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YAML driven docker playbook

Project description

docker-playbook

YAML driven (nvidia) docker playbook

Requirements

  • Python3.x
  • Nvidia-docker2 (Make sure you can nvidia-smi and docker images)
  • PyYAML>=3.12 (both host and docker image)

Template Dockerfile is provided at the bottom, which is optional
though recommended because of its security enhancements and useful features.

Usage example

./playbook.py sample.yml

Features

  • Runs with nvidia-docker2 mostly in non-interactive mode (so if your script waits for input by accident, it gets signal and dies)
  • Runs (whitelisted) steps in sequential manner
  • Context deduction: each step can run in different docker images or host
  • Full access to host network services in non-interactive mode
  • Simple step function siginature step_blah(ctx) - easy to extend
  • Minimal command line arguments ./playbook.py some.yml is all you do
  • Single source file & low dependency (only PyYAML is not in standard library, replacable but strongly recommend)
  • Colorful logging for readability

How to add steps?

  1. Copy library.steps module from this repository to start developing your own library.steps module for this script to import.
  2. Add a function def step_something(ctx). Current execution context is in ctx as dict. Keys are proxied to attributes to save a lot of brakets and quotes. You may use logger to print info.
def step_something(ctx):
    logger.info(ctx.other_vars)
  1. Whitelist your step in library.steps.whitlist without the step_ prefix.
  2. Add an entry to your YAML file in steps where action is the step function name without prefix:
steps:
  - name: Some message here
    action: something
    other_vars: goes_to_ctx

Context deduction rules

docker overrides > step config > global config > parser defualts > context initialization

How to specify docker environment?

You may add a default docker environment. And use docker_overrides to change context variables when docker is in use.

docker:
  image: aleozlx/tkstack2:latest
  runtime: nvidia
  gui: False
  ports:
    - 6006:6006
  volumes:
    - /tmp:/workspace/build
    - /mnt/datasets:/workspace/datasets
  docker_overrides:
    storage: /workspace/datasets
steps:
  - name: Some message here
    action: something
    storage: /mnt/datasets

Or override the docker environment completely per step

docker:
  # ...
steps:
  - name: Some message here
    action: something
    storage: /mnt/datasets
    docker:
      image: aleozlx/tkstack2:latest
      runtime: nvidia
      volumes:
        - /tmp:/workspace/build
    docker_overrides:
        storage: /workspace/datasets

Or use the host

docker:
  # ...
steps:
  - name: Some message here
    action: something
    storage: /mnt/datasets
    docker: null

Note: When a docker environment is present, the playbook starts docker accordingly and resumes itself inside docker to reuse many of the playbooks' features, so that context deduction and logging have consistent behavior. (To do that, you code containing the playbook will have to be mounted read-only. This is automatic.) That's why PyYAML is also required inside your docker image. Consider you are keeping the full operationalizing mechanism with a silght dependency constraint.

Security assumptions (or gotchas)

Host file system: volumes specified in your playbook will be mounted RW. Although your code will be mounted RO automatically. Playbook assumes that you use a docker image that uses non-root user (like recommended) whose uid:gid hopefully maps to you on host system.

Network: network services inside docker are not isolated from host in non-interactive mode to provide convenient access to host databases etc. Playbook assumes whatever you are operationalizing is trusted and that your host should have a proper set of INPUT rules, and that services inside docker should be protected by an independent firewall if necessary.

X11: the recommended docker image does intend to provide isolated X11 access by creating non-root user that presumably maps to you on host and your X authentication files are natually mounted with proper permissions already in place. But the uid in that image is just a guess so on a host shared by many users, this is probably no good if it even works. (Docker image needs to be build in a better way)

Playbook itself: the playbook itself is obviously a very capable shell program. It has execute permission by default for convenience (not necessarily good idea). It is based on a simple whitelist to allow any actions to be executed. The docker shell provided shouldn't be able to be spawned on host. But all these are best-effort, no promises.

At the end of day, this is an under-2^7-line script that is supposed to just drive other things and make them work. Composition over inheritance principle makes things simpler and useful.

Template Dockerfile

https://gitlab-p01.cgi.missouri.edu/ExternalUsers/AlexYang_Fun/tkstack2/blob/master/src/Dockerfile

Features

License

Licensed under either of

at your option.

Project details


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