Skip to main content

Recipe for installing Python package distributions as eggs

Project description

The egg-installation recipe installes eggs into a buildout eggs directory. It also generates scripts in a buildout bin directory with egg paths baked into them.

To do

  • Some way to freeze the egg-versions used. This includes some way to record which versions were selected dynamially and then a way to require that the recorded versions be used in a later run.

Change History

1.0.0b5 (2007-02-08)

Feature Changes

  • Added support for the buildout newest option.

1.0.0b4 (2007-01-17)

Feature Changes

  • Added initialization and arguments options to the scripts recipe.
  • Added an eggs recipe that just installes eggs.
  • Advertized the scripts recipe for creating scripts.

1.0.0b3 (2006-12-04)

Feature Changes

  • Added a develop recipe for creating develop eggs.

    This is useful to:

    • Specify custom extension building options,
    • Specify a version of Python to use, and to
    • Cause develop eggs to be created after other parts.
  • The develop and build recipes now return the paths created, so that created eggs or egg links are removed when a part is removed (or changed).

1.0.0b2 (2006-10-16)

Updated to work with (not get a warning from) zc.buildout 1.0.0b10.

1.0.0b1

Updated to work with zc.buildout 1.0.0b3.

1.0.0a3

  • Extra path elements to be included in generated scripts can now be set via the extra-paths option.
  • No longer implicitly generate py_ scripts fo reach egg. There is now an interpreter option to generate a script that, when run without arguments, launches the Python interactive interpreter with the path set based on a parts eggs and extra paths. If this script is run with the name of a Python script and arguments, then the given script is run with the path set.
  • You can now specify explicit entry points. This is useful for use with packages that don’t declare their own entry points.
  • Added Windows support.
  • Now-longer implicitly generate “py_” scripts for each egg. You can now generate a script for launching a Python interpreter or for running scripts based on the eggs defined for an egg part.
  • You can now specify custom entry points for packages that don’t declare their entry points.
  • You can now specify extra-paths to be included in generated scripts.

1.0.0a2

Added a custom recipe for building custom eggs using custom distrutils build_ext arguments.

1.0.0a1

Initial public version

Detailed Documentation

Installation of distributions as eggs

The zc.recipe.egg:eggs recipe can be used to install various types if distutils distributions as eggs. It takes a number of options:

eggs
A list of eggs to install given as one or more setuptools requirement strings. Each string must be given on a separate line.
find-links
A list of URLs, files, or directories to search for distributions.
index

The URL of an index server, or almost any other valid URL. :)

If not specified, the Python Package Index, http://cheeseshop.python.org/pypi, is used. You can specify an alternate index with this option. If you use the links option and if the links point to the needed distributions, then the index can be anything and will be largely ignored. In the examples, here, we’ll just point to an empty directory on our link server. This will make our examples run a little bit faster.

python
The name of a section to get the Python executable from. If not specified, then the buildout python option is used. The Python executable is found in the executable option of the named section.

We have a link server that has a number of distributions:

>>> print get(link_server),
<html><body>
<a href="demo-0.1-py2.3.egg">demo-0.1-py2.3.egg</a><br>
<a href="demo-0.2-py2.3.egg">demo-0.2-py2.3.egg</a><br>
<a href="demo-0.3-py2.3.egg">demo-0.3-py2.3.egg</a><br>
<a href="demoneeded-1.0.zip">demoneeded-1.0.zip</a><br>
<a href="demoneeded-1.1.zip">demoneeded-1.1.zip</a><br>
<a href="extdemo-1.4.zip">extdemo-1.4.zip</a><br>
<a href="index/">index/</a><br>
<a href="other-1.0-py2.3.egg">other-1.0-py2.3.egg</a><br>
</body></html>

We have a sample buildout. Let’s update it’s configuration file to install the demo package.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg:eggs
... eggs = demo<0.3
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... """ % dict(server=link_server))

In this example, we limited ourselves to revisions before 0.3. We also specified where to find distributions using the find-links option.

Let’s run the buildout:

>>> import os
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Installing demo
zc.buildout.easy_install: Getting new distribution for demo<0.3
zc.buildout.easy_install: Got demo 0.2
zc.buildout.easy_install: Getting new distribution for demoneeded
zc.buildout.easy_install: Got demoneeded 1.1

Now, if we look at the buildout eggs directory:

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'eggs')
-  demo-0.2-py2.3.egg
-  demoneeded-1.1-py2.3.egg
-  setuptools-0.6-py2.3.egg
-  zc.buildout-1.0-py2.3.egg

We see that we got an egg for demo that met the requirement, as well as the egg for demoneeded, which demo requires. (We also see an egg link for the recipe in the develop-eggs directory. This egg link was actually created as part of the sample buildout setup. Normally, when using the recipe, you’ll get a regular egg installation.)

Script generation

The demo egg defined a script, but we didn’t get one installed:

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
-  buildout

If we want scripts provided by eggs to be installed, we should use the scripts recipe:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg:scripts
... eggs = demo<0.3
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo

Now we also see the script defined by the dmo script:

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
-  buildout
-  demo

The scripts recipe defines some additional options:

entry-points
A list of entry-point identifiers of the form name=module#attrs, name is a script name, module is a module name, and a attrs is a (possibly dotted) name of an object wihin the module. This option is useful when working with distributions that don’t declare entry points, such as distributions not written to work with setuptools.
scripts
Control which scripts are generated. The value should be a list of zero or more tokens. Each token is either a name, or a name followed by an ‘=’ and a new name. Only the named scripts are generated. If no tokens are given, then script generation is disabled. If the option isn’t given at all, then all scripts defined by the named eggs will be generated.
interpreter
The name of a script to generate that allows access to a Python interpreter that has the path set based on the eggs installed.
extra-paths
Extra paths to include in a generates script.
initialization
Specify some Python initialization code. This is very limited. In particular, be aware that leading whitespace is stripped from the code given.
arguments
Specify some arguments to be passed to entry points as Python source.

Let’s add an interpreter option:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... eggs = demo<0.3
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... interpreter = py-demo
... """ % dict(server=link_server))

Note that we ommitted the entry point name from the recipe specification. We were able to do this because the scripts recipe if the default entry point for the zc.recipe.egg egg.

>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo

Now we also get a py-demo script for giving us a Python prompt with the path for demo and any eggs it depends on included in sys.path. This is useful for debugging and testing.

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
-  buildout
-  demo
-  py-demo

If we run the demo script, it prints out some minimal data:

>>> print system(join(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'demo')),
2 1

The value it prints out happens to be some values defined in the modules installed.

We can also run the py-demo script. Here we’ll just print out the bits if the path added to reflect the eggs:

>>> print system(join(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'py-demo'),
... """import os, sys
... for p in sys.path:
...     if 'demo' in p:
...         print os.path.basename(p)
...
... """).replace('>>> ', '').replace('... ', ''),
... # doctest: +ELLIPSIS +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
demo-0.2-py2.4.egg
demoneeded-1.1-py2.4.egg

Egg updating

The recipe normally gets the most recent distribution that satisfies the specification. It won’t do this is the buildout is either in non-newest mode or in offline mode. To see how this works, we’ll remove the restriction on demo:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... """ % dict(server=link_server))

and run the buildout in non-newest mode:

>>> print system(buildout+' -N'),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo

Note that we removed the eggs option, and the eggs defaulted to the part name. Because we removed the eggs option, the demo was reinstalled.

We’ll also run the buildout in off-line mode:

>>> print system(buildout+' -o'),
buildout: Updating demo

We didn’t get an update for demo:

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'eggs')
-  demo-0.2-py2.3.egg
-  demoneeded-1.1-py2.3.egg
-  setuptools-0.6-py2.3.egg
-  zc.buildout-1.0-py2.3.egg

If we run the buildout on the default online and newest modes, we’ll get an update for demo:

>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Updating demo
zc.buildout.easy_install: Getting new distribution for demo
zc.buildout.easy_install: Got demo 0.3

Then we’ll get a new demo egg:

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'eggs')
-  demo-0.2-py2.3.egg
-  demo-0.3-py2.3.egg
-  demoneeded-1.1-py2.3.egg
-  setuptools-0.6-py2.4.egg
-  zc.buildout-1.0-py2.4.egg

The script is updated too:

>>> print system(join(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'demo')),
3 1

Controlling script generation

You can control which scripts get generated using the scripts option. For example, to suppress scripts, use the scripts option without any arguments:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... scripts =
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
-  buildout

You can also control the name used for scripts:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... scripts = demo=foo
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
-  buildout
-  foo

Specifying extra script paths

If we need to include extra paths in a script, we can use the extra-paths option:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... scripts = demo=foo
... extra-paths =
...    /foo/bar
...    /spam/eggs
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo

Let’s look at the script that was generated:

>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'foo') # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
#!/usr/local/bin/python2.4
<BLANKLINE>
import sys
sys.path[0:0] = [
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demo-0.3-py2.4.egg',
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demoneeded-1.1-py2.4.egg',
  '/foo/bar',
  '/spam/eggs',
  ]
<BLANKLINE>
import eggrecipedemo
<BLANKLINE>
if __name__ == '__main__':
    eggrecipedemo.main()

Specifying initialialization code and arguments

Sometimes, we ned to do more than just calling entry points. We can use the initialialization and arguments options to specify extra code to be included in generated scripts:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... scripts = demo=foo
... extra-paths =
...    /foo/bar
...    /spam/eggs
... initialization = a = (1, 2
...                       3, 4)
... arguments = a, 2
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'foo') # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
#!/usr/local/bin/python2.4
<BLANKLINE>
import sys
sys.path[0:0] = [
  '/tmp/tmpmypJLx/_TEST_/sample-buildout/eggs/demo-0.3-py2.4.egg',
  '/tmp/tmpmypJLx/_TEST_/sample-buildout/eggs/demoneeded-1.1-py2.4.egg',
  '/foo/bar',
  '/spam/eggs',
  ]
<BLANKLINE>
a = (1, 2
3, 4)
<BLANKLINE>
import eggrecipedemo
<BLANKLINE>
if __name__ == '__main__':
    eggrecipedemo.main(a, 2)

Here we see that the initialization code we specified was added after setting the path. Note, as mentioennd above, that leading whitespace has been stripped. Similarly, the argument code we specified was added in the entry point call (to main).

Specifying entry points

Scripts can be generated for entry points declared explicitly. We can declare entry points using the entry-points option:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... extra-paths =
...    /foo/bar
...    /spam/eggs
... entry-points = alt=eggrecipedemo:alt other=foo.bar:a.b.c
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
-  alt
-  buildout
-  demo
-  other
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'other')
#!/usr/local/bin/python2.4
<BLANKLINE>
import sys
sys.path[0:0] = [
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demo-0.3-py2.4.egg',
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demoneeded-1.1-py2.4.egg',
  '/foo/bar',
  '/spam/eggs',
  ]
<BLANKLINE>
import foo.bar
<BLANKLINE>
if __name__ == '__main__':
    foo.bar.a.b.c()

Offline mode

If the buildout offline option is set to “true”, then no attempt will be made to contact an index server:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
... offline = true
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... index = eek!
... scripts = demo=foo
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Uninstalling demo
buildout: Installing demo

Controlling which Python to use

The following assumes that you have Python 2.3 installed.

We can specify the python to use by specifying the name of a section to read the Python executable from. The default is the section defined by the python buildout option.

We have a link server:

>>> print get(link_server),
<html><body>
<a href="demo-0.1-py2.3.egg">demo-0.1-py2.3.egg</a><br>
<a href="demo-0.2-py2.3.egg">demo-0.2-py2.3.egg</a><br>
<a href="demo-0.3-py2.3.egg">demo-0.3-py2.3.egg</a><br>
<a href="demoneeded-1.0.zip">demoneeded-1.0.zip</a><br>
<a href="demoneeded-1.1.zip">demoneeded-1.1.zip</a><br>
<a href="extdemo-1.4.zip">extdemo-1.4.zip</a><br>
<a href="index/">index/</a><br>
<a href="other-1.0-py2.3.egg">other-1.0-py2.3.egg</a><br>
</body></html>

We have a sample buildout. Let’s update it’s configuration file to install the demo package using Python 2.3.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = demo
... eggs-directory = eggs
... index = http://www.python.org/pypi/
...
... [python2.3]
... executable = %(python23)s
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... eggs = demo <0.3
... find-links = %(server)s
... python = python2.3
... interpreter = py-demo
... """ % dict(server=link_server, python23=python2_3_executable))

Now, if we run the buildout:

>>> import os
>>> os.chdir(sample_buildout)
>>> buildout = os.path.join(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'buildout')
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Installing demo
zc.buildout.easy_install: Getting new distribution for demo<0.3
zc.buildout.easy_install: Got demo 0.2
zc.buildout.easy_install: Getting new distribution for demoneeded
zc.buildout.easy_install: Getting new distribution for setuptools
zc.buildout.easy_install: Got setuptools 0.6
zc.buildout.easy_install: Got demoneeded 1.1

we’ll get the Python 2.3 eggs for demo and demoneeded:

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'eggs')
-  demo-0.2-py2.3.egg
-  demoneeded-1.1-py2.3.egg
d  setuptools-0.6-py2.3.egg
d  setuptools-0.6-py2.4.egg
-  zc.buildout-1.0-py2.4.egg

And the generated scripts invoke Python 2.3:

>>> import sys
>>> if sys.platform == 'win32':
...    script_name = 'demo-script.py'
... else:
...    script_name = 'demo'
>>> f = open(os.path.join(sample_buildout, 'bin', script_name))
>>> f.readline().strip() == '#!' + python2_3_executable
True
>>> print f.read(), # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
<BLANKLINE>
import sys
sys.path[0:0] = [
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demo-0.2-py2.3.egg',
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demoneeded-1.1-py2.3.egg',
  ]
<BLANKLINE>
import eggrecipedemo
<BLANKLINE>
if __name__ == '__main__':
    eggrecipedemo.main()
>>> if sys.platform == 'win32':
...     f = open(os.path.join(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'py-demo-script.py'))
... else:
...     f = open(os.path.join(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'py-demo'))
>>> f.readline().strip() == '#!' + python2_3_executable
True
>>> print f.read(), # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
import sys
<BLANKLINE>
sys.path[0:0] = [
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demo-0.2-py2.3.egg',
  '/sample-buildout/eggs/demoneeded-1.1-py2.3.egg',
  ]
<BLANKLINE>
_interactive = True
if len(sys.argv) > 1:
    import getopt
    _options, _args = getopt.getopt(sys.argv[1:], 'ic:')
    _interactive = False
    for (_opt, _val) in _options:
        if _opt == '-i':
            _interactive = True
        elif _opt == '-c':
            exec _val
<BLANKLINE>
    if _args:
        sys.argv[:] = _args
        execfile(sys.argv[0])
<BLANKLINE>
if _interactive:
    import code
    code.interact(banner="", local=globals())
>>> f.close()

Creating eggs with extensions neededing custom build settings

Sometimes, It’s necessary to provide extra control over how an egg is created. This is commonly true for eggs with extension modules that need to access libraries or include files.

The zc.recipe.egg:custom recipe can be used to define an egg with custom build parameters. The currently defined parameters are:

include-dirs
A new-line separated list of directories to search for include files.
library-dirs
A new-line separated list of directories to search for libraries to link with.
rpath
A new-line separated list of directories to search for dynamic libraries at run time.
define
A comma-separated list of names of C preprocessor variables to define.
undef
A comman separated list of names of C preprocessor variables to undefine.
libraries
The name of an additional library to link with. Due to limitations in distutils and desprite the option name, only a single library can be specified.
link-objects
The name of an link object to link afainst. Due to limitations in distutils and desprite the option name, only a single link object can be specified.
debug
Compile/link with debugging information
force
Forcibly build everything (ignore file timestamps)
compiler
Specify the compiler type
swig
The path to the swig executable
swig-cpp
Make SWIG create C++ files (default is C)
swig-opts
List of SWIG command line options

In addition, the following options can be used to specify the egg:

egg
An eggs to install given as a setuptools requirement string. This defaults to the part name.
find-links
A list of URLs, files, or directories to search for distributions.
index

The URL of an index server, or almost any other valid URL. :)

If not specified, the Python Package Index, http://cheeseshop.python.org/pypi, is used. You can specify an alternate index with this option. If you use the links option and if the links point to the needed distributions, then the index can be anything and will be largely ignored. In the examples, here, we’ll just point to an empty directory on our link server. This will make our examples run a little bit faster.

python
The name of a section to get the Python executable from. If not specified, then the buildout python option is used. The Python executable is found in the executable option of the named section.

To illustrate this, we’ll define a buildout that builds an egg for a package that has a simple extension module:

#include <Python.h>
#include <extdemo.h>

static PyMethodDef methods[] = {};

PyMODINIT_FUNC
initextdemo(void)
{
    PyObject *m;
    m = Py_InitModule3("extdemo", methods, "");
#ifdef TWO
    PyModule_AddObject(m, "val", PyInt_FromLong(2));
#else
    PyModule_AddObject(m, "val", PyInt_FromLong(EXTDEMO));
#endif
}

The extension depends on a system-dependnt include file, extdemo.h, that defines a constant, EXTDEMO, that is exposed by the extension.

The extension module is available as a source distribution, extdemo-1.4.tar.gz, on a distribution server.

We have a sample buildout that we’ll add an include directory to with the necessary include file:

>>> mkdir('include')
>>> write('include', 'extdemo.h',
... """
... #define EXTDEMO 42
... """)

We’ll also update the buildout configuration file to define a part for the egg:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = extdemo
...
... [extdemo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg:custom
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... include-dirs = include
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Installing extdemo
zip_safe flag not set; analyzing archive contents...

We got the zip_safe warning because the source distribution we used wasn’t setuptools based and thus didn’t set the option.

The egg is created in the develop-eggs directory not the eggs directory because it depends on buildout-specific parameters and the eggs directory can be shared across multiple buildouts.

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'develop-eggs')
d  extdemo-1.4-py2.4-unix-i686.egg
-  zc.recipe.egg.egg-link

Note that no scripts or dependencies are installed. To install dependencies or scripts for a custom egg, define another part and use the zc.recipe.egg recipe, listing the custom egg as one of the eggs to be installed. The zc.recipe.egg recipe will use the installed egg.

Let’s define a script that uses out ext demo:

>>> mkdir('demo')
>>> write('demo', 'demo.py',
... """
... import extdemo
... def main():
...     print extdemo.val
... """)
>>> write('demo', 'setup.py',
... """
... from setuptools import setup
... setup(name='demo')
... """)
>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... develop = demo
... parts = extdemo demo
...
... [extdemo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg:custom
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... include-dirs = include
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... eggs = demo
...        extdemo
... entry-points = demo=demo:main
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Develop: /sample-buildout/demo
buildout: Updating extdemo
buildout: Installing demo

When we run the script, we’ll 42 printed:

>>> print system(join('bin', 'demo')),
42

Updating

The custom recipe will normally check for new source distributions that meet the given specification. This can be suppressed using the buildout non-newest and offline modes. We’ll generate a new source distribution for extdemo:

>>> update_extdemo()

If we run the buildout in non-newest or offline modes:

>>> print system(buildout+' -N'),
buildout: Develop: /sample-buildout/demo
buildout: Updating extdemo
buildout: Updating demo
>>> print system(buildout+' -o'),
buildout: Develop: /sample-buildout/demo
buildout: Updating extdemo
buildout: Updating demo

We won’t get an update.

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'develop-eggs')
-  demo.egg-link
d  extdemo-1.4-py2.4-unix-i686.egg
-  zc.recipe.egg.egg-link

But if we run the buildout in the default on-line and newest modes, we will:

>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Develop: /sample-buildout/demo
buildout: Updating extdemo
zip_safe flag not set; analyzing archive contents...
buildout: Updating demo
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'develop-eggs')
-  demo.egg-link
d  extdemo-1.4-py2.4-linux-i686.egg
d  extdemo-1.5-py2.4-linux-i686.egg
-  zc.recipe.egg.egg-link

Controlling develop-egg generation

If you want to provide custom build options for a develop egg, you can use the develop recipe. The recipe has the following options:

path
The path to a setup script or directory containing a startup script. This is required.
include-dirs
A new-line separated list of directories to search for include files.
library-dirs
A new-line separated list of directories to search for libraries to link with.
rpath
A new-line separated list of directories to search for dynamic libraries at run time.
define
A comma-separated list of names of C preprocessor variables to define.
undef
A comman separated list of names of C preprocessor variables to undefine.
libraries
The name of an additional library to link with. Due to limitations in distutils and desprite the option name, only a single library can be specified.
link-objects
The name of an link object to link afainst. Due to limitations in distutils and desprite the option name, only a single link object can be specified.
debug
Compile/link with debugging information
force
Forcibly build everything (ignore file timestamps)
compiler
Specify the compiler type
swig
The path to the swig executable
swig-cpp
Make SWIG create C++ files (default is C)
swig-opts
List of SWIG command line options
python
The name of a section to get the Python executable from. If not specified, then the buildout python option is used. The Python executable is found in the executable option of the named section.

To illustrate this, we’ll use a directory containing the extdemo example from the earlier section:

>>> ls(extdemo)
-  MANIFEST
-  MANIFEST.in
-  README
-  extdemo.c
-  setup.py
>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... develop = demo
... parts = extdemo demo
...
... [extdemo]
... setup = %(extdemo)s
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg:develop
... include-dirs = include
... define = TWO
...
... [demo]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... eggs = demo
...        extdemo
... entry-points = demo=demo:main
... """ % dict(extdemo=extdemo))

Note that we added a define option to cause the preprocessor variable TWO to be defined. This will cause the module-variable, ‘val’, to be set with a value of 2.

>>> print system(buildout),
buildout: Develop: /sample-buildout/demo
buildout: Uninstalling extdemo
buildout: Installing extdemo
buildout: Updating demo

Our develop-eggs now includes an egg link for extdemo:

>>> ls('develop-eggs')
-  demo.egg-link
-  extdemo.egg-link
-  zc.recipe.egg.egg-link

and the extdemo now has a built extension:

>>> ls(extdemo)
-  MANIFEST
-  MANIFEST.in
-  README
d  build
-  extdemo.c
d  extdemo.egg-info
-  extdemo.so
-  setup.py

Because develop eggs take precedence over non-develop eggs, the demo script will use the new develop egg:

>>> print system(join('bin', 'demo')),
2

Egg Recipe API for other Recipes

It is common for recipes to accept a collection of egg specifications and generate scripts based on the resulting working sets. The egg recipe provides an API that other recipes can use.

A recipe can reuse the egg recipe, supporting the eggs, find-links, index, extra-paths, and python options. This is done by creating an egg recipe instance in a recipes’s contructor. In the recipe’s install script, the egg-recipe instance’s working_set method is used to collect the requested eggs and working set.

To illustrate, we create a sample recipe that is a very thin layer around the egg recipe:

>>> mkdir(sample_buildout, 'sample')
>>> write(sample_buildout, 'sample', 'sample.py',
... """
... import logging, os
... import zc.recipe.egg
...
... class Sample:
...
...     def __init__(self, buildout, name, options):
...         self.egg = zc.recipe.egg.Scripts(buildout, name, options)
...         self.name = name
...         self.options = options
...
...     def install(self):
...         extras = self.options['extras'].split()
...         requirements, ws = self.egg.working_set(extras)
...         print 'Part:', self.name
...         print 'Egg requirements:'
...         for r in requirements:
...             print r
...         print 'Working set:'
...         for d in ws:
...             print d
...         print 'extra paths:', self.egg.extra_paths
...         return ()
...
...     update = install
... """)

Here we instantiated the egg recipe in the constructor, saving it in an attribute. This also initialized the options dictionary.

In our install method, we called the working_set method on the instance we saved. The working_set method takes an optional sequence of extra requirements to be included in the working set.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'sample', 'setup.py',
... """
... from setuptools import setup
...
... setup(
...     name = "sample",
...     entry_points = {'zc.buildout': ['default = sample:Sample']},
...     install_requires = 'zc.recipe.egg',
...     )
... """)
>>> write(sample_buildout, 'sample', 'README.txt', " ")
>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... develop = sample
... parts = sample-part
...
... [sample-part]
... recipe = sample
... eggs = demo<0.3
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)sindex
... extras = other
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> import os
>>> os.chdir(sample_buildout)
>>> buildout = os.path.join(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'buildout')
>>> print system(buildout + ' -q'),
Part: sample-part
Egg requirements:
demo<0.3
Working set:
demo 0.2
other 1.0
demoneeded 1.1
extra paths: []

We can see that the options were augmented with additionl data computed by the egg recipe by looking at .installed.cfg:

>>> cat(sample_buildout, '.installed.cfg')
[buildout]
installed_develop_eggs = /sample-buildout/develop-eggs/sample.egg-link
parts = sample-part
<BLANKLINE>
[sample-part]
__buildout_installed__ =
__buildout_signature__ = sample-6aWMvV2EJ9Ijq+bR8ugArQ==
        zc.recipe.egg-cAsnudgkduAa/Fd+WJIM6Q==
        setuptools-0.6-py2.4.egg
        zc.buildout-+rYeCcmFuD1K/aB77XTj5A==
_b = /sample-buildout/bin
_d = /sample-buildout/develop-eggs
_e = /sample-buildout/eggs
bin-directory = /sample-buildout/bin
develop-eggs-directory = /sample-buildout/develop-eggs
eggs = demo<0.3
eggs-directory = /sample-buildout/eggs
executable = /usr/local/bin/python2.3
extras = other
find-links = http://localhost:27071/
index = http://localhost:27071/index
recipe = sample

If we use the extra-paths option:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... develop = sample
... parts = sample-part
...
... [sample-part]
... recipe = sample
... eggs = demo<0.3
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)sindex
... extras = other
... extra-paths = /foo/bar
...               /spam/eggs
... """ % dict(server=link_server))

Then we’ll see that reflected in the extra_paths attribute in the egg recipe instance:

>>> print system(buildout + ' -q'),
Part: sample-part
Egg requirements:
demo<0.3
Working set:
demo 0.2
other 1.0
demoneeded 1.1
extra paths: ['/foo/bar', '/spam/eggs']

Download files

Download the file for your platform. If you're not sure which to choose, learn more about installing packages.

Files for zc.recipe.egg, version 1.0.0b5
Filename, size File type Python version Upload date Hashes
Filename, size zc.recipe.egg-1.0.0b5-py2.3.egg (107.6 kB) File type Egg Python version 2.3 Upload date Hashes View
Filename, size zc.recipe.egg-1.0.0b5-py2.4.egg (30.5 kB) File type Egg Python version 2.4 Upload date Hashes View
Filename, size zc.recipe.egg-1.0.0b5-py2.5.egg (30.5 kB) File type Egg Python version 2.5 Upload date Hashes View

Supported by

AWS AWS Cloud computing Datadog Datadog Monitoring DigiCert DigiCert EV certificate Facebook / Instagram Facebook / Instagram PSF Sponsor Fastly Fastly CDN Google Google Object Storage and Download Analytics Pingdom Pingdom Monitoring Salesforce Salesforce PSF Sponsor Sentry Sentry Error logging StatusPage StatusPage Status page