This is a pre-production deployment of Warehouse, however changes made here WILL affect the production instance of PyPI.
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Project Description

This application measures and compares the performance of various ZODB storages and configurations. It is derived from the RelStorage speedtest script, but this version allows arbitrary storage types and configurations, provides more measurements, and produces numbers that are easier to interpret.

Although you can easy_install this package, the best way to get started is to follow the directions below to set up a complete testing environment with sample tests.

Known Issues

This application seems to freeze with Python versions before 2.6, most likely due to some issue connected with the backported version of the multiprocessing module. Assistance in finding a resolution would be greatly appreciated.

Installing zodbshootout using Buildout

First, be sure you have certain packages installed so you can compile software. Ubuntu and Debian users should do this (tested with Ubuntu 8.04, Ubuntu 9.10, Debian Etch, and Debian Lenny):

$ sudo apt-get install build-essential python-dev
$ sudo apt-get install ncurses-dev libevent-dev libreadline-dev zlib1g-dev

Download the zodbshootout tar file. Unpack it and change to its top level directory:

$ tar xvzf zodbshootout-*.tar.gz
$ cd zodbshootout-*

Set up that same directory as a partly isolated Python environment using virtualenv:

$ virtualenv --no-site-packages .

Install Buildout in that environment. (This command will create a script named bin/buildout.):

$ bin/easy_install zc.buildout

Make sure you have adequate space in your temporary directory (normally /tmp) to compile MySQL and PostgreSQL. You may want to switch to a different temporary directory by setting the TMPDIR environment variable:

$ TMPDIR=/var/tmp
$ export TMPDIR

Run Buildout. Buildout will follow the instructions specified by buildout.cfg to download, compile, and initialize versions of MySQL and PostgreSQL. It will also install several other Python packages. This may take a half hour or more the first time:

$ bin/buildout

If that command fails, first check for missing dependencies. The dependencies are listed above. To retry, just run bin/buildout again.

Once Buildout completes successfully, start the test environment using Supervisord:

$ bin/supervisord

Confirm that Supervisor started all processes:

$ bin/supervisorctl status

If all processes are running, the test environment is now ready. Run a sample test:

$ bin/zodbshootout etc/sample.conf

The sample.conf test compares the performance of RelStorage with MySQL and PostgreSQL, along with FileStorage behind ZEO, where the client and server are located on the same computer.

See also remote-sample.conf, which tests database speed over a network link. Set up remote-sample.conf by building zodbshootout on two networked computers, then point the client at the server by changing the %define host line at the top of remote-sample.conf. The etc directory contains other sample database configurations.

Running zodbshootout

The zodbshootout script accepts the name of a database configuration file. The configuration file contains a list of databases to test, in ZConfig format. The script deletes all data from each of the databases, then writes and reads the databases while taking measurements. Finally, the script produces a tabular summary of objects written or read per second in each configuration. zodbshootout uses the names of the databases defined in the configuration file as the table column names.

Warning: Again, zodbshootout deletes all data from all databases specified in the configuration file. Do not configure it to open production databases!

The zodbshootout script accepts the following options.

  • -n (--object-counts) specifies how many persistent objects to write or read per transaction. The default is 1000. An interesting value to use is 1, causing the test to primarily measure the speed of opening connections and committing transactions.
  • -c (--concurrency) specifies how many tests to run in parallel. The default is 2. Each of the concurrent tests runs in a separate process to prevent contention over the CPython global interpreter lock. In single-host configurations, the performance measurements should increase with the concurrency level, up to the number of CPU cores in the computer. In more complex configurations, performance will be limited by other factors such as network latency.
  • -p (--profile) enables the Python profiler while running the tests and outputs a profile for each test in the specified directory. Note that the profiler typically reduces the database speed by a lot. This option is intended to help developers isolate performance bottlenecks.

You should write a configuration file that models your intended database and network configuration. Running zodbshootout may reveal configuration optimizations that would significantly increase your application’s performance.

Interpreting the Results

The table below shows typical output of running zodbshootout with etc/sample.conf on a dual core, 2.1 GHz laptop:

"Transaction",                postgresql, mysql,   mysql_mc, zeo_fs
"Add 1000 Objects",                 6529,   10027,     9248,    5212
"Update 1000 Objects",              6754,    9012,     8064,    4393
"Read 1000 Warm Objects",           4969,    6147,    21683,    1960
"Read 1000 Cold Objects",           5041,   10554,     5095,    1920
"Read 1000 Hot Objects",           38132,   37286,    37826,   37723
"Read 1000 Steamin' Objects",    4591465, 4366792,  3339414, 4534382

zodbshootout runs six kinds of tests for each database. For each test, zodbshootout instructs all processes to perform similar transactions concurrently, computes the average duration of the concurrent transactions, takes the fastest timing of three test runs, and derives how many objects per second the database is capable of writing or reading under the given conditions.

zodbshootout runs these tests:

  • Add objects

    zodbshootout begins a transaction, adds the specified number of persistent objects to a PersistentMapping, and commits the transaction. In the sample output above, MySQL was able to add 10027 objects per second to the database, almost twice as fast as ZEO, which was limited to 5212 objects per second. Also, with memcached support enabled, MySQL write performance took a small hit due to the time spent storing objects in memcached.

  • Update objects

    In the same process, without clearing any caches, zodbshootout makes a simple change to each of the objects just added and commits the transaction. The sample output above shows that MySQL and ZEO typically take a little longer to update objects than to add new objects, while PostgreSQL is faster at updating objects in this case. The sample tests only history-preserving databases; you may see different results with history-free databases.

  • Read warm objects

    In a different process, without clearing any caches, zodbshootout reads all of the objects just added. This test favors databases that use either a persistent cache or a cache shared by multiple processes (such as memcached). In the sample output above, this test with MySQL and memcached runs more than ten times faster than ZEO without a persistent cache. (See fs-sample.conf for a test configuration that includes a ZEO persistent cache.)

  • Read cold objects

    In the same process as was used for reading warm objects, zodbshootout clears all ZODB caches (the pickle cache, the ZEO cache, and/or memcached) then reads all of the objects written by the update test. This test favors databases that read objects quickly, independently of caching. The sample output above shows that cold read time is currently a significant ZEO weakness.

  • Read hot objects

    In the same process as was used for reading cold objects, zodbshootout clears the in-memory ZODB caches (the pickle cache), but leaves the other caches intact, then reads all of the objects written by the update test. This test favors databases that have a process-specific cache. In the sample output above, all of the databases have that type of cache.

  • Read steamin’ objects

    In the same process as was used for reading hot objects, zodbshootout once again reads all of the objects written by the update test. This test favors databases that take advantage of the ZODB pickle cache. As can be seen from the sample output above, accessing an object from the ZODB pickle cache is around 100 times faster than any operation that requires network access or unpickling.

Release History

Release History

0.5

This version

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0.2

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0.1

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Download Files

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File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
zodbshootout-0.5.tar.gz (15.5 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Sep 8, 2012

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