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Project Description

About

voicecoding is a program that will allow people to code in Python using their voice. Using different voice commands that can be found in the documentation, users can perform simple tasks in Python in an environment similar to the Python command-line interpreter. voicecoding is currently only a command-line application, but the plan is for it to eventually become a full Python IDE controlled completely by voice, while still staying open source and free. You can check this project out on PyPi or fork it on Github.

After you’ve installed the program, you can run it by typing

python -m voicecoding

in your command prompt or terminal.

Installation

On all operating systems, you first need to install the program itself using pip:

pip install voicecoding

That will also install SpeechRecognition which voicecoding depends on. You will have to manually install PyAudio, the other library that voicecoding depends on. The method of installation varies by operating system.

Microsoft Windows

You can simply just use pip:

pip install pyaudio

Mac OS X

First, you must install the PortAudio library with brew and then use pip to install PyAudio:

brew install portaudio

pip install pyaudio

Ubuntu/Debian

Run:

sudo apt-get install python-pyaudio python3-pyaudio

If that does not work, you should just try installing with pip:

pip install pyaudio

Documentation

Commands

Assign

  • structure: “assign” {say a data type and a value} “to variable” {say a name for the variable}
  • assigns a value to a variable
  • example inputs: “assign 10 to variable x”, “assign list hello cut world to variable y”
  • example outputs: x = 10, y = ["hello", "world"]

Print

  • structure: “print” {say a data type and a value}
  • prints out a value
  • example inputs: “print 10”, “print hello comma world exclamation point”
  • example outputs: print(10), print("hello, world!")

Call

  • structure: “call” {say a function or method expression}
  • calls any function or method that may modify another piece of data
  • example inputs: “call variable x method append parameters 1”, “call variable x method pop”
  • example outputs: x.append(1), x.pop()

Import

  • structure: “import” {say any module name}
  • imports a module to allow its method to be used
  • example inputs: “import math”, “import web browser”
  • example outputs: import math, import webbrowser

If/Elif/Else

  • structure: “if comparison”(comparison is optional) {say a comparison} “elif comparison”(comparison is optional) {say a comparison} “else” “end” - unindents or ends entire statements
  • control flow statement based on logic; after saying one of the above commands, you can use others command inside of it
  • example inputs: “if comparison variable x equals variable y”, “elif variable x is greater than variable y”, “else”
  • example outputs: if x == y:, elif x > y:, else:

For

  • structure: “for” {variable name} “in” {say an iterable data type and a value} “end” - unindents or ends entire statement
  • control flow statement that iterates over a data type; after using the command, you can use other commands inside of it
  • example inputs: “for i in list one cut two cut three”, “for i in function range params one hundred”
  • example outputs: for i in [1, 2, 3]:, for i in range(100)

While

  • structure: “while comparison”(comparison is optional) {say a comparison} “end” - unindents or ends entire statement
  • control flow statement that will continue while a condition is true; after using this command, you can use other commands inside of it
  • example inputs: “while comparison i is less than one hundred”, “while true”
  • example outputs: while i < 100:, while True:

Define

  • structure: “define function”(function is optional) {say a name for the function} “parameters variable”(variable is optional) {say a name for the parameter} “cut” …
  • used to allow users to define their own functions; after using this command, you can use other commands inside of it
  • example inputs: “define function fibonacci parameters variable number”, “define factorial params number”
  • example outputs: def fibonacci(number):, def factorial(number):

Return

  • structure: “return” {say a data type and a value}
  • returns data from a function; can only be used in functions
  • example inputs: “return variable x”, “return false”
  • example outputs: return x, return False

Data Types

Integer*

  • any whole number
  • structure: “integer”(optional) {say any whole number}
  • example inputs: “integer one”, “twelve”, “one hundred forty two”
  • example outputs: 1,12, 142

String*

  • any piece of text; is iterable
  • structure: “string”(optional) {say anything}
  • example inputs: “string hello comma world exclamation point”, “space”, “if you’re reading this it’s too late”
  • example outputs: "hello, world!", " ", "if you're reading this it's too late"

Float*

  • a decimal number
  • structure: “float”(optional) {say any decimal}
  • example inputs: “float one point two”, “three point one four one five nine”
  • example outputs: 1.2, 3.14159

Boolean*

  • stores data as true or false
  • structure: “boolean”(optional) {either “true” or “false”}
  • example inputs: “boolean true”, “false”
  • example outputs: True, False

Variable**

  • stores data types
  • structure: “variable”(sometimes optional) {any name}
  • example inputs: “variable x”, “variable hello world”, “i”
  • example outputs: x, hello_world, i

Module**

  • allows you to use functions and methods from different Python files (note: always used with a method)
  • stucture: “module method” {method name}
  • example inputs: “module math method factorial parameters ten”, “module web browser method open params URL”
  • example outputs: math.factorial(10), webbrowser.open(url)

Equation

  • for math and simple string concatenation
  • structure: “equation” {say a data type and a value} {say an equation operator {say a data type and a value} …
  • example inputs: “equation one plus five”, “equation 12 times 4 plus 3”, “equation 6 mod 5”
  • example outputs: 1 + 5, 12 * 4  + 3, 6 % 5

Comparison

  • for comparing different Python objects
  • structure: “comparison” {say a data type and a value} {say a comparison operator} {say a data type and a value} …
  • example inputs: “comparison variable x is True”, “comparison ten is greater than twenty five”, “comparison five is less than seven and ten is greater than nine”
  • example outputs: x is True, 10 > 25, 5 < 7 and 10 > 9

List

  • ordered group of different Python objects; is iterable
  • structure: “list” {say a data type} {say a value} “cut” {say a data type and a value} …
  • example inputs: “list”, “list one cut two cut three”, “list hello cut one point five”
  • example outputs: [], [1, 2, 3], ["hello", 1.5]

Tuple

  • immutable sequence of Python objects
  • structure: “tuple” {say a data type} {say a value} “cut” {say a data type and a value} …
  • example inputs: “tuple”, “tuple one cut two cut three”, “tuple hello”
  • example outputs: (), (1, 2, 3), ("hello",)

Set

  • group of unordered, unique Python objects
  • structure: “set” {say a data type and a value} “cut” {say a data type} {say a value} …
  • example inputs: “set”, “set one cut one cut three”, “set hello cut one point five”
  • example outputs: set(), {1, 3}, {"hello", 1.5}

Function

  • blocks of code that can perform action on parameters; when naming a builtin function, you can say what a shorthand name actually means; ie: “integer” -> int(), “length” -> len(), “has attribute” -> hasattr()
  • structure: “function” {say a function name} “parameters” {say a data type and a value} cut …
  • example inputs: “function list parameters hello”, “function int params string ten”
  • example outputs: list("hello"), int("10")

*Doesn’t have be said when using this data type in a command; ie: you can just say “one” instead of “integer one” to get the result of 1.

**”Variable” doesn’t have to be said if the variable has been defined, is being used as a parameter in a function or method, or is the variable in a for loop. “Module” doesn’t have to be said if the module is already imported.

Other Things

Methods

  • blocks of code that are called on class instances to perform actions
  • structure: {say a data type and a value} “method” {say a method name} “parameters” {say a data type and a value} cut …
  • example inputs: “variable x method append parameters one”, “space method join params function list params hello”
  • example outputs: x.append(1), " ".join(list("hello"))

Keywords

Equation Operators

  • for use in equations
  • + - “plus”
  • - - “minus”
  • * - “times”, “multiplied by”
  • / - “divided by”
  • ** - “to the power of”
  • % - “mod”, “modulus”

Comparison Operators

  • for use in comparison expressions
  • == - “equals”, “is equal to”
  • != - “does not equal”, “is not equal to”
  • > - “is greater than”
  • < - “is less than”
  • >= - “is greater than or equal to”
  • <= - “is less than or equal to”
  • Key words
  • and
  • or
  • is
  • not
  • in

Shorthand words

  • “params” can be used in place of “parameters”
Release History

Release History

2.1.2

This version

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2.0.1

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1.1.0

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1.0.0

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File Name & Checksum SHA256 Checksum Help Version File Type Upload Date
voicecoding-2.1.2.tar.gz (22.2 kB) Copy SHA256 Checksum SHA256 Source Mar 4, 2016

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