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A library for parsing and evaluating dice notation

Project Description

A library and command line tool for parsing and evaluating dice notation.

Usage

From the command line, as a pip-installed entry point:

$ roll 3d6

or as a module:

$ python -m dice 3d6

The command line arguments are as follows:

-m --min        Make all rolls the lowest possible result
-M --max        Make all rolls the highest possible result
-h --help       Show this help text
-v --verbose    Show additional output
-V --version    Show the package version

If your expression begins with a dash (-), then put a double dash (--) before it to prevent docopt from trying to process it as a command option. Example: roll -- -10d6. Alternatively, use parenthesis: roll (-10d6).

Invoking from python:

import dice
dice.roll('3d6')

This returns an Element which is the result of the roll, which can be a list, int, or subclass thereof, depending on the top-level operator.

Notation

The expression works like a simple equation parser with some extra operators.

The following operators are listed in order of precedence. Parentheses may be used to force an alternate order of evaluation.

The dice ([N]dS) operator takes an amount (N) and a number of sides (S), and returns a list of N random numbers between 1 and S. For example: 4d6 may return [6, 3, 2, 4]. Usin a % as the second operand is shorthand for rolling a d100, and a using f is shorthand for ±1 fudge dice.

The fudge dice ([N]uS) operator is interchangable with the dice operator, but makes the dice’s range from -S to S instead of 1 to S. This includes 0.

A wild dice ([N]wS) roll is special. The last roll in this set is called the “wild die”. If this die’s roll is the maximum value, the second-highest roll in the set is set to the maximum value. If its roll is the minimum, then both it and the highest roll in the set aer set to zero. Then another die is rolled. If this roll is the minimum value again, then ALL die are set to zero.

If N is not specified, it is assumed you want to roll a single die. d6 is equivalent to 1d6.

Rolls can be exploded with the x operator, which adds an additional dice to the set for each roll above a given threshold. If a threshold isn’t given, it defaults to the maximum possible roll. If the extra dice exceed this threshold, they “explode” again! Safeguards are in place to prevent this from crashing the parser with infinite explosions.

You can make the parser reroll dice below a certain threshold with the r and rr operators. The single r variety allows the new roll to be below the threshold, whereas the double variety’s roll changes the roll range to have a minimum of the threshold. The threshold defaults to the minimum roll.

The highest, middle or lowest rolls or list entries can be selected with (^ or h), (m or o), or (v or l) respectively. 6d6^3 will keep the highest 3 rolls, whereas 6d6v3 will select the lowest 3 rolls. If a number isn’t specified, it defaults to keeping all but one for highest and lowest, and all but two for the middle.

There are two operators for taking a set of rolls or numbers and counting the number of elements at or above a certain threshold, or “successes”. Both require a right-hand operand for the threshold. The first, e, only counts successes. The second, f, counts successes minus failures, which are when a roll is the minimum possible value for the die element, or 1 for lists.

The +- operator is a special prefix for sets of rolls and lists. It negates odd roles within a list. Example: [1, 2, 3] -> [-1, 2, -3]. There is also the negate (-) operator, which works on either single elements, sets or rolls, or lists. There is also an identity + operator.

A list or set of rolls can be turned into an integer with the total (t) operator. 6d1t will return 6 instead of [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]. Applying integer operations to a list of rolls will total them automatically.

A set of dice rolls can be sorted with the sort (s) operator. 4d6s will not change the return value, but the dice will be sorted from lowest to highest.

Values can be added or subtracted from each element of a list or set of rolls with the pointwise add (.+) and subtract (.-) operators. For example: 4d1 .+ 3 will return [4, 4, 4, 4].

Basic integer operations are also available: 16 / 8 * 4 - 2 + 1 -> 9.

Finally, there are two operators for building and extending lists. To build a list, use a comma to seperate elements. If any comma-seperated item isn’t a scalar (e.g. a roll), it is flattened into one by taking its total. The extend operator (|) is used to merge two lists into one, or append single elements to the beginning or end of a list.

API

The calls to dice.roll() above may be replaced with dice.roll_min() or dice.roll_max() to force ALL rolls to their highest or lowest values respectively. This might be useful to see what the minumum and maximum possible values for a given expression are. Beware that this causes wild dice rolls to act like normal ones, and rolls performed as explosions are not forced high or low.

The roll() function and variants take a boolean raw parameter which makes the library return the element instead of the result. Note that the evaluate_cached method is called as part of roll(), which populates element.result. Calling element.evaluate() will not reset this value.

To display a verbose breakdown of the element tree, the dice.utilities.verbose_print(element) function is available. If element.result has not yet been populated, the function calls evaluate_cached() first. Keep this in mind if you want to print the result of an evaluation with custom arguments. verbose_print() returns a str.

Licence

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2013 Sam Clements, 2017 Caleb Johnson

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Release History

Release History

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2.0.0

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0.0.0

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