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LTTng analyses

Project Description
LTTng analyses
**************

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:target: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/lttnganalyses
:alt: Latest version released on PyPi

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:target: https://travis-ci.org/lttng/lttng-analyses
:alt: Status of Travis CI

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:target: https://ci.lttng.org/job/lttng-analyses_master_build
:alt: Status of LTTng CI

The **LTTng analyses** are a set of various executable analyses to
extract and visualize monitoring data and metrics from
`LTTng <http://lttng.org/>`_ kernel traces on the command line.

As opposed to other "live" diagnostic or monitoring solutions, this
approach is based on the following workflow:

#. Record your system's activity with LTTng, a low-overhead tracer.
#. Do whatever it takes for your problem to occur.
#. Diagnose your problem's cause **offline** (when tracing is stopped).

This solution allows you to target problems that are hard to find and
to "dig" until the root cause is found.

**Current limitations**:

- The LTTng analyses can be quite slow to execute. There are a number of
places where they could be optimized, but using the Python interpreter
seems to be an important impediment.

This project is regarded by its authors as a testing ground to
experiment analysis features, user interfaces, and usability in
general. It is not considered ready to analyze long traces.

**Contents**:

.. contents::
:local:
:depth: 3
:backlinks: none


Install LTTng analyses
======================

.. NOTE::

The version 2.0 of `Trace Compass <http://tracecompass.org/>`_
requires LTTng analyses 0.4: Trace Compass 2.0 is not compatible
with LTTng analyses 0.5 and after.

In this case, we suggest that you install LTTng analyses from the
``stable-0.4`` branch of the project's Git repository (see
`Install from the Git repository`_). You can also
`download <https://github.com/lttng/lttng-analyses/releases>`_ the
latest 0.4 release tarball and follow the
`Install from a release tarball`_ procedure.


Required dependencies
---------------------

- `Python <https://www.python.org/>`_ ≥ 3.4
- `setuptools <https://pypi.python.org/pypi/setuptools>`_
- `pyparsing <http://pyparsing.wikispaces.com/>`_ ≥ 2.0.0
- `Babeltrace <http://diamon.org/babeltrace/>`_ ≥ 1.2 with Python
bindings (``--enable-python-bindings`` when building from source)


Optional dependencies
---------------------

- `LTTng <http://lttng.org/>`_ ≥ 2.5: to use the
``lttng-analyses-record`` script and to trace the system in
general
- `termcolor <https://pypi.python.org/pypi/termcolor/>`_: color
support
- `progressbar <https://pypi.python.org/pypi/progressbar/>`_:
terminal progress bar support (this is not required for the
machine interface's progress indication feature)


Install from PyPI (online repository)
-------------------------------------

To install the latest LTTng analyses release on your system from
`PyPI <https://pypi.python.org/pypi/lttnganalyses>`_:

#. Install the required dependencies.
#. **Optional**: Install the optional dependencies.
#. Make sure ``pip`` for Python 3 is installed on your system. The
package is named ``python3-pip`` on most distributions
(``python-pip`` on Arch Linux).
#. Use ``pip3`` to install LTTng analyses:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo pip3 install --upgrade lttnganalyses

Note that you can also install LTTng analyses locally, only for
your user:

.. code-block:: bash

pip3 install --user --upgrade lttnganalyses

Files are installed in ``~/.local``, therefore ``~/.local/bin`` must
be part of your ``PATH`` environment variable for the LTTng analyses
to be launchable.


Install from a release tarball
------------------------------

To install a specific LTTng analyses release (tarball) on your system:

#. Install the required dependencies.
#. **Optional**: Install the optional dependencies.
#. `Download <https://github.com/lttng/lttng-analyses/releases>`_ and
extract the desired release tarball.
#. Use ``setup.py`` to install LTTng analyses:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo ./setup.py install


Install from the Git repository
-------------------------------

To install LTTng analyses from a specific branch or tag of the
project's Git repository:

#. Install the required dependencies.
#. **Optional**: Install the optional dependencies.
#. Make sure ``pip`` for Python 3 is installed on your system. The
package is named ``python3-pip`` on most distributions
(``python-pip`` on Arch Linux).
#. Use ``pip3`` to install LTTng analyses:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo pip3 install --upgrade git+git://github.com/lttng/lttng-analyses.git@master

Replace ``master`` with the desired branch or tag name to install
in the previous URL.

Note that you can also install LTTng analyses locally, only for
your user:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo pip3 install --user --upgrade git+git://github.com/lttng/lttng-analyses.git@master

Files are installed in ``~/.local``, therefore ``~/.local/bin`` must
be part of your ``PATH`` environment variable for the LTTng analyses
to be launchable.


Install on Ubuntu
-----------------

To install LTTng analyses on Ubuntu ≥ 12.04:

#. Add the *LTTng Latest Stable* PPA repository:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y software-properties-common
sudo apt-add-repository -y ppa:lttng/ppa
sudo apt-get update

Replace ``software-properties-common`` with
``python-software-properties`` on Ubuntu 12.04.
#. Install the required dependencies:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y babeltrace
sudo apt-get install -y python3-babeltrace
sudo apt-get install -y python3-setuptools

On Ubuntu > 12.04:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y python3-pyparsing

On Ubuntu 12.04:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo pip3 install --upgrade pyparsing
#. **Optional**: Install the optional dependencies:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y lttng-tools
sudo apt-get install -y lttng-modules-dkms
sudo apt-get install -y python3-progressbar
sudo apt-get install -y python3-termcolor
#. Install LTTng analyses:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y python3-lttnganalyses


Install on Debian "sid"
-----------------------

To install LTTng analyses on Debian "sid":

#. Install the required dependencies:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y babeltrace
sudo apt-get install -y python3-babeltrace
sudo apt-get install -y python3-setuptools
sudo apt-get install -y python3-pyparsing
#. **Optional**: Install the optional dependencies:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y lttng-tools
sudo apt-get install -y lttng-modules-dkms
sudo apt-get install -y python3-progressbar
sudo apt-get install -y python3-termcolor
#. Install LTTng analyses:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo apt-get install -y python3-lttnganalyses


Record a trace
==============

This section is a quick reminder of how to record an LTTng kernel
trace. See LTTng's `quick start guide
<http://lttng.org/docs/v2.7/#doc-getting-started>`_ to familiarize
with LTTng.


Automatic
---------

LTTng analyses ships with a handy (installed) script,
``lttng-analyses-record``, which automates
the steps to record a kernel trace with the events required by the
analyses.

To use ``lttng-analyses-record``:

#. Launch the installed script:

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-analyses-record
#. Do whatever it takes for your problem to occur.
#. When you are done recording, press Ctrl+C where the script is
running.


Manual
------

To record an LTTng kernel trace suitable for the LTTng analyses:

#. Create a tracing session:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo lttng create
#. Create a channel with a large sub-buffer size:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo lttng enable-channel --kernel chan --subbuf-size=8M
#. Create event rules to capture the needed events:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan block_bio_backmerge
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan block_bio_remap
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan block_rq_complete
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan block_rq_issue
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan irq_handler_entry
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan irq_handler_exit
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan irq_softirq_entry
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan irq_softirq_exit
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan irq_softirq_raise
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan kmem_mm_page_alloc
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan kmem_mm_page_free
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan lttng_statedump_block_device
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan lttng_statedump_file_descriptor
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan lttng_statedump_process_state
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan mm_page_alloc
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan mm_page_free
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan net_dev_xmit
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan netif_receive_skb
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan sched_pi_setprio
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan sched_process_exec
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan sched_process_fork
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan sched_switch
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan sched_wakeup
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan sched_waking
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan softirq_entry
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan softirq_exit
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan softirq_raise
sudo lttng enable-event --kernel --channel=chan --syscall --all
#. Start recording:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo lttng start
#. Do whatever it takes for your problem to occur.
#. Stop recording and destroy the tracing session to free its
resources:

.. code-block:: bash

sudo lttng stop
sudo lttng destroy


See the `LTTng Documentation <http://lttng.org/docs/>`_ for other
use cases, like sending the trace data over the network instead of
recording trace files on the target's file system.


Run an LTTng analysis
=====================

The **LTTng analyses** are a set of various command-line
analyses. Each analysis accepts the path to a recorded trace
(see `Record a trace`_) as its argument, as well as various command-line
options to control the analysis and its output.

Many command-line options are common to all the analyses, so that you
can filter by timerange, process name, process ID, minimum and maximum
values, and the rest. Also note that the reported timestamps can
optionally be expressed in the GMT time zone.

Each analysis is installed as an executable starting with the
``lttng-`` prefix.

.. list-table:: Available LTTng analyses
:header-rows: 1

* - Command
- Description
* - ``lttng-cputop``
- Per-TID, per-CPU, and total top CPU usage.
* - ``lttng-iolatencyfreq``
- I/O request latency distribution.
* - ``lttng-iolatencystats``
- Partition and system call latency statistics.
* - ``lttng-iolatencytop``
- Top system call latencies.
* - ``lttng-iolog``
- I/O operations log.
* - ``lttng-iousagetop``
- I/O usage top.
* - ``lttng-irqfreq``
- Interrupt handler duration frequency distribution.
* - ``lttng-irqlog``
- Interrupt log.
* - ``lttng-irqstats``
- Hardware and software interrupt statistics.
* - ``lttng-memtop``
- Per-TID top allocated/freed memory.
* - ``lttng-schedfreq``
- Scheduling latency frequency distribution.
* - ``lttng-schedlog``
- Scheduling top.
* - ``lttng-schedstats``
- Scheduling latency stats.
* - ``lttng-schedtop``
- Scheduling top.
* - ``lttng-periodlog``
- Period log.
* - ``lttng-periodstats``
- Period duration stats.
* - ``lttng-periodtop``
- Period duration top.
* - ``lttng-periodfreq``
- Period duration frequency distribution.
* - ``lttng-syscallstats``
- Per-TID and global system call statistics.

Use the ``--help`` option of any command to list the descriptions
of the possible command-line options.

.. NOTE::

You can set the ``LTTNG_ANALYSES_DEBUG`` environment variable to
``1`` when you launch an analysis to enable a debug output. You can
also use the general ``--debug`` option.


Filtering options
-----------------

Depending on the analysis, filter options are available. The complete
list of filter options is:

.. list-table:: Available filtering command-line options
:header-rows: 1

* - Command-line option
- Description
* - ``--begin``
- Trace time at which to begin the analysis.

Format: ``HH:MM:SS[.NNNNNNNNN]``.
* - ``--cpu``
- Comma-delimited list of CPU IDs for which to display the
results.
* - ``--end``
- Trace time at which to end the analysis.

Format: ``HH:MM:SS[.NNNNNNNNN]``.
* - ``--irq``
- List of hardware IRQ numbers for which to display the results.
* - ``--limit``
- Maximum number of output rows per table. This option is useful
for "top" analyses, like ``lttng-cputop``.
* - ``--min``
- Minimum duration (µs) to keep in results.
* - ``--minsize``
- Minimum I/O operation size (B) to keep in results.
* - ``--max``
- Maximum duration (µs) to keep in results.
* - ``--maxsize``
- Maximum I/O operation size (B) to keep in results.
* - ``--procname``
- Comma-delimited list of process names for which to display
the results.
* - ``--softirq``
- List of software IRQ numbers for which to display the results.
* - ``--tid``
- Comma-delimited list of thread IDs for which to display the
results.


Period options
--------------

LTTng analyses feature a powerful "period engine". A *period* is an
interval which begins and ends under specific conditions. When the
analysis results are displayed, they are isolated for the periods
that were opened and closed during the process.

A period can have a parent. If it's the case, then its parent needs
to exist for the period to begin at all. This tree structure of
periods is useful to keep a form of custom user state during the
generic kernel analysis.

.. ATTENTION::

The ``--period`` and ``--period-captures`` options's arguments
include characters that are considered special by most shells,
like ``$``, ``*``, and ``&``.

Make sure to always **single-quote** those arguments when running
the LTTng analyses on the command line.


Period definition
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

You can define one or more periods on the command line, when launching
an analysis, with the ``--period`` option. This option's argument
accepts the following form (content within square brackets is optional)::

[ NAME [ (PARENT) ] ] : BEGINEXPR [ : ENDEXPR ]

``NAME``
Optional name of the period definition. All periods opened from this
definition have this name.

The syntax of this name is the same as a C identifier.

``PARENT``
Optional name of a *previously defined* period which acts as the
parent period definition of this definition.

``NAME`` must be set for ``PARENT`` to be set.

``BEGINEXPR``
Matching expression which a given event must match in order for an
actual period to be instantiated by this definition.

``ENDEXPR``
Matching expression which a given event must match in order for an
instance of this definition to be closed.

If this part is omitted, ``BEGINEXPR`` is used for the ending
expression too.


Matching expression
...................

A matching expression is a C-like logical expression. It supports
nesting expressions with ``(`` and ``)``, as well as the ``&&`` (logical
*AND*), ``||`` (logical *OR*), and ``!`` (logical *NOT*) operators. The
precedence of those operators is the same as in the C language.

The atomic operands in those logical expressions are comparisons. For
the following comparison syntaxes, consider that:

- ``EVT`` indicates an event source. The available event sources are:

``$evt``
Current event.

``$begin.$evt``
In ``BEGINEXPR``: current event (same as ``$evt``).

In ``ENDEXPR``: event which, for this period instance, was matched
when ``BEGINEXPR`` was evaluated.

``$parent.$begin.$evt``
Event which, for the parent period instance of this period instance,
was matched when ``BEGINEXPR`` of the parent was evaluated.
- ``FIELD`` indicates an event field source. The available event field
sources are:

``NAME`` (direct field name)
Automatic scope: try to find the field named ``NAME`` in the dynamic
scopes in this order:

#. Event payload
#. Event context
#. Event header
#. Stream event context
#. Packet context
#. Packet header

``$payload.NAME``
Event payload field named ``NAME``.

``$ctx.NAME``
Event context field named ``NAME``.

``$header.NAME``
Event header field named ``NAME``.

``$stream_ctx.NAME``
Stream event context field named ``NAME``.

``$pkt_ctx.NAME``
Packet context field named ``NAME``.

``$pkt_header.NAME``
Packet header field named ``NAME``.
- ``VALUE`` indicates one of:

- A constant, decimal number. This can be an integer or a real
number, positive or negative, and supports the ``e`` scientific
notation.

Examples: ``23``, ``-18.28``, ``7.2e9``.
- A double-quoted literal string. ``"`` and ``\`` can be escaped
with ``\``.

Examples: ``"hello, world!"``, ``"here's another \"quoted\" string"``.
- An event field, that is, ``EVT.FIELD``, considering the replacements
described above.

- ``NUMVALUE`` indicates one of:

- A constant, decimal number. This can be an integer or a real
number, positive or negative, and supports the ``e`` scientific
notation.

Examples: ``23``, ``-18.28``, ``7.2e9``.
- An event field, that is, ``EVT.FIELD``, considering the replacements
described above.

.. list-table:: Available comparison syntaxes for matching expressions
:header-rows: 1

* - Comparison syntax
- Description
* - #. ``EVT.$name == "NAME"``
#. ``EVT.$name != "NAME"``
#. ``EVT.$name =* "PATTERN"``
- Name matching:

#. Name of event source ``EVT`` is equal to ``NAME``.
#. Name of event source ``EVT`` is not equal to ``NAME``.
#. Name of event source ``EVT`` satisfies the globbing pattern
``PATTERN``
(see `fnmatch <https://docs.python.org/3/library/fnmatch.html>`_).
* - #. ``EVT.FIELD == VALUE``
#. ``EVT.FIELD != VALUE``
#. ``EVT.FIELD < NUMVALUE``
#. ``EVT.FIELD <= NUMVALUE``
#. ``EVT.FIELD > NUMVALUE``
#. ``EVT.FIELD >= NUMVALUE``
#. ``EVT.FIELD =* "PATTERN"``
- Value matching:

#. The value of the field ``EVT.FIELD`` is equal
to the value ``VALUE``.
#. The value of the field ``EVT.FIELD`` is not
equal to the value ``VALUE``.
#. The value of the field ``EVT.FIELD`` is lesser
than the value ``NUMVALUE``.
#. The value of the field ``EVT.FIELD`` is lesser
than or equal to the value ``NUMVALUE``.
#. The value of the field ``EVT.FIELD`` is greater
than the value ``NUMVALUE``.
#. The value of the field ``EVT.FIELD`` is greater
than or equal to the value ``NUMVALUE``.
#. The value of the field ``EVT.FIELD`` satisfies
the globbing pattern ``PATTERN``
(see `fnmatch <https://docs.python.org/3/library/fnmatch.html>`_).

In any case, if ``EVT.FIELD`` does not target an existing field, the
comparison including it fails. Also, string fields cannot be compared to
number values (constant or fields).


Examples
........

- Create a period instance named ``switch`` when:

- The current event name is ``sched_switch``.

End this period instance when:

- The current event name is ``sched_switch``.

Period definition::

switch : $evt.$name == "sched_switch"

- Create a period instance named ``switch`` when:

- The current event name is ``sched_switch`` *AND*
- The current event's ``next_tid`` field is *NOT* equal to 0.

End this period instance when:

- The current event name is ``sched_switch`` *AND*
- The current event's ``prev_tid`` field is equal to
the ``next_tid`` field of the matched event in the begin expression *AND*
- The current event's ``cpu_id`` field is equal to
the ``cpu_id`` field of the matched event in the begin expression.

Period definition::

switch
: $evt.$name == "sched_switch" &&
$evt.next_tid != 0
: $evt.$name == "sched_switch" &&
$evt.prev_tid == $begin.$evt.next_tid &&
$evt.cpu_id == $begin.$evt.cpu_id

- Create a period instance named ``irq`` when:

- A parent period instance named ``switch`` is currently opened.
- The current event name satisfies the ``irq_*_entry`` globbing
pattern *AND*
- The current event's ``cpu_id`` field is equal to the ``cpu_id``
field of the matched event in the begin expression of the parent
period instance.

End this period instance when:

- The current event name is ``irq_handler_exit`` *AND*
- The current event's ``cpu_id`` field is equal to
the ``cpu_id`` field of the matched event in the begin expression.

Period definition::

irq(switch)
: $evt.$name =* "irq_*_entry" &&
$evt.cpu_id == $parent.$begin.$evt.cpu_id
: $evt.$name == "irq_handler_exit" &&
$evt.cpu_id == $begin.$evt.cpu_id

- Create a period instance named ``hello`` when:

- The current event name satisfies the ``hello*`` globbing pattern,
but excludes ``hello world``.

End this period instance when:

- The current event name is the same as the name of the matched event
in the begin expression *AND*
- The current event's ``theid`` header field is lesser than or equal
to 231.

Period definition::

hello
: $evt.$name =* "hello*" &&
$evt.$name != "hello world"
: $evt.$name == $begin.$evt.$name &&
$evt.$header.theid <= 231


Period captures
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

When a period instance begins or ends, the analysis can capture the
current values of specific event fields and display them in its
results.

You can set period captures with the ``--period-captures`` command-line
option. This option's argument accepts the following form
(content within square brackets is optional)::

NAME : BEGINCAPTURES [ : ENDCAPTURES ]

``NAME``
Name of period instances on which to apply those captures.

A ``--period`` option in the same command line must define this name.

``BEGINCAPTURES``
Comma-delimited list of event fields to capture when the beginning
expression of the period definition named ``NAME`` is matched.

``ENDCAPTURES``
Comma-delimited list of event fields to capture when the ending
expression of the period definition named ``NAME`` is matched.

If this part is omitted, there are no end captures.

The format of ``BEGINCAPTURES`` and ``ENDCAPTURES`` is a comma-delimited
list of tokens having this format::

[ CAPTURENAME = ] EVT.FIELD

or::

[ CAPTURENAME = ] EVT.$name

``CAPTURENAME``
Custom name for this capture. The syntax of this name is the same as
a C identifier.

If this part is omitted, the literal expression used for ``EVT.FIELD``
is used.

``EVT`` and ``FIELD``
See `Matching expression`_.


Period select and aggregate parameters
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

With ``lttng-periodlog``, it is possible to see the list of periods in the
context of their parent. By specifying the ``--aggregate-by``, the lines in
the log present on the same line the timerange of the period specified by
the ``--select`` argument at the timerange of the parent period that contains
it. In ``lttng-periodstats`` and ``lttng-periodfreq``, these two flags are
used as filter to limit the output to only the relevant periods. If omitted,
all existing combinations of parent/child statistics and frequency
distributions are output.


Grouping
~~~~~~~~

When fields are captured during the period analyses, it is possible to compute
the statistics and frequency distribution grouped by values of the these
fields, instead of globally for the trace. The format is::

--group-by "PERIODNAME.CAPTURENAME[, PERIODNAME.CAPTURENAME]"

If multiple values are passed, the analysis outputs one list of tables
(statistics and/or frequency distribution) for each unique combination of the
field's values.

For example, if we track the ``open`` system call and we are interested in the
average duration of this call by filename, we only have to capture the filename
field and group the results by ``open.filename``.


Examples
........

Begin captures only::

switch
: $evt.next_tid,
name = $evt.$name,
msg_id = $parent.$begin.$evt.id

Begin and end captures::

hello
: beginning = $evt.$ctx.begin_ts,
$evt.received_bytes
: $evt.send_bytes,
$evt.$name,
begin = $begin.$evt.$ctx.begin_ts
end = $evt.$ctx.end_ts

Top scheduling latency (delay between ``sched_waking(tid=$TID)`` and ``sched_switch(next_tid=$TID)``)
with recording of the procname of the waker (dependant of the ``procname`` context in the trace),
priority and target CPU:

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-periodtop /path/to/trace \
--period 'wake : $evt.$name == "sched_waking" : $evt.$name == "sched_switch" && $evt.next_tid == $begin.$evt.$payload.tid' \
--period-capture 'wake : waker = $evt.procname, prio = $evt.prio : wakee = $evt.next_comm, cpu = $evt.cpu_id'

::

Timerange: [2016-07-21 17:07:47.832234248, 2016-07-21 17:07:48.948152659]
Period top
Begin End Duration (us) Name Begin capture End capture
[17:07:47.835338581, 17:07:47.946834976] 111496.395 wake waker = lttng-consumerd wakee = kworker/0:2
prio = 20 cpu = 0
[17:07:47.850409057, 17:07:47.946829256] 96420.199 wake waker = swapper/2 wakee = migration/0
prio = -100 cpu = 0
[17:07:48.300313282, 17:07:48.300993892] 680.610 wake waker = Xorg wakee = ibus-ui-gtk3
prio = 20 cpu = 3
[17:07:48.300330060, 17:07:48.300920648] 590.588 wake waker = Xorg wakee = ibus-x11
prio = 20 cpu = 3


Log of all the IRQ handled while a user-space process was running, capture the procname of the process interrupted, the name and number of the IRQ:

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-periodlog /path/to/trace \
--period 'switch : $evt.$name == "sched_switch" && $evt.next_tid != 0 : $evt.$name == "sched_switch" && $evt.prev_tid == $begin.$evt.next_tid && $evt.cpu_id == $begin.$evt.cpu_id' \
--period 'irq(switch) : $evt.$name == "irq_handler_entry" && $evt.cpu_id == $parent.$begin.$evt.cpu_id : $evt.$name == "irq_handler_exit" && $evt.cpu_id == $begin.$evt.cpu_id' \
--period-capture 'irq : name = $evt.name, irq = $evt.irq, current = $parent.$begin.$evt.next_comm'

::

Period log
Begin End Duration (us) Name Begin capture End capture
[10:58:26.169238875, 10:58:26.169244920] 6.045 switch
[10:58:26.169598385, 10:58:26.169602967] 4.582 irq name = ahci
irq = 41
current = lttng-consumerd
[10:58:26.169811553, 10:58:26.169816218] 4.665 irq name = ahci
irq = 41
current = lttng-consumerd
[10:58:26.170025600, 10:58:26.170030197] 4.597 irq name = ahci
irq = 41
current = lttng-consumerd
[10:58:26.169236842, 10:58:26.170105711] 868.869 switch


Log of all the ``open`` system call periods aggregated by the ``sched_switch`` in which they occurred:

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-periodlog /path/to/trace \
--period 'switch : $evt.$name == "sched_switch" : $evt.$name == "sched_switch" && $begin.$evt.next_tid == $evt.prev_tid && $begin.$evt.cpu_id == $evt.cpu_id' \
--period 'open(switch) : $evt.$name == "syscall_entry_open" && $parent.$begin.$evt.cpu_id == $evt.cpu_id : $evt.$name == "syscall_exit_open" && $begin.$evt.cpu_id == $evt.cpu_id' \
--period-captures 'switch : comm = $evt.next_comm, cpu = $evt.cpu_id, tid = $evt.next_tid' \
--period-captures 'open : filename = $evt.filename : fd = $evt.ret' \
--select open
--aggregate-by switch

::

Aggregated log
Aggregation of (open) by switch
Parent | | Durations (us) |
Begin End Duration (us) Name | Child name Count | Min Avg Max Stdev Runtime | Parent captures
[10:58:26.222823677, 10:58:26.224039381] 1215.704 switch | switch/open 3 | 7.517 9.548 11.248 1.887 28.644 | switch.comm = bash, switch.cpu = 3, switch.tid = 12420
[10:58:26.856224058, 10:58:26.856589867] 365.809 switch | switch/open 1 | 77.620 77.620 77.620 ? 77.620 | switch.comm = ntpd, switch.cpu = 0, switch.tid = 11132
[10:58:27.000068031, 10:58:27.000954859] 886.828 switch | switch/open 15 | 9.224 16.126 37.190 6.681 241.894 | switch.comm = irqbalance, switch.cpu = 0, switch.tid = 1656
[10:58:27.225474282, 10:58:27.229160014] 3685.732 switch | switch/open 22 | 5.797 6.767 9.308 0.972 148.881 | switch.comm = bash, switch.cpu = 1, switch.tid = 12421


Statistics about the memory allocation performed within an ``open`` system call
within a single ``sched_switch`` (no blocking or preemption):

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-periodstats /path/to/trace \
--period 'switch : $evt.$name == "sched_switch" : $evt.$name == "sched_switch" && $begin.$evt.next_tid == $evt.prev_tid && $begin.$evt.cpu_id == $evt.cpu_id' \
--period 'open(switch) : $evt.$name == "syscall_entry_open" && $parent.$begin.$evt.cpu_id == $evt.cpu_id : $evt.$name == "syscall_exit_open" && $begin.$evt.cpu_id == $evt.cpu_id' \
--period 'alloc(open) : $evt.$name == "kmem_cache_alloc" && $parent.$begin.$evt.cpu_id == $evt.cpu_id : $evt.$name == "kmem_cache_free" && $evt.ptr == $begin.$evt.ptr' \
--period-captures 'switch : comm = $evt.next_comm, cpu = $evt.cpu_id, tid = $evt.next_tid' \
--period-captures 'open : filename = $evt.filename : fd = $evt.ret' \
--period-captures 'alloc : ptr = $evt.ptr'

::

Timerange: [2015-01-06 10:58:26.140545481, 2015-01-06 10:58:27.229358936]
Period tree:
switch
|-- open
|-- alloc

Period statistics (us)
Period Count Min Avg Max Stdev Runtime
switch 831 2.824 5233.363 172056.802 16197.531 4348924.614
switch/open 41 5.797 12.123 77.620 12.076 497.039
switch/open/alloc 44 1.152 10.277 74.476 11.582 452.175

Per-parent period duration statistics (us)
With active children
Period Parent Min Avg Max Stdev
switch/open switch 28.644 124.260 241.894 92.667
switch/open/alloc switch 24.036 113.044 229.713 87.827
switch/open/alloc switch/open 4.550 11.029 74.476 11.768

Per-parent duration ratio (%)
With active children
Period Parent Min Avg Max Stdev
switch/open switch 2 13.723 27 12.421
switch/open/alloc switch 1 12.901 25 12.041
switch/open/alloc switch/open 76 88.146 115 7.529

Per-parent period count statistics
With active children
Period Parent Min Avg Max Stdev
switch/open switch 1 10.250 22 9.979
switch/open/alloc switch 1 11.000 22 10.551
switch/open/alloc switch/open 1 1.073 2 0.264

Per-parent period duration statistics (us)
Globally
Period Parent Min Avg Max Stdev
switch/open switch 0.000 0.598 241.894 10.251
switch/open/alloc switch 0.000 0.544 229.713 9.443
switch/open/alloc switch/open 4.550 11.029 74.476 11.768

Per-parent duration ratio (%)
Globally
Period Parent Min Avg Max Stdev
switch/open switch 0 0.066 27 1.209
switch/open/alloc switch 0 0.062 25 1.150
switch/open/alloc switch/open 76 88.146 115 7.529

Per-parent period count statistics
Globally
Period Parent Min Avg Max Stdev
switch/open switch 0 0.049 22 0.929
switch/open/alloc switch 0 0.053 22 0.991
switch/open/alloc switch/open 1 1.073 2 0.264


These statistics can also be scoped by value of the FD returned by the ``open``
system, by appending ``--group-by "open.fd"`` to the previous command line.
That way previous tables will be output for each value of FD returned, so it
is possible to observe the behaviour based on the parameters of a system call.

Using the ``lttng-periodfreq`` or the ``--freq`` parameter, these tables can
also be presented as frequency distributions.


Progress options
----------------

If the `progressbar <https://pypi.python.org/pypi/progressbar/>`_
optional dependency is installed, a progress bar is available to
indicate the progress of the analysis.

By default, the progress bar is based on the current event's timestamp.

Progress options are:

.. list-table:: Available progress command-line options
:header-rows: 1

* - Command-line option
- Description
* - ``--no-progress``
- Disable the progress bar.
* - ``--progress-use-size``
- Use the approximate event size instead of the current event's
timestamp to estimate the progress value.


Machine interface
-----------------

If you want to display LTTng analyses results in a custom viewer,
you can use the JSON-based LTTng analyses machine interface (LAMI).
Each command in the previous table has its corresponding LAMI version
with the ``-mi`` suffix. For example, the LAMI version of
``lttng-cputop`` is ``lttng-cputop-mi``.

This version of LTTng analyses conforms to
`LAMI 1.0 <http://lttng.org/files/lami/lami-1.0.1.html>`_.





Examples
========

This section shows a few examples of using some LTTng analyses.

I/O
---

Partition and system call latency statistics
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-iolatencystats /path/to/trace

::

Timerange: [2015-01-06 10:58:26.140545481, 2015-01-06 10:58:27.229358936]
Syscalls latency statistics (usec):
Type Count Min Average Max Stdev
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Open 45 5.562 13.835 77.683 15.263
Read 109 0.316 5.774 62.569 9.277
Write 101 0.256 7.060 48.531 8.555
Sync 207 19.384 40.664 160.188 21.201

Disk latency statistics (usec):
Name Count Min Average Max Stdev
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
dm-0 108 0.001 0.004 0.007 1.306


I/O request latency distribution
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-iolatencyfreq /path/to/trace

::

Timerange: [2015-01-06 10:58:26.140545481, 2015-01-06 10:58:27.229358936]
Open latency distribution (usec)
###############################################################################
5.562 ███████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 25
9.168 ██████████ 4
12.774 █████████████████████ 8
16.380 ████████ 3
19.986 █████ 2
23.592 0
27.198 0
30.804 0
34.410 ██ 1
38.016 0
41.623 0
45.229 0
48.835 0
52.441 0
56.047 0
59.653 0
63.259 0
66.865 0
70.471 0
74.077 █████ 2


Top system call latencies
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-iolatencytop /path/to/trace --limit=3 --minsize=2

::

Checking the trace for lost events...
Timerange: [2015-01-15 12:18:37.216484041, 2015-01-15 12:18:53.821580313]
Top open syscall latencies (usec)
Begin End Name Duration (usec) Size Proc PID Filename
[12:18:50.432950815,12:18:50.870648568] open 437697.753 N/A apache2 31517 /var/lib/php5/sess_0ifir2hangm8ggaljdphl9o5b5 (fd=13)
[12:18:52.946080165,12:18:52.946132278] open 52.113 N/A apache2 31588 /var/lib/php5/sess_mr9045p1k55vin1h0vg7rhgd63 (fd=13)
[12:18:46.800846035,12:18:46.800874916] open 28.881 N/A apache2 31591 /var/lib/php5/sess_r7c12pccfvjtas15g3j69u14h0 (fd=13)
[12:18:51.389797604,12:18:51.389824426] open 26.822 N/A apache2 31520 /var/lib/php5/sess_4sdb1rtjkhb78sabnoj8gpbl00 (fd=13)

Top read syscall latencies (usec)
Begin End Name Duration (usec) Size Proc PID Filename
[12:18:37.256073107,12:18:37.256555967] read 482.860 7.00 B bash 10237 unknown (origin not found) (fd=3)
[12:18:52.000209798,12:18:52.000252304] read 42.506 1.00 KB irqbalance 1337 /proc/interrupts (fd=3)
[12:18:37.256559439,12:18:37.256601615] read 42.176 5.00 B bash 10237 unknown (origin not found) (fd=3)
[12:18:42.000281918,12:18:42.000320016] read 38.098 1.00 KB irqbalance 1337 /proc/interrupts (fd=3)

Top write syscall latencies (usec)
Begin End Name Duration (usec) Size Proc PID Filename
[12:18:49.913241516,12:18:49.915908862] write 2667.346 95.00 B apache2 31584 /var/log/apache2/access.log (fd=8)
[12:18:37.472823631,12:18:37.472859836] writev 36.205 21.97 KB apache2 31544 unknown (origin not found) (fd=12)
[12:18:37.991578372,12:18:37.991612724] writev 34.352 21.97 KB apache2 31589 unknown (origin not found) (fd=12)
[12:18:39.547778549,12:18:39.547812515] writev 33.966 21.97 KB apache2 31584 unknown (origin not found) (fd=12)

Top sync syscall latencies (usec)
Begin End Name Duration (usec) Size Proc PID Filename
[12:18:50.162776739,12:18:51.157522361] sync 994745.622 N/A sync 22791 None (fd=None)
[12:18:37.227867532,12:18:37.232289687] sync_file_range 4422.155 N/A lttng-consumerd 19964 /home/julien/lttng-traces/analysis-20150115-120942/kernel/metadata (fd=32)
[12:18:37.238076585,12:18:37.239012027] sync_file_range 935.442 N/A lttng-consumerd 19964 /home/julien/lttng-traces/analysis-20150115-120942/kernel/metadata (fd=32)
[12:18:37.220974711,12:18:37.221647124] sync_file_range 672.413 N/A lttng-consumerd 19964 /home/julien/lttng-traces/analysis-20150115-120942/kernel/metadata (fd=32)


I/O operations log
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-iolog /path/to/trace

::

[10:58:26.221618530,10:58:26.221620659] write 2.129 8.00 B /usr/bin/x-term 11793 anon_inode:[eventfd] (fd=5)
[10:58:26.221623609,10:58:26.221628055] read 4.446 50.00 B /usr/bin/x-term 11793 /dev/ptmx (fd=24)
[10:58:26.221638929,10:58:26.221640008] write 1.079 8.00 B /usr/bin/x-term 11793 anon_inode:[eventfd] (fd=5)
[10:58:26.221676232,10:58:26.221677385] read 1.153 8.00 B /usr/bin/x-term 11793 anon_inode:[eventfd] (fd=5)
[10:58:26.223401804,10:58:26.223411683] open 9.879 N/A sleep 12420 /etc/ld.so.cache (fd=3)
[10:58:26.223448060,10:58:26.223455577] open 7.517 N/A sleep 12420 /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6 (fd=3)
[10:58:26.223456522,10:58:26.223458898] read 2.376 832.00 B sleep 12420 /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6 (fd=3)
[10:58:26.223918068,10:58:26.223929316] open 11.248 N/A sleep 12420 (fd=3)
[10:58:26.231881565,10:58:26.231895970] writev 14.405 16.00 B /usr/bin/x-term 11793 socket:[45650] (fd=4)
[10:58:26.231979636,10:58:26.231988446] recvmsg 8.810 16.00 B Xorg 1827 socket:[47480] (fd=38)


I/O usage top
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-iousagetop /path/to/trace

::

Timerange: [2014-10-07 16:36:00.733214969, 2014-10-07 16:36:18.804584183]
Per-process I/O Read
###############################################################################
██████████████████████████████████████████████████ 16.00 MB lttng-consumerd (2619) 0 B file 4.00 B net 16.00 MB unknown
█████ 1.72 MB lttng-consumerd (2619) 0 B file 0 B net 1.72 MB unknown
█ 398.13 KB postgres (4219) 121.05 KB file 277.07 KB net 8.00 B unknown
256.09 KB postgres (1348) 0 B file 255.97 KB net 117.00 B unknown
204.81 KB postgres (4218) 204.81 KB file 0 B net 0 B unknown
123.77 KB postgres (4220) 117.50 KB file 6.26 KB net 8.00 B unknown
Per-process I/O Write
###############################################################################
██████████████████████████████████████████████████ 16.00 MB lttng-consumerd (2619) 0 B file 8.00 MB net 8.00 MB unknown
██████ 2.20 MB postgres (4219) 2.00 MB file 202.23 KB net 0 B unknown
█████ 1.73 MB lttng-consumerd (2619) 0 B file 887.73 KB net 882.58 KB unknown
██ 726.33 KB postgres (1165) 8.00 KB file 6.33 KB net 712.00 KB unknown
158.69 KB postgres (1168) 158.69 KB file 0 B net 0 B unknown
80.66 KB postgres (1348) 0 B file 80.66 KB net 0 B unknown
Files Read
###############################################################################
██████████████████████████████████████████████████ 8.00 MB anon_inode:[lttng_stream] (lttng-consumerd) 'fd 32 in lttng-consumerd (2619)'
█████ 834.41 KB base/16384/pg_internal.init 'fd 7 in postgres (4219)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4220)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4221)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4222)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4223)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4224)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4225)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4226)'
█ 256.09 KB socket:[8893] (postgres) 'fd 9 in postgres (1348)'
█ 174.69 KB pg_stat_tmp/pgstat.stat 'fd 9 in postgres (4218)', 'fd 9 in postgres (1167)'
109.48 KB global/pg_internal.init 'fd 7 in postgres (4218)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4219)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4220)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4221)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4222)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4223)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4224)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4225)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4226)'
104.30 KB base/11951/pg_internal.init 'fd 7 in postgres (4218)'
12.85 KB socket (lttng-sessiond) 'fd 30 in lttng-sessiond (384)'
4.50 KB global/pg_filenode.map 'fd 7 in postgres (4218)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4219)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4220)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4221)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4222)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4223)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4224)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4225)', 'fd 7 in postgres (4226)'
4.16 KB socket (postgres) 'fd 9 in postgres (4226)'
4.00 KB /proc/interrupts 'fd 3 in irqbalance (1104)'
Files Write
###############################################################################
██████████████████████████████████████████████████ 8.00 MB socket:[56371] (lttng-consumerd) 'fd 30 in lttng-consumerd (2619)'
█████████████████████████████████████████████████ 8.00 MB pipe:[53306] (lttng-consumerd) 'fd 12 in lttng-consumerd (2619)'
██████████ 1.76 MB pg_xlog/00000001000000000000000B 'fd 31 in postgres (4219)'
█████ 887.82 KB socket:[56369] (lttng-consumerd) 'fd 26 in lttng-consumerd (2619)'
█████ 882.58 KB pipe:[53309] (lttng-consumerd) 'fd 18 in lttng-consumerd (2619)'
160.00 KB /var/lib/postgresql/9.1/main/base/16384/16602 'fd 14 in postgres (1165)'
158.69 KB pg_stat_tmp/pgstat.tmp 'fd 3 in postgres (1168)'
144.00 KB /var/lib/postgresql/9.1/main/base/16384/16613 'fd 12 in postgres (1165)'
88.00 KB /var/lib/postgresql/9.1/main/base/16384/16609 'fd 11 in postgres (1165)'
78.28 KB socket:[8893] (postgres) 'fd 9 in postgres (1348)'
Block I/O Read
###############################################################################
Block I/O Write
###############################################################################
██████████████████████████████████████████████████ 1.76 MB postgres (pid=4219)
████ 160.00 KB postgres (pid=1168)
██ 100.00 KB kworker/u8:0 (pid=1540)
██ 96.00 KB jbd2/vda1-8 (pid=257)
█ 40.00 KB postgres (pid=1166)
8.00 KB kworker/u9:0 (pid=4197)
4.00 KB kworker/u9:2 (pid=1381)
Disk nr_sector
###############################################################################
███████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 4416.00 sectors vda1
Disk nr_requests
###############################################################################
████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 177.00 requests vda1
Disk request time/sector
###############################################################################
██████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 0.01 ms vda1
Network recv_bytes
###############################################################################
███████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 739.50 KB eth0
█████ 80.27 KB lo
Network sent_bytes
###############################################################################
████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 9.36 MB eth0


System calls
--------

Per-TID and global system call statistics
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-syscallstats /path/to/trace

::

Timerange: [2015-01-15 12:18:37.216484041, 2015-01-15 12:18:53.821580313]
Per-TID syscalls statistics (usec)
find (22785) Count Min Average Max Stdev Return values
- getdents 14240 0.380 364.301 43372.450 1629.390 {'success': 14240}
- close 14236 0.233 0.506 4.932 0.217 {'success': 14236}
- fchdir 14231 0.252 0.407 5.769 0.117 {'success': 14231}
- open 7123 0.779 2.321 12.697 0.936 {'success': 7119, 'ENOENT': 4}
- newfstatat 7118 1.457 143.562 28103.532 1410.281 {'success': 7118}
- openat 7118 1.525 2.411 9.107 0.771 {'success': 7118}
- newfstat 7117 0.272 0.654 8.707 0.248 {'success': 7117}
- write 573 0.298 0.715 8.584 0.391 {'success': 573}
- brk 27 0.615 5.768 30.792 7.830 {'success': 27}
- rt_sigaction 22 0.227 0.283 0.589 0.098 {'success': 22}
- mmap 12 1.116 2.116 3.597 0.762 {'success': 12}
- mprotect 6 1.185 2.235 3.923 1.148 {'success': 6}
- read 5 0.925 2.101 6.300 2.351 {'success': 5}
- ioctl 4 0.342 1.151 2.280 0.873 {'success': 2, 'ENOTTY': 2}
- access 4 1.166 2.530 4.202 1.527 {'ENOENT': 4}
- rt_sigprocmask 3 0.325 0.570 0.979 0.357 {'success': 3}
- dup2 2 0.250 0.562 0.874 ? {'success': 2}
- munmap 2 3.006 5.399 7.792 ? {'success': 2}
- execve 1 7277.974 7277.974 7277.974 ? {'success': 1}
- setpgid 1 0.945 0.945 0.945 ? {'success': 1}
- fcntl 1 ? 0.000 0.000 ? {}
- newuname 1 1.240 1.240 1.240 ? {'success': 1}
Total: 71847
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
apache2 (31517) Count Min Average Max Stdev Return values
- fcntl 192 ? 0.000 0.000 ? {}
- newfstat 156 0.237 0.484 1.102 0.222 {'success': 156}
- read 144 0.307 1.602 16.307 1.698 {'success': 117, 'EAGAIN': 27}
- access 96 0.705 1.580 3.364 0.670 {'success': 12, 'ENOENT': 84}
- newlstat 84 0.459 0.738 1.456 0.186 {'success': 63, 'ENOENT': 21}
- newstat 74 0.735 2.266 11.212 1.772 {'success': 50, 'ENOENT': 24}
- lseek 72 0.317 0.522 0.915 0.112 {'success': 72}
- close 39 0.471 0.615 0.867 0.069 {'success': 39}
- open 36 2.219 12162.689 437697.753 72948.868 {'success': 36}
- getcwd 28 0.287 0.701 1.331 0.277 {'success': 28}
- poll 27 1.080 1139.669 2851.163 856.723 {'success': 27}
- times 24 0.765 0.956 1.327 0.107 {'success': 24}
- setitimer 24 0.499 5.848 16.668 4.041 {'success': 24}
- write 24 5.467 6.784 16.827 2.459 {'success': 24}
- writev 24 10.241 17.645 29.817 5.116 {'success': 24}
- mmap 15 3.060 3.482 4.406 0.317 {'success': 15}
- munmap 15 2.944 3.502 4.154 0.427 {'success': 15}
- brk 12 0.738 4.579 13.795 4.437 {'success': 12}
- chdir 12 0.989 1.600 2.353 0.385 {'success': 12}
- flock 6 0.906 1.282 2.043 0.423 {'success': 6}
- rt_sigaction 6 0.530 0.725 1.123 0.217 {'success': 6}
- pwrite64 6 1.262 1.430 1.692 0.143 {'success': 6}
- rt_sigprocmask 6 0.539 0.650 0.976 0.162 {'success': 6}
- shutdown 3 7.323 8.487 10.281 1.576 {'success': 3}
- getsockname 3 1.015 1.228 1.585 0.311 {'success': 3}
- accept4 3 5174453.611 3450157.282 5176018.235 ? {'success': 2}
Total: 1131


Interrupts
----------

Hardware and software interrupt statistics
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-irqstats /path/to/trace

::

Timerange: [2014-03-11 16:05:41.314824752, 2014-03-11 16:05:45.041994298]
Hard IRQ Duration (us)
count min avg max stdev
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
1: <i8042> 30 10.901 45.500 64.510 18.447 |
42: <ahci> 259 3.203 7.863 21.426 3.183 |
43: <eth0> 2 3.859 3.976 4.093 0.165 |
44: <iwlwifi> 92 0.300 3.995 6.542 2.181 |

Soft IRQ Duration (us) Raise latency (us)
count min avg max stdev | count min avg max stdev
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------|------------------------------------------------------------
1: <TIMER_SOFTIRQ> 495 0.202 21.058 51.060 11.047 | 53 2.141 11.217 20.005 7.233
3: <NET_RX_SOFTIRQ> 14 0.133 9.177 32.774 10.483 | 14 0.763 3.703 10.902 3.448
4: <BLOCK_SOFTIRQ> 257 5.981 29.064 125.862 15.891 | 257 0.891 3.104 15.054 2.046
6: <TASKLET_SOFTIRQ> 26 0.309 1.198 1.748 0.329 | 26 9.636 39.222 51.430 11.246
7: <SCHED_SOFTIRQ> 299 1.185 14.768 90.465 15.992 | 298 1.286 31.387 61.700 11.866
9: <RCU_SOFTIRQ> 338 0.592 3.387 13.745 1.356 | 147 2.480 29.299 64.453 14.286


Interrupt handler duration frequency distribution
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.. code-block:: bash

lttng-irqfreq --timerange=[16:05:42,16:05:45] --irq=44 --stats /path/to/trace

::

Timerange: [2014-03-11 16:05:42.042034570, 2014-03-11 16:05:44.998914297]
Hard IRQ Duration (us)
count min avg max stdev
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
44: <iwlwifi> 72 0.300 4.018 6.542 2.164 |
Frequency distribution iwlwifi (44)
###############################################################################
0.300 █████ 1.00
0.612 ██████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 12.00
0.924 ████████████████████ 4.00
1.236 ██████████ 2.00
1.548 0.00
1.861 █████ 1.00
2.173 0.00
2.485 █████ 1.00
2.797 ██████████████████████████ 5.00
3.109 █████ 1.00
3.421 ███████████████ 3.00
3.733 0.00
4.045 █████ 1.00
4.357 █████ 1.00
4.669 ██████████ 2.00
4.981 ██████████ 2.00
5.294 █████████████████████████████████████████ 8.00
5.606 ████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 13.00
5.918 ██████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████ 12.00
6.230 ███████████████ 3.00


Community
=========

LTTng analyses is part of the `LTTng <http://lttng.org/>`_ project
and shares its community.

We hope you have fun trying this project and please remember it is a
work in progress; feedback, bug reports and improvement ideas are always
welcome!

.. list-table:: LTTng analyses project's communication channels
:header-rows: 1

* - Item
- Location
- Notes
* - Mailing list
- `lttng-dev <https://lists.lttng.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/lttng-dev>`_
(``lttng-dev@lists.lttng.org``)
- Preferably, use the ``[lttng-analyses]`` subject prefix
* - IRC
- ``#lttng`` on the OFTC network
-
* - Code contribution
- Create a new GitHub
`pull request <https://github.com/lttng/lttng-analyses/pulls>`_
-
* - Bug reporting
- Create a new GitHub
`issue <https://github.com/lttng/lttng-analyses/issues/new>`_
-
* - Continuous integration
- `lttng-analyses_master_build item
<https://ci.lttng.org/job/lttng-analyses_master_build/>`_ on
LTTng's CI and `lttng/lttng-analyses project
<https://travis-ci.org/lttng/lttng-analyses>`_
on Travis CI
-
* - Blog
- The `LTTng blog <http://lttng.org/blog/>`_ contains some posts
about LTTng analyses
-
Release History

Release History

This version
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0.6.1

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0.6.0

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0.5.4

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0.5.3

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0.5.2

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0.5.1

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0.5.0

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0.4.3

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0.4.2

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0.4.1

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0.4.0

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0.3.0

History Node

0.2.0

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