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Project Description

iCal is a relatively compact albeit unintuitive and inconvenient text format for calendaring and scheduling information. Recurring events can be defined through a large set of rules, which makes the format compact but inconvenient for automatic processing. The intention of this package is to provide functions to ease the automatic processing of iCalendar files by converting the iCalendar information into a timetable.

Installation

Timetable requires Python 2 or 3. You can install Timetable easily via pip:

$ pip install timetable

Documentation & Code

You can find a short guide, some examples, and the API reference in the online documentation. The source code is available on Bitbucket.

If you find any bugs, please post them in the issue tracker.

Getting started

A timetable is a sorted sequence of tuples containing start and end datetime of an entry, for example (start, end, entry). start and end are datetime offset-naive objects (e.g. containing no timezone information) in UTC time. The entry is a dictionary, containing arbitrary values.

The following example is a valid timetable list:

[
    (datetime(2015, 1, 1, 12), datetime(2015, 1, 1, 13), {}),
    (datetime(2015, 1, 2, 12), datetime(2015, 1, 2, 13), {}),
    (datetime(2015, 1, 3, 12), datetime(2015, 1, 3, 13), {}),
]

Timetables can be generated from iCal files. The following example shows how a timetable is generated from all VEVENT entries in a iCal calendar. The example prints the start datetime of each entry as well as the calendar events summary:

>>> from timetable import parse_ical, generate_timetable
>>>
>>> icaldata = b"""
... BEGIN:VCALENDAR
... BEGIN:VEVENT
... UID:0
... DTSTART:20150101T120000Z
... DTEND:20150101T130000Z
... RRULE:FREQ=DAILY;COUNT=3;BYDAY=TH,FR
... SUMMARY:event a
... END:VEVENT
... BEGIN:VEVENT
... UID:1
... DTSTART:20150101T123000Z
... DTEND:20150101T133000Z
... RRULE:FREQ=DAILY;COUNT=3
... SUMMARY:event b
... END:VEVENT
... END:VCALENDAR
... """
>>> calendar = parse_ical(icaldata)[0]
>>> for start, end, entry in generate_timetable(calendar, b'vevent'):
...     summary = str(entry['item'][b'summary'][0].value.decode('utf-8'))
...     print('%s %s' % (start.isoformat(), summary))
2015-01-01T12:00:00 event a
2015-01-01T12:30:00 event b
2015-01-02T12:00:00 event a
2015-01-02T12:30:00 event b
2015-01-03T12:30:00 event b
2015-01-08T12:00:00 event a

spam or eggs?

Timetable data can be used to calculate metrics for time management, like for example, compute the time spent in meetings or working on projects.

However, of more pressing concern is the question if you spent more time eating eggs or spam for lunch in two months, assuming you eat spam for 45 minutes but only every other week on monday and tuesday whereas you eat eggs for 15 minutes every week but only from wednesday to friday:

>>> from datetime import datetime, timedelta
>>> from timetable import parse_ical, generate_timetable, clip_timetable
>>>
>>> icaldata = b"""
... BEGIN:VCALENDAR
... BEGIN:VEVENT
... UID:0
... DTSTART:20150101T120000Z
... DTEND:20150101T124500Z
... RRULE:FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=MO,TU;INTERVAL=2
... SUMMARY:spam
... END:VEVENT
... BEGIN:VEVENT
... UID:1
... DTSTART:20150101T120000Z
... DTEND:20150101T121500Z
... RRULE:FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=WE,TH,FR
... SUMMARY:eggs
... END:VEVENT
... END:VCALENDAR
... """
>>> calendar = parse_ical(icaldata)[0]
>>>
>>> start = datetime(2015, 1, 1)
>>> end = datetime(2015, 3, 1)
>>> timetable = clip_timetable(generate_timetable(calendar), start, end)
>>>
>>> time = {b'spam': 0, b'eggs': 0}
>>> for start, end, entry in timetable:
...     food_name = entry['item'][b'summary'][0].value
...     time[food_name] += (end - start).total_seconds() / 3600
>>>
>>> print('spam: %.2f, eggs: %.2f' % (time[b'spam'], time[b'eggs']))
spam: 6.75, eggs: 6.50

It looks like spam.

Release History

Release History

0.2

This version

History Node

TODO: Figure out how to actually get changelog content.

Changelog content for this version goes here.

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Download Files

Download Files

TODO: Brief introduction on what you do with files - including link to relevant help section.

File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
timetable-0.2.tar.gz (12.2 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Feb 20, 2016

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