
      <td class="tdCol td">Title: Second</td>
      <td class="td">Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="even tr">
      <td class="tdCol td">Title: Third</td>
      <td class="td">Third</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Class based Table setup

There is a more elegant way to define table rows at class level. We offer a method which you can use if you need to define some columns called addColumn. Before we define the table. let’s define some cell renderer:

>>> def headCellRenderer():
...     return u'My items'
>>> def cellRenderer(item):
...     return u'%s item' % item.title

Now we can define our table and use the custom cell renderer:

>>> class AddColumnTable(table.Table):
...
...     cssClasses = {'table': 'table',
...                   'thead': 'thead',
...                   'tbody': 'tbody',
...                   'th': 'th',
...                   'tr': 'tr',
...                   'td': 'td'}
...
...     cssClassEven = u'even'
...     cssClassOdd = u'odd'
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, TitleColumn, u'title',
...                              cellRenderer=cellRenderer,
...                              headCellRenderer=headCellRenderer,
...                              weight=1, colspan=0),
...             column.addColumn(self, SimpleColumn, name=u'simple',
...                              weight=2, header=u'The second column',
...                              cssClasses = {'th':'thCol', 'td':'tdCol'})
...             ]

Add some more content:

>>> container[u'fourth'] = Content('Fourth', 4)
>>> container[u'zero'] = Content('Zero', 0)

>>> addColumnTable = AddColumnTable(container, request)
>>> addColumnTable.update()
>>> print addColumnTable.render()
<table class="table">
  <thead class="thead">
    <tr class="tr">
      <th class="th">My items</th>
      <th class="thCol th">The second column</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody class="tbody">
    <tr class="even tr">
      <td class="td">First item</td>
      <td class="tdCol td">First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="odd tr">
      <td class="td">Fourth item</td>
      <td class="tdCol td">Fourth</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="even tr">
      <td class="td">Second item</td>
      <td class="tdCol td">Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="odd tr">
      <td class="td">Third item</td>
      <td class="tdCol td">Third</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="even tr">
      <td class="td">Zero item</td>
      <td class="tdCol td">Zero</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

As you can see the table columns provide all attributes we set in the addColumn method:

>>> titleColumn = addColumnTable.rows[0][0][1]
>>> titleColumn
<TitleColumn u'title'>
>>> titleColumn.__name__
u'title'
>>> titleColumn.__parent__
<AddColumnTable None>
>>> titleColumn.colspan
0
>>> titleColumn.weight
1
>>> titleColumn.header
u'Title'
>>> titleColumn.cssClasses
{}

and the second column:

>>> simpleColumn = addColumnTable.rows[0][1][1]
>>> simpleColumn
<SimpleColumn u'simple'>
>>> simpleColumn.__name__
u'simple'
>>> simpleColumn.__parent__
<AddColumnTable None>
>>> simpleColumn.colspan
0
>>> simpleColumn.weight
2
>>> simpleColumn.header
u'The second column'
>>> simpleColumn.cssClasses
{'td': 'tdCol', 'th': 'thCol'}

Headers

We can change the rendering of the header of, e.g, the Title column by registering a IHeaderColumn adapter. This may be useful for adding links to column headers for an existing table implementation.

We’ll use a fresh almost empty container.:

>>> container = Container()
>>> root['container-1'] = container
>>> container[u'first'] = Content('First', 1)
>>> container[u'second'] = Content('Second', 2)
>>> container[u'third'] = Content('Third', 3)
>>> class myTableClass(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
>>> myTable = myTableClass(container, request)
>>> class TitleColumn(column.Column):
...
...     header = u'Title'
...
...     def renderCell(self, item):
...         return item.title

Now we can register a column adapter directly to our table class:

>>> zope.component.provideAdapter(TitleColumn,
...     (None, None, myTableClass), provides=interfaces.IColumn,
...      name='titleColumn')

And add a registration for a column header - we’ll use here the provided generic sorting header implementation:

>>> from z3c.table.header import SortingColumnHeader
>>> zope.component.provideAdapter(SortingColumnHeader,
...     (None, None, interfaces.ITable, interfaces.IColumn),
...     provides=interfaces.IColumnHeader)

Now we can render the table and we shall see a link in the header. Note that it is set to switch to descending as the table initially will display the first column as ascending:

>>> myTable.update()
>>> print myTable.render()
<table>
 <thead>
  <tr>
   <th><a
    href="?table-sortOrder=descending&table-sortOn=table-titleColumn-0"
    title="Sort">Title</a></th>
...
</table>

If the table is initially set to descending, the link should allow to switch to ascending again:

>>> myTable.sortOrder = 'descending'
>>> print myTable.render()
<table>
 <thead>
  <tr>
   <th><a
    href="?table-sortOrder=ascending&table-sortOn=table-titleColumn-0"
    title="Sort">Title</a></th>
...
</table>

If the table is ascending but the request was descending, the link should allow to switch again to ascending:

>>> descendingRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-sortOn': 'table-titleColumn-0',
...                                   'table-sortOrder':'descending'})
>>> myTable = myTableClass(container, descendingRequest)
>>> myTable.sortOrder = 'ascending'
>>> myTable.update()
>>> print myTable.render()
<table>
 <thead>
  <tr>
   <th><a
    href="?table-sortOrder=ascending&table-sortOn=table-titleColumn-0"
    title="Sort">Title</a></th>
...
</table>

Sorting Table

Another table feature is the support for sorting data given from columns. Since sorting table data is an important feature, we offer this by default. But it only gets used if there is a sortOn value set. You can set this value at class level by adding a defaultSortOn value or set it as a request value. We show you how to do this later. We also need a columns which allows us to do a better sort sample. Our new sorting column will use the content items number value for sorting:

>>> from z3c.table import column, table
>>> class NumberColumn(column.Column):
...
...     header = u'Number'
...     weight = 20
...
...     def getSortKey(self, item):
...         return item.number
...
...     def renderCell(self, item):
...         return 'number: %s' % item.number

Now let’s set up a table:

>>> from z3c.table.testing import TitleColumn
>>> class SortingTable(table.Table):
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         firstColumn = TitleColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         firstColumn.__name__ = u'title'
...         firstColumn.__parent__ = self
...         secondColumn = NumberColumn(self.context, self.request, self)
...         secondColumn.__name__ = u'number'
...         secondColumn.__parent__ = self
...         return [firstColumn, secondColumn]

Create a container:

>>> from z3c.table.testing import OrderedContainer
>>> container = OrderedContainer()

We also need some container items that we can use for sorting:

>>> from z3c.table.testing import Content
>>> container[u'first'] = Content('First', 1)
>>> container[u'second'] = Content('Second', 2)
>>> container[u'third'] = Content('Third', 3)
>>> container[u'fourth'] = Content('Fourth', 4)
>>> container[u'zero'] = Content('Zero', 0)

And render them without set a sortOn value:

>>> from zope.publisher.browser import TestRequest
>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> sortingTable = SortingTable(container, request)
>>> sortingTable.update()
>>> print sortingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th class="sorted-on ascending">Title</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: First</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Fourth</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Second</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Third</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Zero</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Ooops, well, by default the table is sorted on the first column, ascending.

>>> sortingTable.sortOn
0

Now switch off sorting, now we get the original order:

>>> sortingTable.sortOn = None
>>> sortingTable.update()
>>> print sortingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Title</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: First</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Fourth</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Zero</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

As you can see this table doesn’t provide any explicit order. Let’s find out the index of our column that we like to sort on:

>>> sortOnId = sortingTable.rows[0][1][1].id
>>> sortOnId
u'table-number-1'

And let’s use this id as sortOn value:

>>> sortingTable.sortOn = sortOnId

An important thing is to update the table after set an sortOn value:

>>> sortingTable.update()
>>> print sortingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Title</th>
      <th class="sorted-on ascending">Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Zero</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 0</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: First</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Fourth</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 4</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

We can also reverse the sorting order:

>>> sortingTable.sortOrder = 'reverse'
>>> sortingTable.update()
>>> print sortingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Title</th>
      <th class="sorted-on reverse">Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Fourth</td>
      <td class="sorted-on reverse">number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
      <td class="sorted-on reverse">number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
      <td class="sorted-on reverse">number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: First</td>
      <td class="sorted-on reverse">number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Zero</td>
      <td class="sorted-on reverse">number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

The table implementation is also able to get the sorting criteria given from a request. Let’s setup such a request:

>>> sorterRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-sortOn': 'table-number-1',
...                                   'table-sortOrder':'descending'})

and another time, update and render. As you can see the new table gets sorted by the second column and ordered in reverse order:

>>> requestSortedTable = SortingTable(container, sorterRequest)
>>> requestSortedTable.update()
>>> print requestSortedTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Title</th>
      <th class="sorted-on descending">Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Fourth</td>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: First</td>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Zero</td>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

There’s a header renderer, which provides a handy link rendering for sorting:

>>> import zope.component
>>> from z3c.table import interfaces
>>> from z3c.table.header import SortingColumnHeader
>>> zope.component.provideAdapter(SortingColumnHeader,
...     (None, None, interfaces.ITable, interfaces.IColumn),
...     provides=interfaces.IColumnHeader)

Let’s see now various sortings:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> sortingTable = SortingTable(container, request)
>>> sortingTable.update()
>>> sortingTable.sortOn
0
>>> sortingTable.sortOrder
u'ascending'
>>> print sortingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th class="sorted-on ascending"><a href="?table-sortOrder=descending&table-sortOn=table-title-0" title="Sort">Title</a></th>
      <th><a href="?table-sortOrder=ascending&table-sortOn=table-number-1" title="Sort">Number</a></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: First</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Fourth</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Second</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Third</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">Title: Zero</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Let’s see the number column:

>>> sortingTable.sortOn = u'table-number-1'
>>> sortingTable.update()
>>> print sortingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th><a href="?table-sortOrder=ascending&table-sortOn=table-title-0" title="Sort">Title</a></th>
      <th class="sorted-on ascending"><a href="?table-sortOrder=descending&table-sortOn=table-number-1" title="Sort">Number</a></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Zero</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 0</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: First</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Second</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Third</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Title: Fourth</td>
      <td class="sorted-on ascending">number: 4</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Let’s see the title column but descending:

>>> sortingTable.sortOn = u'table-title-0'
>>> sortingTable.sortOrder = 'descending'
>>> sortingTable.update()
>>> print sortingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th class="sorted-on descending"><a href="?table-sortOrder=ascending&table-sortOn=table-title-0" title="Sort">Title</a></th>
      <th><a href="?table-sortOrder=descending&table-sortOn=table-number-1" title="Sort">Number</a></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">Title: Zero</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">Title: Third</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">Title: Second</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">Title: Fourth</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="sorted-on descending">Title: First</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Batching

Our table implements batching out of the box. If the amount of row items is smaller than the given startBatchingAt size, the table starts to batch at this size. Let’s define a new Table.

We need to configure our batch provider for the next step first. See the section BatchProvider below for more infos about batch rendering:

>>> from zope.configuration.xmlconfig import XMLConfig
>>> import z3c.table
>>> import zope.component
>>> XMLConfig('meta.zcml', zope.component)()
>>> XMLConfig('configure.zcml', z3c.table)()

Now we can create our table:

>>> from zope.publisher.browser import TestRequest
>>> from z3c.table.testing import Container, Content, SimpleTable
>>> container = Container()
>>> root['container-1'] = container
>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> batchingTable = SimpleTable(container, request)
>>> batchingTable.cssClassSortedOn = None

We also need to give the table a location and a name like we normally setup in traversing:

>>> batchingTable.__parent__ = container
>>> batchingTable.__name__ = u'batchingTable.html'

Now setup some items:

>>> container[u'zero'] = Content('Zero', 0)
>>> container[u'first'] = Content('First', 1)
>>> container[u'second'] = Content('Second', 2)
>>> container[u'third'] = Content('Third', 3)
>>> container[u'fourth'] = Content('Fourth', 4)
>>> container[u'sixth'] = Content('Sixth', 6)
>>> container[u'seventh'] = Content('Seventh', 7)
>>> container[u'eighth'] = Content('Eighth', 8)
>>> container[u'ninth'] = Content('Ninth', 9)
>>> container[u'tenth'] = Content('Tenth', 10)
>>> container[u'eleventh'] = Content('Eleventh', 11)
>>> container[u'twelfth '] = Content('Twelfth', 12)
>>> container[u'thirteenth'] = Content('Thirteenth', 13)
>>> container[u'fourteenth'] = Content('Fourteenth', 14)
>>> container[u'fifteenth '] = Content('Fifteenth', 15)
>>> container[u'sixteenth'] = Content('Sixteenth', 16)
>>> container[u'seventeenth'] = Content('Seventeenth', 17)
>>> container[u'eighteenth'] = Content('Eighteenth', 18)
>>> container[u'nineteenth'] = Content('Nineteenth', 19)
>>> container[u'twentieth'] = Content('Twentieth', 20)

Now let’s show the full table without batching:

>>> batchingTable.update()
>>> print batchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 18</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighth item</td>
      <td>number: 8</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eleventh item</td>
      <td>number: 11</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fifteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 15</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>First item</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 14</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourth item</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Nineteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 19</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Ninth item</td>
      <td>number: 9</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Second item</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Seventeenth item</td>
      <td>number: 17</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Seventh item</td>
      <td>number: 7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Sixteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 16</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Sixth item</td>
      <td>number: 6</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Tenth item</td>
      <td>number: 10</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Third item</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Thirteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 13</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Twelfth item</td>
      <td>number: 12</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Twentieth item</td>
      <td>number: 20</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Zero item</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

As you can see, the table is not ordered and it uses all items. If we like to use the batch, we need to set the startBatchingAt size to a lower value than it is set by default. The default value which a batch is used is set to 50:

>>> batchingTable.startBatchingAt
50

We will set the batch start to 5 for now. This means the first 5 items do not get used:

>>> batchingTable.startBatchingAt = 5
>>> batchingTable.startBatchingAt
5

There is also a batchSize value which we need to set to 5. By default the value gets initialized by the batchSize value:

>>> batchingTable.batchSize
50
>>> batchingTable.batchSize = 5
>>> batchingTable.batchSize
5

Now we can update and render the table again. But you will see that we only get a table size of 5 rows, which is correct. But the order doesn’t depend on the numbers we see in cells:

>>> batchingTable.update()
>>> print batchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 18</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighth item</td>
      <td>number: 8</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eleventh item</td>
      <td>number: 11</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fifteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 15</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>First item</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

I think we should order the table by the second column before we show the next batch values. We do this by simply set the defaultSortOn:

>>> batchingTable.sortOn = u'table-number-1'

Now we should see a nice ordered and batched table:

>>> batchingTable.update()
>>> print batchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Zero item</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>First item</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Second item</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Third item</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourth item</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

The batch concept allows us to choose from all batches and render the rows for this batched items. We can do this by set any batch as rows. as you can see we have 4 batched row data available:

>>> len(batchingTable.rows.batches)
4

We can set such a batch as row values, then this batch data are used for rendering. But take care, if we update the table, our rows get overridden and reset to the previous values. this means you can set any batch as rows data and only render them. This is possible since the update method sorted all items and all batch contain ready-to-use data. This concept could be important if you need to cache batches etc. :

>>> batchingTable.rows = batchingTable.rows.batches[1]
>>> print batchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Sixth item</td>
      <td>number: 6</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Seventh item</td>
      <td>number: 7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighth item</td>
      <td>number: 8</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Ninth item</td>
      <td>number: 9</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Tenth item</td>
      <td>number: 10</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

And like described above, if you call update our batch to rows setup get reset:

>>> batchingTable.update()
>>> print batchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Zero item</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>First item</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Second item</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Third item</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourth item</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

This means you can probably update all batches, cache them and use them after. But this is not useful for normal usage in a page without an enhanced concept which is not a part of this implementation. This also means, there must be another way to set the batch index. Yes there is, there are two other ways how we can set the batch position. We can set a batch position by setting the batchStart value in our table or we can use a request variable. Let’s show the first one first:

>>> batchingTable.batchStart = 6
>>> batchingTable.update()
>>> print batchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Seventh item</td>
      <td>number: 7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighth item</td>
      <td>number: 8</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Ninth item</td>
      <td>number: 9</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Tenth item</td>
      <td>number: 10</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eleventh item</td>
      <td>number: 11</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

We can also set the batch position by using the batchStart value in a request. Note that we need the table prefix and column __name__ like we use in the sorting concept:

>>> batchingRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-batchStart': '11',
...                                     'table-batchSize': '5',
...                                     'table-sortOn': 'table-number-1'})
>>> requestBatchingTable = SimpleTable(container, batchingRequest)
>>> requestBatchingTable.cssClassSortedOn = None

We also need to give the table a location and a name like we normally set up in traversing:

>>> requestBatchingTable.__parent__ = container
>>> requestBatchingTable.__name__ = u'requestBatchingTable.html'

Note: our table needs to start batching at smaller amount of items than we have by default otherwise we don’t get a batch:

>>> requestBatchingTable.startBatchingAt = 5
>>> requestBatchingTable.update()
>>> print requestBatchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Twelfth item</td>
      <td>number: 12</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Thirteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 13</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 14</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fifteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 15</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Sixteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 16</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

BatchProvider

The batch provider allows us to render the batch HTML independently of our table. This means by default the batch gets not rendered in the render method. You can change this in your custom table implementation and return the batch and the table in the render method.

As we can see, our table rows provides IBatch if it comes to batching:

>>> from z3c.batching.interfaces import IBatch
>>> IBatch.providedBy(requestBatchingTable.rows)
True

Let’s check some batch variables before we render our test. This let us compare the rendered result. For more information about batching see the README.txt in z3c.batching:

>>> requestBatchingTable.rows.start
11
>>> requestBatchingTable.rows.index
2
>>> requestBatchingTable.rows.batches
<z3c.batching.batch.Batches object at ...>
>>> len(requestBatchingTable.rows.batches)
4

We use our previous batching table and render the batch with the built-in renderBatch method:

>>> requestBatchingTable.update()
>>> print requestBatchingTable.renderBatch()
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=0&..." class="first">1</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=5&...">2</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=11&..." class="current">3</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=15&..." class="last">4</a>

Now let’s add more items so that we can test the skipped links in large batches:

>>> for i in range(1000):
...     idx = i+20
...     container[str(idx)] = Content(str(idx), idx)

Now let’s test the batching table again with the new amount of items and the same startBatchingAt of 5 but starting the batch at item 100 and sorted on the second numbered column:

>>> batchingRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-batchStart': '100',
...                                     'table-batchSize': '5',
...                                     'table-sortOn': 'table-number-1'})
>>> requestBatchingTable = SimpleTable(container, batchingRequest)
>>> requestBatchingTable.startBatchingAt = 5
>>> requestBatchingTable.cssClassSortedOn = None

We also need to give the table a location and a name like we normally setup in traversing:

>>> requestBatchingTable.__parent__ = container
>>> requestBatchingTable.__name__ = u'requestBatchingTable.html'
>>> requestBatchingTable.update()
>>> print requestBatchingTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>100 item</td>
      <td>number: 100</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>101 item</td>
      <td>number: 101</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>102 item</td>
      <td>number: 102</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>103 item</td>
      <td>number: 103</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>104 item</td>
      <td>number: 104</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

And test the batch. Note the three dots between the links are rendered by the batch provider and are not a part of the doctest:

>>> print requestBatchingTable.renderBatch()
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=0&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="first">1</a>
...
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=85&table-sortOn=table-number-1">18</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=90&table-sortOn=table-number-1">19</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=95&table-sortOn=table-number-1">20</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=100&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="current">21</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=105&table-sortOn=table-number-1">22</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=110&table-sortOn=table-number-1">23</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=115&table-sortOn=table-number-1">24</a>
...
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1015&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="last">204</a>

You can change the spacer in the batch provider if you set the batchSpacer value:

>>> from z3c.table.batch import BatchProvider
>>> from z3c.table.interfaces import IBatchProvider
>>> from zope.interface import implements
>>> class XBatchProvider(BatchProvider):
...     """Just another batch provider."""
...     implements(IBatchProvider)
...     batchSpacer = u'xxx'

Now register the new batch provider for our batching table:

>>> import zope.publisher.interfaces.browser
>>> from zope.component import getSiteManager
>>> sm = getSiteManager(container)
>>> sm.registerAdapter(XBatchProvider,
...     (zope.interface.Interface,
...      zope.publisher.interfaces.browser.IBrowserRequest,
...      SimpleTable), name='batch')

If we update and render our table, the new batch provider should get used. As you can see the spacer get changed now:

>>> requestBatchingTable.update()
>>> requestBatchingTable.batchProvider
<XBatchProvider object at ...>
>>> print requestBatchingTable.renderBatch()
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=0&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="first">1</a>
xxx
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=85&table-sortOn=table-number-1">18</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=90&table-sortOn=table-number-1">19</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=95&table-sortOn=table-number-1">20</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=100&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="current">21</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=105&table-sortOn=table-number-1">22</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=110&table-sortOn=table-number-1">23</a>
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=115&table-sortOn=table-number-1">24</a>
xxx
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1015&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="last">204</a>

Now test the extremities, need to define a new batchingRequest: Beginning by the left end point:

>>> leftBatchingRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-batchStart': '10',
...                                        'table-batchSize': '5',
...                                       'table-sortOn': 'table-number-1'})
>>> leftRequestBatchingTable = SimpleTable(container, leftBatchingRequest)
>>> leftRequestBatchingTable.__parent__ = container
>>> leftRequestBatchingTable.__name__ = u'leftRequestBatchingTable.html'
>>> leftRequestBatchingTable.update()
>>> print leftRequestBatchingTable.renderBatch()
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=0&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="first">1</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=5&table-sortOn=table-number-1">2</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=10&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="current">3</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=15&table-sortOn=table-number-1">4</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=20&table-sortOn=table-number-1">5</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=25&table-sortOn=table-number-1">6</a>
xxx
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1015&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="last">204</a>

Go on with the right extremity:

>>> rightBatchingRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-batchStart': '1005',
...                                     'table-batchSize': '5',
...                                     'table-sortOn': 'table-number-1'})
>>> rightRequestBatchingTable = SimpleTable(container, rightBatchingRequest)
>>> rightRequestBatchingTable.__parent__ = container
>>> rightRequestBatchingTable.__name__ = u'rightRequestBatchingTable.html'
>>> rightRequestBatchingTable.update()
>>> print rightRequestBatchingTable.renderBatch()
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=0&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="first">1</a>
xxx
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=990&table-sortOn=table-number-1">199</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=995&table-sortOn=table-number-1">200</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1000&table-sortOn=table-number-1">201</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1005&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="current">202</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1010&table-sortOn=table-number-1">203</a>
<a href="http://...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1015&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="last">204</a>

None previous and next batch size. Probably it doesn’t make sense but let’s show what happens if we set the previous and next batch size to 0 (zero):

>>> from z3c.table.batch import BatchProvider
>>> class ZeroBatchProvider(BatchProvider):
...     """Just another batch provider."""
...     batchSpacer = u'xxx'
...     previousBatchSize = 0
...     nextBatchSize = 0

Now register the new batch provider for our batching table:

>>> import zope.publisher.interfaces.browser
>>> sm.registerAdapter(ZeroBatchProvider,
...     (zope.interface.Interface,
...      zope.publisher.interfaces.browser.IBrowserRequest,
...      SimpleTable), name='batch')

Update the table and render the batch:

>>> requestBatchingTable.update()
>>> print requestBatchingTable.renderBatch()
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=0&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="first">1</a>
xxx
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=100&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="current">21</a>
xxx
<a href="...html?table-batchSize=5&table-batchStart=1015&table-sortOn=table-number-1" class="last">204</a>

SequenceTable

A sequence table can be used if we need to provide a table for a sequence of items instead of a mapping. Define the same sequence of items we used before we added the other 1000 items:

>>> from z3c.table.testing import Content
>>> dataSequence = []
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Zero', 0))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('First', 1))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Second', 2))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Third', 3))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Fourth', 4))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Fifth', 5))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Sixth', 6))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Seventh', 7))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Eighth', 8))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Ninth', 9))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Tenth', 10))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Eleventh', 11))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Twelfth', 12))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Thirteenth', 13))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Fourteenth', 14))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Fifteenth', 15))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Sixteenth', 16))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Seventeenth', 17))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Eighteenth', 18))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Nineteenth', 19))
>>> dataSequence.append(Content('Twentieth', 20))

Now let’s define a new SequenceTable:

>>> from z3c.table import table, column
>>> from z3c.table.testing import (TitleColumn, NumberColumn, cellRenderer,
...                                headCellRenderer)
>>> class SequenceTable(table.SequenceTable):
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, TitleColumn, u'title',
...                              cellRenderer=cellRenderer,
...                              headCellRenderer=headCellRenderer,
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]

Now we can create our table adapting our sequence:

>>> from zope.publisher.browser import TestRequest
>>> sequenceRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-batchStart': '0',
...                                     'table-sortOn': 'table-number-1'})
>>> sequenceTable = SequenceTable(dataSequence, sequenceRequest)
>>> sequenceTable.cssClassSortedOn = None

We also need to give the table a location and a name like we normally setup in traversing:

>>> from z3c.table.testing import Container
>>> container = Container()
>>> root['container-1'] = container
>>> sequenceTable.__parent__ = container
>>> sequenceTable.__name__ = u'sequenceTable.html'

We need to configure our batch provider for the next step first. See the section BatchProvider below for more infos about batch rendering:

>>> from zope.configuration.xmlconfig import XMLConfig
>>> import z3c.table
>>> import zope.component
>>> XMLConfig('meta.zcml', zope.component)()
>>> XMLConfig('configure.zcml', z3c.table)()

And update and render the sequence table:

>>> sequenceTable.update()
>>> print sequenceTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Zero item</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>First item</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Second item</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Third item</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourth item</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fifth item</td>
      <td>number: 5</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Sixth item</td>
      <td>number: 6</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Seventh item</td>
      <td>number: 7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighth item</td>
      <td>number: 8</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Ninth item</td>
      <td>number: 9</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Tenth item</td>
      <td>number: 10</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eleventh item</td>
      <td>number: 11</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Twelfth item</td>
      <td>number: 12</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Thirteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 13</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 14</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fifteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 15</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Sixteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 16</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Seventeenth item</td>
      <td>number: 17</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 18</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Nineteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 19</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Twentieth item</td>
      <td>number: 20</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

As you can see, the items get rendered based on a data sequence. Now we set the start batch at size to 5:

>>> sequenceTable.startBatchingAt = 5

And the batchSize to 5:

>>> sequenceTable.batchSize = 5

Now we can update and render the table again. But you will see that we only get a table size of 5 rows:

>>> sequenceTable.update()
>>> print sequenceTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Zero item</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>First item</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Second item</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Third item</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourth item</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

And we set the sort order to reverse even if we use batching:

>>> sequenceTable.sortOrder = u'reverse'
>>> sequenceTable.update()
>>> print sequenceTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>My items</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>Twentieth item</td>
      <td>number: 20</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Nineteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 19</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Eighteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 18</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Seventeenth item</td>
      <td>number: 17</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Sixteenth item</td>
      <td>number: 16</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Table Columns

Let’s show the different columns we offer by default. But first take a look at the README.txt which explains the Table and Column concepts.

Sample data setup

Let’s create a sample container that we can use as our iterable context:

>>> from zope.container import btree
>>> class Container(btree.BTreeContainer):
...     """Sample container."""
>>> container = Container()
>>> root['container'] = container

and create a sample content object that we use as container item:

>>> class Content(object):
...     """Sample content."""
...     def __init__(self, title, number, email):
...         self.title = title
...         self.number = number
...         self.email = email

Now setup some items:

>>> container[u'zero'] = Content('Zero', 0, 'zero@example.com')
>>> container[u'first'] = Content('First', 1, 'first@example.com')
>>> container[u'second'] = Content('Second', 2, 'second@example.com')
>>> container[u'third'] = Content('Third', 3, 'third@example.com')
>>> container[u'fourth'] = Content('Fourth', 4, None)

Let’s also create a simple number sortable column:

>>> from z3c.table import column
>>> class NumberColumn(column.Column):
...
...     header = u'Number'
...     weight = 20
...
...     def getSortKey(self, item):
...         return item.number
...
...     def renderCell(self, item):
...         return 'number: %s' % item.number

NameColumn

Let’s define a table using the NameColumn:

>>> from z3c.table import table
>>> class NameTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.NameColumn, u'name',
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]

Now create, update and render our table and you can see that the NameColumn renders the name of the item using the zope.traversing.api.getName() concept:

>>> from zope.publisher.browser import TestRequest
>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> nameTable = NameTable(container, request)
>>> nameTable.update()
>>> print nameTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>first</td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>fourth</td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>second</td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>third</td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>zero</td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

RadioColumn

Let’s define a table using the RadioColumn:

>>> class RadioTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.RadioColumn, u'radioColumn',
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]

Now create, update and render our table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> radioTable = RadioTable(container, request)
>>> radioTable.update()
>>> print radioTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>X</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="first"  /></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="fourth"  /></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="second"  /></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="third"  /></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="zero"  /></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

As you can see, we can force to render the radio input field as selected with a given request value:

>>> radioRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem': 'third'})
>>> radioTable = RadioTable(container, radioRequest)
>>> radioTable.update()
>>> print radioTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>X</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="first"  /></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="fourth"  /></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="second"  /></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="third" checked="checked" /></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="radio" class="radio-widget" name="table-radioColumn-0-selectedItem" value="zero"  /></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

CheckBoxColumn

Let’s define a table using the RadioColumn:

>>> class CheckBoxTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.CheckBoxColumn, u'checkBoxColumn',
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]

Now create, update and render our table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> checkBoxTable = CheckBoxTable(container, request)
>>> checkBoxTable.update()
>>> print checkBoxTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>X</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="first"  /></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="fourth"  /></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="second"  /></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="third"  /></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="zero"  /></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

And again you can set force to render the checkbox input field as selected with a given request value:

>>> checkBoxRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems':
...                                     ['first', 'third']})
>>> checkBoxTable = CheckBoxTable(container, checkBoxRequest)
>>> checkBoxTable.update()
>>> print checkBoxTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>X</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="first" checked="checked" /></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="fourth"  /></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="second"  /></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="third" checked="checked" /></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="zero"  /></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

If you select a row, you can also give them an additional CSS style. This could be used in combination with alternating even and odd styles:

>>> checkBoxRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems':
...                                     ['first', 'third']})
>>> checkBoxTable = CheckBoxTable(container, checkBoxRequest)
>>> checkBoxTable.cssClasses = {'tr': 'tr'}
>>> checkBoxTable.cssClassSelected = u'selected'
>>> checkBoxTable.cssClassEven = u'even'
>>> checkBoxTable.cssClassOdd = u'odd'
>>> checkBoxTable.update()
>>> print checkBoxTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr class="tr">
      <th>X</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr class="selected even tr">
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="first" checked="checked" /></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="odd tr">
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="fourth"  /></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="even tr">
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="second"  /></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="selected odd tr">
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="third" checked="checked" /></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="even tr">
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="zero"  /></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Let’s test the cssClassSelected without any other css class:

>>> checkBoxRequest = TestRequest(form={'table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems':
...                                     ['first', 'third']})
>>> checkBoxTable = CheckBoxTable(container, checkBoxRequest)
>>> checkBoxTable.cssClassSelected = u'selected'
>>> checkBoxTable.update()
>>> print checkBoxTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>X</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr class="selected">
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="first" checked="checked" /></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="fourth"  /></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="second"  /></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="selected">
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="third" checked="checked" /></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" class="checkbox-widget" name="table-checkBoxColumn-0-selectedItems" value="zero"  /></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

CreatedColumn

Let’s define a table using the CreatedColumn:

>>> class CreatedColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.CreatedColumn, u'createdColumn',
...                              weight=1),
...             ]

Now create, update and render our table. Note, we use a Dublin Core stub adapter which only returns 01/01/01 01:01 as created date:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> createdColumnTable = CreatedColumnTable(container, request)
>>> createdColumnTable.update()
>>> print createdColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Created</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>01/01/01 01:01</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>01/01/01 01:01</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>01/01/01 01:01</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>01/01/01 01:01</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>01/01/01 01:01</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

ModifiedColumn

Let’s define a table using the CreatedColumn:

>>> class ModifiedColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.ModifiedColumn,
...                              u'modifiedColumn', weight=1),
...             ]

Now create, update and render our table. Note, we use a Dublin Core stub adapter which only returns 02/02/02 02:02 as modified date:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> modifiedColumnTable = ModifiedColumnTable(container, request)
>>> modifiedColumnTable.update()
>>> print modifiedColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Modified</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>02/02/02 02:02</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>02/02/02 02:02</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>02/02/02 02:02</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>02/02/02 02:02</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>02/02/02 02:02</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

GetAttrColumn

The GetAttrColumn column is a handy column that retrieves the value from the item by attribute access. It also provides a defaultValue in case an exception happens.

>>> class GetTitleColumn(column.GetAttrColumn):
...
...     attrName = 'title'
...     defaultValue = u'missing'
>>> class GetAttrColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, GetTitleColumn, u'title'),
...             ]

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> getAttrColumnTable = GetAttrColumnTable(container, request)
>>> getAttrColumnTable.update()
>>> print getAttrColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>First</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Fourth</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Second</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Third</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Zero</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

If we use a non-existing Attribute, we do not raise an AttributeError, we will get the default value:

>>> class UndefinedAttributeColumn(column.GetAttrColumn):
...
...     attrName = 'undefined'
...     defaultValue = u'missing'
>>> class GetAttrColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, UndefinedAttributeColumn, u'missing'),
...             ]

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> getAttrColumnTable = GetAttrColumnTable(container, request)
>>> getAttrColumnTable.update()
>>> print getAttrColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

A missing attrName in GetAttrColumn would also end in return the defaultValue:

>>> class BadAttributeColumn(column.GetAttrColumn):
...
...     defaultValue = u'missing'
>>> firstItem = container[u'first']
>>> simpleTable = table.Table(container, request)
>>> badColumn = column.addColumn(simpleTable, BadAttributeColumn, u'bad')
>>> badColumn.renderCell(firstItem)
u'missing'

If we try to access a protected attribute the object raises an Unauthorized. In this case we also return the defaultValue. Let’s setup an object which raises such an error if we access the title:

>>> from zope.security.interfaces import Unauthorized
>>> class ProtectedItem(object):
...
...     @property
...     def forbidden(self):
...         raise Unauthorized, 'forbidden'

Setup and test the item:

>>> protectedItem = ProtectedItem()
>>> protectedItem.forbidden
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
Unauthorized: forbidden

Now define a column:

>>> class ForbiddenAttributeColumn(column.GetAttrColumn):
...
...     attrName = 'forbidden'
...     defaultValue = u'missing'

And test the attribute access:

>>> simpleTable = table.Table(container, request)
>>> badColumn = column.addColumn(simpleTable, ForbiddenAttributeColumn, u'x')
>>> badColumn.renderCell(protectedItem)
u'missing'

GetItemColumn

The GetItemColumn column is a handy column that retrieves the value from the item by index or key access. That means the item can be a tuple, list, dict or anything that implements that. It also provides a defaultValue in case an exception happens.

Dict-ish

>>> sampleDictData = [
...     dict(name='foo', value=1),
...     dict(name='bar', value=7),
...     dict(name='moo', value=42),]
>>> class GetDictColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.GetItemColumn, u'name',
...                              header=u'Name',
...                              idx='name', defaultValue='missing'),
...             column.addColumn(self, column.GetItemColumn, u'value',
...                              header=u'Value',
...                              idx='value', defaultValue='missing'),
...             ]
...     @property
...     def values(self):
...         return sampleDictData

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> getDictColumnTable = GetDictColumnTable(sampleDictData, request)
>>> getDictColumnTable.update()
>>> print getDictColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Value</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>bar</td>
      <td>7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>foo</td>
      <td>1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>moo</td>
      <td>42</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

If we use a non-existing index/key, we do not raise an exception, we will get the default value:

>>> class GetDictColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.GetItemColumn, u'name',
...                              idx='not-existing', defaultValue='missing'),
...             ]
...     @property
...     def values(self):
...         return sampleDictData

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> getDictColumnTable = GetDictColumnTable(container, request)
>>> getDictColumnTable.update()
>>> print getDictColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

A missing idx in GetItemColumn would also end in return the defaultValue:

>>> class BadIdxColumn(column.GetItemColumn):
...
...     defaultValue = u'missing'
>>> firstItem = sampleDictData[0]
>>> simpleTable = table.Table(sampleDictData, request)
>>> badColumn = column.addColumn(simpleTable, BadIdxColumn, u'bad')
>>> badColumn.renderCell(firstItem)
u'missing'

Tuple/List-ish

>>> sampleTupleData = [
...     (50, 'bar'),
...     (42, 'cent'),
...     (7, 'bild'),]
>>> class GetTupleColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.GetItemColumn, u'name',
...                              header=u'Name',
...                              idx=1, defaultValue='missing'),
...             column.addColumn(self, column.GetItemColumn, u'value',
...                              header=u'Value',
...                              idx=0, defaultValue='missing'),
...             ]
...     @property
...     def values(self):
...         return sampleTupleData

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> getTupleColumnTable = GetTupleColumnTable(sampleTupleData, request)
>>> getTupleColumnTable.update()
>>> print getTupleColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Value</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>bar</td>
      <td>50</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>bild</td>
      <td>7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>cent</td>
      <td>42</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

If we use a non-existing index/key, we do not raise an exception, we will get the default value:

>>> class GetTupleColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.GetItemColumn, u'name',
...                              idx=42, defaultValue='missing'),
...             ]
...     @property
...     def values(self):
...         return sampleTupleData

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> getTupleColumnTable = GetTupleColumnTable(container, request)
>>> getTupleColumnTable.update()
>>> print getTupleColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

A missing idx in GetItemColumn would also end in return the defaultValue:

>>> class BadIdxColumn(column.GetItemColumn):
...
...     defaultValue = u'missing'
>>> firstItem = sampleTupleData[0]
>>> simpleTable = table.Table(sampleTupleData, request)
>>> badColumn = column.addColumn(simpleTable, BadIdxColumn, u'bad')
>>> badColumn.renderCell(firstItem)
u'missing'

GetAttrFormatterColumn

The GetAttrFormatterColumn column is a get attr column which is able to format the value. Let’s use the Dublin Core adapter for our sample:

>>> from zope.dublincore.interfaces import IZopeDublinCore
>>> class GetCreatedColumn(column.GetAttrFormatterColumn):
...
...     def getValue(self, item):
...         dc = IZopeDublinCore(item, None)
...         return dc.created
>>> class GetAttrFormatterColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, GetCreatedColumn, u'created'),
...             ]

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> getAttrFormatterColumnTable = GetAttrFormatterColumnTable(container,
...     request)
>>> getAttrFormatterColumnTable.update()
>>> print getAttrFormatterColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 </td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

We can also change the formatter settings in such a column:

>>> class LongCreatedColumn(column.GetAttrFormatterColumn):
...
...     formatterCategory = u'dateTime'
...     formatterLength = u'long'
...     formatterCalendar = u'gregorian'
...
...     def getValue(self, item):
...         dc = IZopeDublinCore(item, None)
...         return dc.created
>>> class LongFormatterColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, LongCreatedColumn, u'created'),
...             ]

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> longFormatterColumnTable = LongFormatterColumnTable(container,
...     request)
>>> longFormatterColumnTable.update()
>>> print longFormatterColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th></th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 +000</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 +000</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 +000</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 +000</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>2001 1 1  01:01:01 +000</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

EMailColumn

The EMailColumn column is GetAttrColumn which is used to display a mailto link. By default in the link content the e-mail address is displayed, too.

>>> class EMailColumn(column.EMailColumn):
...
...     attrName = 'email'
...     defaultValue = u'missing'
>>> class EMailColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, EMailColumn, u'email'),
...             ]

When a cell does not contain an e-mail address, the defaultValue is rendered:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> eMailColumnTable = EMailColumnTable(container, request)
>>> eMailColumnTable.update()
>>> print eMailColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>E-Mail</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:first@example.com">first@example.com</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:second@example.com">second@example.com</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:third@example.com">third@example.com</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:zero@example.com">zero@example.com</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

The link content can be overwriten by setting the linkContent attribute:

>>> class StaticEMailColumn(column.EMailColumn):
...
...     attrName = 'email'
...     defaultValue = u'missing'
...     linkContent = 'Mail me'
>>> class StaticEMailColumnTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, StaticEMailColumn, u'mail'),
...             ]

Render and update the table:

>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> staticEMailColumnTable = StaticEMailColumnTable(container, request)
>>> staticEMailColumnTable.update()
>>> print staticEMailColumnTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>E-Mail</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:first@example.com">Mail me</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:second@example.com">Mail me</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:third@example.com">Mail me</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="mailto:zero@example.com">Mail me</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>missing</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

LinkColumn

Let’s define a table using the LinkColumn. This column allows us to write columns which can point to a page with the item as context:

>>> class MyLinkColumns(column.LinkColumn):
...     linkName = 'myLink.html'
...     linkTarget = '_blank'
...     linkCSS = 'myClass'
>>> class MyLinkTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, MyLinkColumns, u'link',
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]

Now create, update and render our table:

>>> from zope.publisher.browser import TestRequest
>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> myLinkTable = MyLinkTable(container, request)
>>> myLinkTable.__parent__ = container
>>> myLinkTable.__name__ = u'myLinkTable.html'
>>> myLinkTable.update()
>>> print myLinkTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/first/myLink.html" target="_blank" class="myClass">first</a></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/fourth/myLink.html" target="_blank" class="myClass">fourth</a></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/second/myLink.html" target="_blank" class="myClass">second</a></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/third/myLink.html" target="_blank" class="myClass">third</a></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/zero/myLink.html" target="_blank" class="myClass">zero</a></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

ContentsLinkColumn

There are some predefined link columns available. This one will generate a contents.html link for each item:

>>> class ContentsLinkTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.ContentsLinkColumn, u'link',
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]
>>> contentsLinkTable = ContentsLinkTable(container, request)
>>> contentsLinkTable.__parent__ = container
>>> contentsLinkTable.__name__ = u'contentsLinkTable.html'
>>> contentsLinkTable.update()
>>> print contentsLinkTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/first/contents.html">first</a></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/fourth/contents.html">fourth</a></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/second/contents.html">second</a></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/third/contents.html">third</a></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/zero/contents.html">zero</a></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

IndexLinkColumn

This one will generate a index.html link for each item:

>>> class IndexLinkTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.IndexLinkColumn, u'link',
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]
>>> indexLinkTable = IndexLinkTable(container, request)
>>> indexLinkTable.__parent__ = container
>>> indexLinkTable.__name__ = u'indexLinkTable.html'
>>> indexLinkTable.update()
>>> print indexLinkTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/first/index.html">first</a></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/fourth/index.html">fourth</a></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/second/index.html">second</a></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/third/index.html">third</a></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/zero/index.html">zero</a></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

EditLinkColumn

And this one will generate a edit.html link for each item:

>>> class EditLinkTable(table.Table):
...     cssClassSortedOn = None
...
...     def setUpColumns(self):
...         return [
...             column.addColumn(self, column.EditLinkColumn, u'link',
...                              weight=1),
...             column.addColumn(self, NumberColumn, name=u'number',
...                              weight=2, header=u'Number')
...             ]
>>> editLinkTable = EditLinkTable(container, request)
>>> editLinkTable.__parent__ = container
>>> editLinkTable.__name__ = u'editLinkTable.html'
>>> editLinkTable.update()
>>> print editLinkTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
      <th>Number</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/first/edit.html">first</a></td>
      <td>number: 1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/fourth/edit.html">fourth</a></td>
      <td>number: 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/second/edit.html">second</a></td>
      <td>number: 2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/third/edit.html">third</a></td>
      <td>number: 3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td><a href="http://127.0.0.1/container/zero/edit.html">zero</a></td>
      <td>number: 0</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Miscellaneous

Make coverage report happy and test different things.

Test if the getWeight method returns 0 (zero) on AttributeError:

>>> from z3c.table.table import getWeight
>>> getWeight(None)
0

Create a container:

>>> from z3c.table.testing import Container
>>> container = Container()

Try to call a simple table and call renderBatch which should return an empty string:

>>> from z3c.table import table
>>> from zope.publisher.browser import TestRequest
>>> request = TestRequest()
>>> simpleTable = table.Table(container, request)
>>> simpleTable.renderBatch()
u''

Try to render an empty table adapting an empty mapping:

>>> simpleTable = table.Table({}, request)
>>> simpleTable.cssClassSortedOn = None
>>> simpleTable.render()
u''

Since we register an adapter for IColumn on None (IOW on an empty mapping).

>>> from zope.component import provideAdapter
>>> from z3c.table import column
>>> from z3c.table import interfaces
>>> provideAdapter(column.NameColumn,
...     (None, None, interfaces.ITable), provides=interfaces.IColumn,
...      name='secondColumn')

Initializing rows definitions for the empty table initializes the columns attribute list.

>>> simpleTable.columns
>>> simpleTable.initColumns()
>>> simpleTable.columns
[<NameColumn u'secondColumn'>]

Rendering the empty table now return the string:

>>> print simpleTable.render()
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Name</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
  </tbody>
</table>

Let’s see if the addColumn raises a ValueError if there is no Column class:

>>> column.addColumn(simpleTable, column.Column, u'dummy')
<Column u'dummy'>
>>> column.addColumn(simpleTable, None, u'dummy')
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
ValueError: class_ None must implement IColumn.

Test if we can set additional kws in addColumn:

>>> simpleColumn = column.addColumn(simpleTable, column.Column, u'dummy',
...     foo='foo value', bar=u'something else', counter=99)
>>> simpleColumn.foo
'foo value'
>>> simpleColumn.bar
u'something else'
>>> simpleColumn.counter
99

The NoneCell class provides some methods which never get called. But these are defined in the interface. Let’s test the default values and make coverage report happy.

Let’s get an container item first:

>>> from z3c.table.testing import Content
>>> firstItem = Content('First', 1)
>>> noneCellColumn = column.addColumn(simpleTable, column.NoneCell, u'none')
>>> noneCellColumn.renderCell(firstItem)
u''
>>> noneCellColumn.getColspan(firstItem)
0
>>> noneCellColumn.renderHeadCell()
u''
>>> noneCellColumn.renderCell(firstItem)
u''

The default Column implementation raises an NotImplementedError if we do not override the renderCell method:

>>> defaultColumn = column.addColumn(simpleTable, column.Column, u'default')
>>> defaultColumn.renderCell(firstItem)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError: Subclass must implement renderCell

CHANGES

1.0.0 (2012-08-09)

  • Added sorting (cssClassSortedOn and getCSSSortClass) CSS options
  • Added cell highlight (getCSSHighlightClass) CSS option
  • Added GetItemColumn which gets the value by index/key access.

0.9.1 (2011-08-03)

  • Fixed SelectedItemColumn.update when just one item was selected

0.9.0 (2010-08-09)

  • Added EMailColumn which can be used to display mailto links.
  • Fixed the default BatchProvider not to lose table sorting query arguments from the generated links; now batching and sorting play with each other nicely.
  • Split single doctest file (README.txt) into different files

0.8.1 (2010-07-31)

  • Added translation for the link title in the column header of the sortable table.

0.8.0 (2009-12-29)

  • Added translation for LinkColumn.linkContent.
  • Added I18nGetAttrColumn which translates its content.

0.7.0 (2009-12-29)

  • Allow to initialze the column definitions without requiring an entire table update.
  • Fixed tests, so they no longer use zope.app.container (which was even not declared as test dependency).
  • Head cell contents are now translated.

0.6.1 (2009-02-22)

  • Be smart to not IPhysicallyLocatable objects if we lookup the __name__ value in columns.

0.6.0 (2008-11-12)

  • Bugfix: Allow to switch the sort order on the header link. This was blocked to descending after the first click
  • Bugfix: CheckBoxColumn, ensure that we allways use a list for compare selected items. It was possible that if only one item get selected we compared a string. If this string was a sub string of another existing item the other item get selected too.
  • Moved advanced batching implementation into z3c.batching
  • Implemented GetAttrFormatterColumn. This column can be used for simple value formatting columns.
  • Bad typo in columns.py: Renamed getLinkConent to getLinkContent
  • Bug: Changed return string in getLinkCSS. It was using css=”” instead of class=”” for CSS classes. Thanks to Dan for reporting this bugs.
  • Implemented SelectedItemColumn
  • Fix CheckBoxColumn, use always the correct selectedItems. Use always real selectedItems form the table
  • Fix RadioColumn, use always the correct selectedItem from the selectedItems list. Use always the first selectedItems form the tables selectedItems

0.5.0 (2008-04-13)

  • Initial Release.
Release History

Release History

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Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.6.1

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.6.0

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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0.5.0

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

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Download Files

Download Files

TODO: Brief introduction on what you do with files - including link to relevant help section.

File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
z3c.table-1.0.0.zip (73.0 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Aug 9, 2012

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