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Asyncio utilities

Project description

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Asyncio utilities for python >= 3.6

A small package of utilities that mimics some builtin methods, but in an asynchronous fashion.

  • Free software: MIT license

Features

  • Asyncio utilities

Install

To install:

pip install asyncio-utils

Usage

Almost everything is used with the await keyword before unless marked otherwise. However most of the method inputs can be awaitable (but not actually awaited yet) and they will still work, unless marked otherwise.

To run any of the examples:

import asyncio
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()

aiter

Wraps/ensures an AsyncIterator.

If the input is Awaitable, then we will await the result, and check if it returns and AsyncIterator.

If the input is an async generator that was not called, then we will call it and yield it’s values.

Else if the input is an iterator we iterate it and yield the values.

Examples:

>>> async def main():
    async for v in aiter2(range(1, 5)):  # normal iterator
        print(v)

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
1
2
3
4

>>> async def main():
        async for v in aiter2(arange(1, 5)):  # not awaited
            print(v)

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
1
2
3
4

>>> async def main():
        async for v in aiter2(await arange(1, 5)):  # awaited works
            print(v)

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
1
2
3
4

>>> async def agen():
        yield 1
        yield 2
        yield 3
        yield 4

>>> async def main():
        async for v in aiter2(agen):  # oops forgot to call it
            print(v)

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
1
2
3
4

anext

Mimics the builtin next method. This method will not accept an awaitable. The input must be an AsyncIterator or you will get a TypeError.

Example:

>>> async def main():
    myrange = await arange(1, 5)
    for n in range(1, 5):
        print(n, n == await anext(myrange))
    try:
        n = await anext(myrange)
        print("This should not be shown")
    except StopAsyncIteration:
        print('Sorry no more values!')

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
1 True
2 True
3 True
4 True
Sorry no more values!

Example of using a default value if a StopAsyncIteration has occured:

>>> async def main():
    myrange = await arange(1)
    print(await anext(myrange))
    print(await anext(myrange, 'Sorry no more values!'))
    # or as kwarg
    print(await anext(myrange, default='Still no more values!'))

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
1
Sorry no more values!
Still no more values!

Example failure because a non AsyncIterator passed in:

>>> async def main():
        val = await anext(arange(1, 5))
        print(val)  # never get here

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
TypeError: Not an AsyncIterator: <coroutine object arange at 0x1068170f8>

amap

AsyncGenerator that mimics the builtin map method.

Note

You do not use await on AsyncGenerator’s

Example:

>>> async def main():
        async for val in amap('${}'.format, arange(1, 5)):
            print(val)

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
$1
$2
$3
$4

This also works if the function passed in is a coroutine:

>>> async def formatter(val):
        return f'${val}'

>>> async def main():
        async for val in amap(formatter, arange(1, 5)):
            print(val)

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
$1
$2
$3
$4

afilter

An async generator that mimics the builtin filter method.

Example:

>>> async def main():
        myfilter = await afilter(lambda x: x == 2, arange(1, 5))
        print(await anext(myfilter, 'Oops no more twos'))
        print(await anext(myfilter, 'Oops no more twos'))

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
2
Oops no more twos

arange

Mimics the builtin range method. Returning an AsyncIterator.

Example:

>>> async def main():
        myrange = await arange(1, 5)
        async for n in myrange:
            print(n)

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
1
2
3
4

alist

Transform an AsyncIterator to a list. This would be equivalent to:

[v async for v in async_iterator]

However we ensure that the async_iterator is actually an AsyncIterator.

Example:

>>> async def main():
        print(await alist(arange(1, 5)))
        # or
        print(await alist(await arange(1, 5)))

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
[1, 2, 3, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4]

atuple

Transform an AsyncIterator to a tuple. This would be equivalent to:

tuple([v async for v in async_iterator])

However we ensure that the async_iterator is actually an AsyncIterator.

Example:

>>> async def main():
        print(await atuple(arange(1, 5)))
        # or
        print(await atuple(await arange(1, 5)))

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
(1, 2, 3, 4)
(1, 2, 3, 4)

aset

Transform an AsyncIterator to a set. This would be equivalent to:

{v async for v in async_iterator}

However we ensure that the async_iterator is actually an AsyncIterator.

Example:

>>> async def main():
        print(await aset(arange(1, 5)))
        # or
        print(await aset(await arange(1, 5)))

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
{1, 2, 3, 4}
{1, 2, 3, 4}

adict

Transform an AsyncIterator to a dict. This would be equivalent to:

{k: v async for (k, v) in async_iterator}

However we ensure that the async_iterator is actually an AsyncIterator.

Example:

>>> async def k_v_gen():
        async for n in await arange(1, 5):
            yield (n, n * 2)

>>> async def main():
        print(await adict(k_v_gen()))

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8}

transform_factory

This can be used to transform an AsyncIterator into any callable. This is the base for alist, aset, atuple, and adict. While not tested, in theory, you should be able to transform it into the output of any callable that takes a standard iterator.

Example of how the alist method is declared in the code:

>>> import functools
>>> alist = functools.partial(transform_factory, _type=list)
>>> alist.__doc__ = """Async list documentation."""

>>> async def main():
        print(await alist(arange(1, 5)))

>>> loop.run_until_complete(main())
[1, 2, 3, 4]

make_async

Make’s any callable awaitable. Can be used as a decorator.

Example:

>>> class AClass(object):

        def __init__(self):
            self.a = 'a'

>>> async_aclass = make(async_aclass)

# or as a decorator
>>> @make_async
    def sync_a():
        return 'a'

>>> async def main():
        async_a = await async_aclass()
        print(async_a.a == 'a')

        print(await sync_a())

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